How To Give A Cat A Shot

Giving Injections to Cats

A number of medical disorders can be managed with the administration of medications that are only accessible in injectable form. Two of these requirements are as follows:

  • The management of diabetesmellitus requires daily insulin injections
  • The management of some allergies requires frequent injections of allergenic extracts
  • And the management of certain autoimmune diseases.

The majority of cat owners are willing and capable of administering these treatments at their residence. If you opt to provide this therapy to your cat, your veterinarian will go through the precise administration strategy with you and make sure that you are comfortable with it before you begin. The following information may be useful to you in making your decision.

Will the injection hurt my cat?

The majority of cat owners are willing and able to provide these drugs at their residence. Upon deciding to provide this therapy to your cat, your veterinarian will go through the precise administration strategy with you and make sure that you are comfortable with it before you proceed. Here are some suggestions to help you make a choice:

What happens if my cat moves when I give the injection?

In many circumstances, cat owners are willing and able to give these treatments in the comfort of their own homes. If you opt to provide this therapy to your cat, your veterinarian will go through the precise administration strategy with you to ensure that you are comfortable with it. The following information may be useful in making your selection.

Is there any danger if she doesn’t keep still?

The majority of owners are anxious that they will break the needle while it is still in the skin, however this is exceedingly unlikely to happen in most cases. It is possible that the needle will bend, but when dealing with a wiggly creature, it is far more probable that the injection will end up outside the pet than than within it. For further instructions, contact your veterinarian if you are unclear if your pet received the complete dose of the injection. It is generally recommended that if you are unclear of how much you injected, you do not administer any more unless instructed to do so by your veterinarian.

Can you explain the exact technique of giving an injection?

A common anxiety among pet owners is that they will accidentally break the needle while it is in the skin. However, this is exceedingly uncommon to happen. It is possible that the needle will bend, but when dealing with a wiggly creature, it is far more probable that the injection will end up outside the pet than than within it. For further instructions, contact your veterinarian if you are unclear that your pet received the complete dosage of the injection. Generally speaking, if you are unclear of how much you injected, do not administer any more unless instructed to do so by your veterinarian or healthcare professional.

  • Begin by squeezing some loose skin around the back of your cat’s neck between your thumb and forefinger
  • This will help to loosen the skin. Maintain tight control of the syringe in your dominant hand in whatever manner seems most comfortable. Avoid putting your hand or finger over the syringe’s plunger in case your cat suddenly shifts and pushes your hand, resulting in the contents of the syringe being wasted or mistakenly injected
  • Using a thirty- to forty-five-degree angle, insert the needle quickly into the fold of skin with the needle tilted downwards. Most syringes are tiny enough that the plunger can be depressed with the palm of the same hand after the needle has been inserted beneath the skin
  • However, some syringes are too small for this. Administer the contents of the syringe as rapidly as possible and then remove the needle. Gently massage the affected area.

It will be easier to complete the treatment if you have someone to assist you. Most pet owners, however, discover that with a little experience, they have no trouble delivering regular shots to their cat without the aid of another person.

How should I dispose of the needles and syringes?

It will be easier to complete the treatment if you have someone to help you out. Fortunately, with a little experience, the majority of pet owners discover that they have no difficulty delivering regular shots to their cats on their own.

How to Give a Cat an Injection

Documentation Download Documentation Download Documentation Anyone who has brought their cat to the veterinarian may have received instructions on how to administer certain drugs at home. Some cat owners, on the other hand, may be uncomfortable with the idea of injecting medicine into their cats. Some drugs are available in tablet form, whilst others, such as insulin, must be taken by an injectable procedure. Subcutaneous medication is the technical word for this kind of drug, which refers to the fact that it is delivered beneath (sub-) the skin (cutaneous).

The needed location of the injection will dictate how you will administer the drug. Knowing how to securely administer subcutaneous medicine to your cat will assist you in reducing your stress levels while also keeping your cat happy and well.

  1. 1Make certain that your cat is properly hydrated. You must ensure that your cat is properly hydrated both prior to and after providing subcutaneous injections to him or her. The medicine you offer to your cat may not be completely absorbed if he or she is excessively dehydrated. Most healthy cats should not have a problem with this, but if you suspect your cat may be dehydrated, you should consult with your veterinarian about how to keep her well-hydrated at all times. 2 Choose the location where the injection will take place. You may want to hold the cat in your lap to keep her comfortable while the injection is being given, but doing so increases the likelihood that your cat will scratch or injure you, and it may cause her to associate being in your lap with receiving injections. If you do decide to hold the cat in your lap, it’s best to lay down a thick towel to protect your legs from the cat’s claws. The optimal place, on the other hand, is a flat surface, such as a table top
  2. 3 Select an acceptable injection site for your needs. You will need to choose a different injection site depending on whether you are administering a simple subcutaneous injection or an intramuscular injection. However, even within those restrictions, administering too many shots in the same area to your cat might cause difficulties for him. The reason for this is that the cat’s body takes between six and eight hours to completely absorb the fluids administered via injection. An edema is caused by administering an excessive amount of medication in one area before it has had time to be absorbed. This can cause discomfort for your cat, as well as prevent a significant amount of the medication you’re giving your cat from completing its course in its body.
  • In order to avoid the need to change injection sites, you should be able to deliver around five to ten milliliters of medicine per pound of body weight (or approximately 10 to 20 milliliters of medicine per kilogram of body weight) before changing injection sites. Check on your cat to see if the fluid injections are being properly absorbed by the body. The best way to accomplish this is to feel along the injection site, as well as around the belly below the injection site, because fluids tend to pool along the cat’s underbelly.
  1. 4Apply alcohol to the injection site using a cotton swab. Most cats will not require this step unless they have a severely damaged immune system in which case they will. It is important to note that eradicating bacteria is not the only advantage of using an alcohol swab
  2. Rubbing alcohol may also help hold your cat’s thick coat down flat, making it easier to view the skin while giving her an injection. 5Use food as a diversionary strategy. Give your cat a treat she really appreciates right before you deliver the injection, such as canned cat chow or tuna fish, to help her relax. As soon as she begins to consume the meal, lightly squeeze the area of her skin where the injection will be administered. After approximately five seconds, you should cease pinching and remove the food from the pinching area. Please return the food and pinch it a little more firmly this time around. Repeat this process until your cat gets tolerant of the pinching and maintains his or her attention on the food. This will assist you in preparing her for the injection and will help to decrease the discomfort and tension she feels when you administer the injection
  1. 1Look for an area of loose skin on your body. Generally speaking, the skin between the neck and the back of a cat is the loosest and most flexible of all the areas of skin on the cat. Hold the skin between your thumb and fingers, gently pinching the skin where it’s loosest, while distracting the cat with a piece of food. Skin tenting is the term used to describe this process, which should be similar to the appearance of an erected pup tent (also known as a shelter-half). 2 Insert the needle into the hole. The skin between your fingertips should be visible once you’ve firmly grasped the loose skin between your fingertips. It should be a small strip of skin between your thumb and index finger. Insert the needle into the strip of skin you’ve selected
  • At all times, the needle should be held parallel to the skin along the rear of your cat’s back. It’s possible that angling the needle will cause it to puncture through the skin and injure your finger. Keep your thumb away from the plunger until you are positive that the needle has been appropriately placed, then release it. It’s possible that holding the plunger while inserting the needle will induce an early injection if the cat flinches or if the needle is mistakenly put.
  • 3 Before injecting, pull the plunger back a little bit. To ensure that the drug is properly injected, it is critical that you slightly draw back on the plunger. To confirm that you’ve selected an appropriate injection location, you should perform this procedure.
  • When you draw back the plunger on the syringe, blood will flow into the syringe, indicating that you have struck a blood artery. After that, you will need to withdraw the needle and try again in a different location
  • If air bubbles appear in the syringe, this indicates that you have inserted the needle all the way through the pinched skin and have pulled in air from the surrounding area with the needle. This means you’ll have to withdraw the needle and try again, maybe in a new location
  • If no blood or air bubbles enter the syringe, you’ve reached a suitable spot and may proceed with the injection
  • Otherwise, you should stop.
  • 4 Inject the medicine into the vein. Make certain that you inject the entire amount of medication included in the syringe. Once the syringe has been entirely emptied, carefully withdraw the needle by moving along the same route that you used to inject it.
  • Hold the syringe between your index and middle fingers, then press down on the plunger with your thumb (on the same hand)
  1. 5Look for any signs of bleeding or leaking. Once you’ve finished the injection, you’ll need to inspect the site of the injection for any blood or medication that may have escaped through the needle hole. Use a clean cotton ball or tissue to apply pressure to the injection site until the discharge stops. If you notice blood or medication coming out of the injection site, call your doctor immediately! However, if your cat moves about excessively, this process may take more than one minute or so. 6Clean up after yourself and carefully dispose of the discarded needle. Syringes should not be disposed of in your domestic garbage since needles are considered biohazardous waste. Inquire with your veterinarian’s clinic to see whether they collect discarded needles for proper disposal. Never dispose of a needle that has not been properly capped since doing so might result in damage or infection to the rubbish collector or anyone else handling your garbage.
  1. 1 Locate the place of the injection. You should have received detailed instructions from your veterinarian on how to deliver injectable medicine, and you should carefully follow those recommendations. To begin with, most veterinarians recommend providing intramuscular injections into the quadricep muscles (cranial thigh), or into the lumbar spinal epaxial muscles (dorsal muscles along the spine) as a general rule.
  • When delivering intramuscular injections, use utmost caution to avoid any complications. A stray needle might cause irreversible nerve damage to your cat’s nervous system. As a result, it is essential that you adhere to any and all recommendations provided by your veterinarian. If you are unsure about any element of your veterinarian’s instructions, or if you are unable to locate the correct injection site at home, contact or see your veterinarian for more extensive information.
  • 2 Insert the needle into the hole. The needle should be positioned at an angle ranging between 45 and 90 degrees, depending on where the injection will be performed. It may be beneficial to keep your cat’s muscle flat in order to avoid movement and guarantee that the needle enters the muscle in the proper location.
  • Make certain that you place the needle at the correct angle, as advised by the veterinarian. Inserting the needle at an angle that is too shallow may prevent the injection from reaching the desired depth and entering the muscle. You should not place your thumb over the plunger of the syringe until you are confident that the needle has been placed correctly. It is possible that touching the plunger while inserting the needle will result in a premature injection if the cat flinches or if the needle is inserted incorrectly.
  • 3Pull the plunger all the way back before injecting. Just like you would when providing a subcutaneous injection, you’ll want to slightly draw back on the plunger prior to injecting the medication. When administering intramuscular injections, air bubbles should not be an issue
  • However, if you notice blood, you should remove the needle and try again, since this might signal that a blood vessel has been damaged. 4 Inject the drug into the vein. It is critical to confirm that the entire drug dosage included in the syringe has been administered. Once the syringe has been entirely empty, remove the needle from the syringe by using the same path that you used to insert the needle.
  • While holding the syringe between your index and middle fingers, press down on the plunger with your thumb (on the same hand)
  1. 5Look for any signs of bleeding or leaking. Examine the injection site for any signs of blood or medication leakage once you have finished the injection. If you notice evidence of blood or medication oozing from the injection site, apply pressure with a clean cotton ball or tissue to the location of the injection. If the pressure is applied correctly, it should only take approximately one minute for the bleeding or leakage to stop. 6 Dispose of the needle in the right manner. Uncapped or uncapped syringes should never be disposed of in domestic trash or left in the garbage since they are considered a biohazard. Inquire with your veterinarian’s clinic to see whether they collect spent needles for disposal.
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  • The most effective method of recapping a needle is to place the cap on the ground or on a counter and scoop the cap up with the needle and thread it through the needle. This keeps you from sticking yourself when you’re recounting the conversation. Remember, if you are not confident enough to administer an injection to your cat, you may always get assistance from your local veterinarian. Prior to placing your cat in a restraint, prepare the syringe by filling it with water. Keep the syringe near by on a table or counter so that you can readily reach it when you’re ready to use it. If your cat is being tough, don’t chastise him. Keep in mind that this cat is completely unaware that you are assisting them. Provide comfort to them and speak in a calm tone
  • After you’re through, they may flee, but allow them some time.
  • If you are administering an insulin injection, make certain that the vial is not shaken prior to drawing out the medication. Instead, gently agitate and warm it by rolling it between your palms. What ever you do, don’t let her get away with the needle still stuck in her skin
  • It might cause harm if it falls out or she attempts to remove it. If the cat tries to pull away, whatever you do, don’t let her get away with the needle still stuck in her skin. When handling syringes, exercise caution. Because of the way you use a syringe, it’s possible that you’ll accidentally puncture yourself or accidentally inject the drug into your hand. Make certain that used needles are disposed away correctly. Inquire with your veterinarian’s clinic to see whether they collect discarded syringes for disposal. Never dispose of an uncapped needle in the garbage since doing so might result in damage and illness to anybody who handles or collects the trash.

Things You’ll Need

  • A clean, unused syringe
  • The drug
  • And a clean, unused needle. Cotton balls that have been cleaned
  • Rubbing alcohol In a small dish, put some cat food

About This Article

To give a cat a subcutaneous injection, start by identifying a loose piece of skin, such as the skin between its neck and back, and gently squeezing it between your thumb and fingers using your thumb and forefinger. Article SummaryX It’s possible that you’ll need to distract the cat with food while you’re doing this. Insert the needle into the tiny strip of skin between your thumb and fingertip, maintaining the needle parallel to your cat’s back the entire time. As soon as you’re ready, pull back on the plunger a little before injecting the entire amount of medicine remaining in the syringe.

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  • When administered at home, the majority of injectable drugs are supplied by injection directly beneath the skin (known as subcutaneous injection). Do not put yourself in danger of being bitten, scratched, or otherwise damaged by your pet while attempting to treat him. Other methods may be available if you are unable to give medicine. Consult with your veterinarian for more information. It is the responsibility of your veterinarian health care team to ensure that you understand how to administer injectable medicine without harming yourself or your cat.

What is the reason for my cat’s need for injectable medication? A number of drugs, such as insulin, can only be supplied by an injectable procedure. Injectable drugs can be administered by a variety of methods, depending on the formulation and the kind of medication. They can be administered by a variety of routes, including direct injection into a vein (known as intravenous, orIV injection), injection into a muscle (known as intramuscular, orIMinjection), or injection directly beneath the skin (known as subcutaneous, orSC, or SQ, injection), among others.

If you administer an injectable medication incorrectly, difficulties may occur.

Getting Things Started Before you begin, consult with your veterinarian for instruction and guidance on how to safely administer injectable medicine to your cat without harming yourself or your cat.

Some considerations to keep in mind are as follows:

  • Make certain that you are capable of handling your cat without being damaged. Your cat may not be bothered by this if he or she is extremely easygoing and used to being handled. If, on the other hand, you have had difficulty in the past trying to trim your cat’s nails or conduct other treatments on him, you may require assistance administering medication through injection. Before undertaking your first session, consult with your veterinarian for advice on how to appropriately confine your cat for medicine injections. In rare situations, you may require the assistance of another person to hold your cat while you administer the injection securely. Don’t be scared to ask any queries you may have. Your team of veterinary specialists would be happy to answer any concerns you may have regarding providing medicine injections to your cat in a safe and effective manner. Make a note of your cat’s medication routine on a calendar or notepad. Include the date and time when the drug will need to be administered in the prescription. This will assist you with avoiding forgetting to give your cat a dosage and in remembering when the course of medication is complete, among other things. If you are unable to complete the task, inquire about alternative possibilities. Giving pharmaceutical injections to a cat needs expertise, patience, and confidence on the part of the person administering them. Whether you are not comfortable administering injections at home, speak with your veterinarian’s team to see if the injections may be administered in the veterinarian’s office instead. Especially for long-term therapies (such as insulin), this may entail a significant time commitment. Outpatient injections, on the other hand, might be a highly convenient alternative when it comes to short-term medicine.

Equipment for the most part The “syringe” is the transparent (typically plastic) cylinder that contains the drug that will be injected into the patient. The “needle” refers to the sharp, metal point that is inserted into the skin during the procedure. The “plunger” is a stem that travels within the syringe as the needle is inserted. Fill the syringe by pulling the plunger backward, then empty the syringe by pushing the plunger forward. Unopened, a fresh needle/plunger and syringe are both sterile until they are used for the first time.

  1. It is critical to treat these goods with care in order to prevent them from being contaminated.
  2. For each injection, make sure you use a fresh syringe, plunger, and needle to avoid contamination.
  3. Besides that, a worn needle is dull and consequently more unpleasant to use than a new needle is new.
  4. If your cat attempts to jump down, you should throw a towel or blanket over your lap (to avoid being scratched) to protect yourself from being scratched.
  5. The surface of a washing machine may be used to replicate the flat metal table at your veterinarian’s office, which will help your cat to remain still during the treatment.

Subcutaneous Injections are given under the skin. Before you are required to administer an injection on your own at home, your veterinary care staff will demonstrate how to do so:

  • Fill the syringe with medication while maintaining cleanliness, and keep it near by at hand
  • Locate an area of loose skin on your body. Generally, the skin above the center of the back or right behind the shoulders is the best bet for this. Consider alternating injection sites if the injection is going to be administered often (like with insulin), so that you aren’t utilizing the same area each time. Pinch a portion of loose skin between your thumb and fingers in a gentle manner. After gently pulling the loose skin upwards with your fingertips, you should see a little indentation of skin between your fingers. Placing the sterile needle straight into the depression while holding the syringe in the other hand is recommended. Keep the needle level (or parallel) with the surface of the skin on the back of your hand as you insert it into the skin. If you angle the needle too much, you may accidentally penetrate a muscle, pass through the skin to the other side, or stick your own finger in the needle. After the needle has been placed, only the plunger should be pulled back. If you notice any blood, withdraw the needle and try again in a new area. To empty the syringe if it is not already empty, press the plunger forward. When the syringe is completely empty, remove the needle by backing it out along the same path as it was used to penetrate the skin
  • And Upon determining that there is no bleeding or medicine leaking, release the cat after showering him or her with affection for being such a wonderful patient. Please make sure that used needles and syringes are properly disposed of.

An intramuscular injection is administered. Intramuscular injections are most typically given in a few specific locations on the body. These locations are described below. You’ll need to look for “landmarks” on your cat’s body so that you know just where to administer the shot. The members of your veterinary care team will demonstrate how to locate an acceptable injection site and deliver an intramuscular injection before you are required to practice on your own at home:

  • Fill the syringe with medication while maintaining cleanliness, and keep it near by at hand
  • Locate the injection location by following the procedures that your veterinarian explained to you before. If the injection will be administered on a regular basis, attempt to vary the injection sites so that you are not utilizing the same spot each time. Placing the syringe in one hand and inserting the sterilized needle directly through the skin and into the underlying muscle is the procedure. The needle should be angled at an angle ranging from 45° to 90°, depending on where it is being used. Using a shallow angle may result in your injecting too shallowly and not deep enough to penetrate a muscle. After the needle has been placed, only the plunger should be pulled back. If you notice any blood, withdraw the needle and try again in a new area. To empty the syringe if it is not already empty, press the plunger forward. When the syringe is completely empty, remove the needle by backing it out along the same path as it was used to penetrate the skin
  • And Upon determining that there is no bleeding or medicine leaking, release the cat after showering him or her with affection for being such a wonderful patient. Please make sure that used needles and syringes are properly disposed of.

Inquire with your veterinarian staff about how to securely deliver medicine injections. If you are uncomfortable administering injections, inquire about scheduling outpatient sessions where the injections can be administered instead.

How to Give a Cat a Shot

The most recent update was made on September 4, 2019. Dr. Marty Greer, Director of Veterinary Services at Revival, demonstrates step-by-step how to administer an injection to a cat. It is possible to utilize this procedure to administer an insulin injection, a feline immunization, or any other form of shot beneath the skin to a cat. If you want assistance, please contact us at 800.786.4751.

Video Transcript

What is the most convenient location to administer a cat vaccination? Hello, my name is Doctor Greer, and I work as the Director of Veterinary Services for Revival Animal Health. A cat’s immunization can be administered in two locations: the back of the neck or the lower leg. Giving a cat a vaccine in the scruff of the neck, as some people have heard, can result in Sarcoma, which is a cancerous growth in the neck. In fact, this is only half correct. It is more often than not the leukemia and rabies vaccinations that are the source of the problem, rather than the FVR-CP distemper immunizations.

  • I also propose putting the cat in a laundry basket to keep him safe.
  • Allowing the cat to concentrate on your special food reward while you gently raise up the skin over the cat’s right or left shoulder is the best way to administer an injection to a cat’s neck.
  • This region has thicker skin, which makes it difficult for the drug or vaccination to be properly absorbed into the body.
  • Lift a little amount of the loose skin on the bottom portion of your cat’s outer leg to form a small tent, and carefully enter the needle, taking care not to put it into your finger or through the other side of the skin.
  • Pull back on the plunger of the syringe prior to injecting to ensure that you are not injecting into a blood vessel or out the other side of the skin, and then proceed to inject.
  • Was this information useful?
  • The materials, information, and answers offered on this website are not meant to be a substitute for the medical advice or services provided by your own veterinarian or other qualified pet health care expert in your area.

Answers to particular medical problems, such as diagnosis, treatment, therapy, or medical attention, should be sought from your personal veterinarian in person.

How to Vaccinate a Cat: 13 Steps (with Pictures)

Vaccinations are essential for protecting cats against infections that are preventable and infectious in nature. However, before you can successfully vaccinate your cat at home, you must first understand how to do it safely and properly. In addition to reducing stress on the cat, administering the vaccine in the cat’s home environment can help to lower the cost of the vaccination at the veterinarian. Cat owners also have greater freedom when it comes to picking the time of their cat’s immunizations, rather than having to attempt to fit their calendar around the schedule of the veterinarian’s office.

  1. 1 Consult with your veterinarian. Ask your veterinarian about the vaccinations that are suggested for your location and the age of your cat. Check to see which vaccines you are legally permitted to give at home and which vaccines may only be delivered by a registered veterinarian. Inquire about the vaccines your cat need in light of its medical history.
  • The administration of some vaccinations, like as the rabies immunization, is governed by law and must be performed by a veterinarian.
  • 2 Determine where the vaccination should be physically injected. Learn about the places where you can administer cat immunizations at home, according to the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP). In order to maximize the efficiency of the immunizations, they are administered in different regions of the cat’s body.
  • Vaccination against feline leukemia is delivered through the outside of the left rear leg. It is advised that the feline 3-way or 4-way combination vaccinations that do not contain the feline leukemia vaccine be administered on the outer region of the right foreleg. Rabies is administered subcutaneously (just beneath the surface of the skin) on the outside of the right rear leg.
  • Three, familiarize yourself and your pet with the immunization area. If you want to provide your cat’s immunizations in a room that it does not regularly visit, allow it some time to become acclimated to the environment before administering the doses themselves. Carry out this procedure a few days before the event to assist in keeping your cat quiet and comfortable. Make sure your cat is in the place you intend to use for the immunization procedure and that you are interacting with him or her as you normally would.
  • This will assist you in keeping your cat calmer throughout the actual immunization process.
  • 4 Gather all of your materials. Your veterinarian can prescribe or order the immunizations required for your cat from a trustworthy pet vaccination supply company. In order to save money, vaccines can be obtained in several doses. Be sure to just order what you need.
  • Remember to keep the vaccine refrigerated until you are ready to administer it. Temperatures ranging between 2 °C (36 °F) and 7 °C (45 °F) should be suitable
  • 5 Make a list of the immunizations you’ll need before capturing the cat. Some immunizations may need to be combined together before they can be administered to the cat. Two vials will be used to provide these vaccines. Draw the liquid from the first vial into a syringe and inject it into the second vial, which is normally containing a little amount of powder in the bottom of the container. Shaking the container will help to combine the ingredients. To inject the cat, re-draw the entire mixture into the syringe and inject it.
  • Certain vaccinations are administered through the cat’s nose without the need of a needle, while some vaccines must be blended before administering to a cat. Remove the cap from the vial containing the liquid and, using the attached eye dropper, extract all of the liquid from the vial and place it in the second vial containing the powder
  • 6 Make the immunization area ready to go. Make sure that the vaccines you have prepared are on a table that is within easy reach of the place where you will vaccinate the cat. Get a hold of your cat and take it to the immunization area. Make an effort to pet your cat in an encouraging manner in order to comfort it and keep it calm
  • Prepare an after-vaccination treat for your cat to offer it after it has been vaccinated.
  1. 1 Prepare yourself for the start of the game. Place your cat on the table and maintain your composure. If your cat detects that you are worried or panicked, he or she will not remain calm. Recruit a second person to assist you in restraining the cat, and place it between the two of you. Maintain control of the cat so that it does not jerk its body around or flee. It’s possible that you’ll have difficulty capturing it the second time.
  • Position yourself near the cat’s right shoulder to ensure that you have the best possible access to the immunization spot.
  • 2 Insert the needle into the hole. Remove the cap from the needle and gently squeeze and raise the skin at the injection site to ensure that the injection is successful. You must make certain that your cat remains calm so that you do not accidently harm them with the needle
  • When you first put the needle, draw it back a little to make sure you are not in a blood vessel or any other structure. If you are, blood will be drawn from the syringe and returned to it. Immediately remove the needle and re-insert it if this is the case.
  • 3 Using the palm of your hand, depress the plunger and administer the vaccination to the kitten. When you’re finished, carefully remove the needle from the cat’s skin, place the needle and needle cover in a disposal receptacle designated for sharp items, and throw away the syringe, as needed.
  • Make certain that your cat receives the entire dose of immunization liquid. Giving your cat a partial immunization therapy like this might cause your cat to develop resistant to the drug, and if your cat is unable to fight off the disease, he or she could get seriously ill.
  • 4 Intranasal vaccines should be administered. Use your free hand to grasp the cat’s paws and gently tilt its head back while administering an intranasal immunization. To administer medicine, use an eye dropper to place half of the drug in each nostril.
  • Make certain that the medicine is distributed evenly in each nostril and that the cat receives the whole prescribed amount.
  1. 1 Give your cat a gentle stroke and a treat. Having said that, try to be extra lovely to your cat and offer it some extra attention and care when everything is said and done. Extra cuddles for your cat will let it understand that you are there to protect it as well as to make it feel better.
  • Giving your cat a treat may even be beneficial, since it may help your cat forget about the unpleasant experience it just had.
  • 2 For many hours, keep an eye on your cat. Make sure it doesn’t cause any negative side effects such as tiredness, pain, vomiting, diarrhea, or face swelling before using it. After the vaccine, your cat should be OK (if not a bit sluggish) and comfortable. Consequently, if you detect anything out of the ordinary in its behavior, call your veterinarian promptly
  • Try to spend some time with your cat following the vaccine so that you can keep an eye out for any unpleasant responses.
  • Consult with your veterinary professional 3 Even if this is your first time vaccinating your cat at home, your veterinarian may be a valuable source of knowledge and assistance for you. Contact your veterinarian if you have any questions about how to administer the immunization or how your cat is reacting to the vaccination after it has been administered.
  • Following a vaccination, it is common for cats to be a bit drowsy or sluggish for around 24 hours following the vaccination. However, if your cat appears to be lethargic and less active than usual for more than 24 hours after receiving the vaccination, you should consider speaking with your veterinarian about it.
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Video

  • Take note of any changes in the pet’s behavior after receiving the medication. Be on the lookout for any rashes, skin allergies, or other abnormalities.

Things You’ll Need

  • Vaccinations
  • One syringe and one needle are required for each vaccination. Treats for cats

About this article

Thank you to all writers for contributing to this page, which has been read 35,897 times so far.

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Because James has provided you with excellent technical instruction, I’m going to concentrate on the psychology aspect of the game – specifically, your psychology rather than Norbert’s. First and foremost, I’d like you to understand that this will be a far less significant event for Norbert than it will be for you. Even though I’m not a medical professional (nurse, vet, or anything), during the course of my life, I’ve administered injections to humans, cats, dogs, and even alpacas. Animals appear to be unmoved by the rounds that are fired at them.

  • I believe that injections are far less distressing for animals than tablets.
  • Norbert will take his cues from your actions or inactions.
  • Maintain a regular and comfortable breathing pattern.
  • I want to incorporate a ceremony throughout the entire procedure so that the animal is aware of what is about to take place.
  • It is more calm for Norbert to know that a shot is about to be fired than to being surprised by the situation.
  • If you shower Norbert with attention throughout the procedure, he may not even see the photograph!
  • This will assist you in keeping him calm as you grip the sking and deliver the shot to his head.

Cat Injections: Training Your Cat to Love Injections Without Ruining Your Relationship

Dr. Sophia Yin contributed to this article. We initially administered the insulin, but Mochi quickly retreated and began to hide from us. We didn’t want to make her resent us, so we decided to stop the therapy even though we knew she wouldn’t survive long if we didn’t. How many times have you heard a story like this, when a client refuses to continue with therapy because the treatment is causing her to lose her attachment with her dog or cat.

Because it is simple to learn cats to enjoy having injections and because this comfort with injections may be taught in a matter of days, this type of situation should not occur if the therapy involves an injection in some way. Here’s how to do it.

Start with a hungry cat and tasty treats, such as canned cat food or baby food. Then give the cat the food and once she starts eating it, lightly pinch her skin. The goal is that you pinch at a level light enough so she remains engrossed in the food. Stop the pinching after about 5 seconds and simultaneously pull the food away. If you do this right, the cat should be looking at you expectantly to offer the food again. This timing helps cats understand that pinching equals treats and removal of the pinching equals removal of food. Next repeat the procedure. Once she’s good at being pinched at your starting level repeat the procedure but pinch harder or more vigorously.
Once she is happy to just eat treats during that procedure, then graduate to poking with a capped needle on a syringe while you pinch the skin. You can use a pen instead if you don’t have a needle and syringe on hand. Again, only poke the skin when the cats eating. Only poke for around 5 seconds so you don’t go over her tolerance level when first starting at this step. Then stop petting and remove the food. Here, Dante can’t wait for me to repeat the procedure. At this point I can use a real syringe and needle and give an injection.
You can also perform this procedure with an assistant to hold the food. Make sure you’ve timed the removal and addition of food carefully.

Make a point of practicing in a couple of 5-minute intervals per day. Consider practicing immediately before her usual meal times and use a piece of her food as a practice resource. The program is simple to implement, and most cats can finish it in a matter of days if you keep your stress levels below the threshold that will upset him. As a result, after only a few training sessions, your cat will be prepared to take injectible drugs that will help her live a longer and better life. The following video shows a cat receiving a rabies vaccination at a rabies vaccination facility….

If so, have you taught your cat how to accept injections?

In this article we will discuss the following topics: cat, cats, counter conditioning, injections, low stress handling, immunizations, vet care, veterinarian care.

Injecting your cat – Bishops Stortford Vets

Giving medications through the parenteral route is a term used to describe the administration of medicine through injection. The oral route is the second most common method of giving medicine, and it involves the mouth and digestive system. The delivery of medication is a critical component of the majority of veterinary therapies, and many drugs are most effective when administered intravenously. In addition, for some medications, such as insulin, which are damaged by stomach acids, the administration of medicine via injection is required.

  • Body cavities, such as the abdominal cavity (known as intraperitoneal injection) or the thoracic cavity (known as intrapleural injection)
  • Bone (intraosseous injection)
  • Tissue beneath the skin (subcutaneous injection)
  • Veins (intravenous injection)
  • And the skin (intradermal injection).

Injection methods are frequently denoted by abbreviations, such as IM for intramuscular, SC or SQ for subcutaneous, and so on. This brief will only cover the intramuscular and subcutaneous methods of administration because these are the approaches that cat owners are most likely to come across. When delivering injections, it is essential to employ clean practices at all times. If the coat is very filthy, it should be cut and thoroughly cleaned. Skin should be swabbed with alcohol before applying makeup.

  • Different injectable formulations are utilized for the various routes of administration, and it is especially crucial not to deliver an injection straight into the bloodstream unless it is explicitly indicated for this route of administration.
  • It is relatively straightforward to take a flap of skin from a domesticated animal and introduce a needle into the subcutaneous tissue since domesticated animals have a lot of loose skin.
  • For example, owners of diabetic animals can be trained how to deliver insulin subcutaneously so that they can provide frequent injections to their pet at home, which saves them time and money.
  • Because muscle tissue has a good blood supply, drugs injected into it are absorbed extremely fast.
  • Injection into muscle tissue carries a certain amount of danger due to the presence of several vital systems such as arteries, veins, and nerves that run through the muscle tissue.
  • Gentle suction should be provided to the syringe immediately after the needle has been placed into a muscle to ensure that blood does not flow back into the needle.

When administering injections under the skin, the same procedure can be utilized, however the likelihood of a blood vessel being penetrated in this case is much lower. The following are the appropriate places for intramuscular injection:

  • The quadriceps muscle (located on the front of the thigh)
  • The lumbodorsal muscles (located on either side of the lumbar spine)
  • The triceps muscle (located behind the humerus (arm bone) on the front leg)
  • And the hamstrings (located on the back of the thigh).
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In general, hamstrings (the muscles at the back of the thigh) should not be worked out since there is a risk of damaging the crucial sciatic nerve that passes through this part of the body. In cats, injection volumes should not be greater than 2 milliliters. In comparison to subcutaneous injections, intramuscular injections are more painful. Even while proper technique reduces the likelihood of this happening, many animals will respond to the injection. A good action for the insertion of needles into muscles is that it minimizes muscular damage and pain, and rubbing the injection site thereafter disperses the injection and may aid in the reduction of discomfort.

  1. Even though owners are not frequently requested to administer intramuscular injections, it is possible that they will be asked to hold their pet while it receives one.
  2. The other injectable methods described above are mostly utilized in hospitalized animals and are administered by those who have received specialized training in doing so.
  3. Areas of the cat’s leg that have been shaved or trimmed generally indicate where an intravenous injection has been administered.
  4. Intranasal vaccinations, such as those used to prevent kennel cough in dogs, are administered through the nose, allowing the live virus to penetrate the lining of the nose.
  5. Although it is not necessary to breathe the medicine itself when using nebulized drugs, the patient must do so in order to receive treatment.
  6. When a person is in cardiac arrest, adrenaline is occasionally supplied through an endotracheal tube since absorption is quick and the approach is significantly safer than the alternative, intracardiac adrenaline administration.
  7. It is simple to penetrate two layers of skin, resulting in the medicine being applied to the coat rather than being absorbed into the skin.

If any may have been received, it is best not to provide any more at this point in time.

It is critical that needles have their protective caps firmly reinstalled after usage in order to avoid someone from being harmed.

When administering injections, disposable gloves are a practical precaution to take.

Some business owners choose not to wear gloves because they believe it makes them appear more uncomfortable.

Then, for 5 minutes, thoroughly wash your finger with soap and water, ideally using a gentle nail brush on the afflicted region to get rid of any remaining soap residue.

Apply a bandage to the skin once it has been dried. For guidance, you should speak with both your veterinarian and your doctor at once. It is important to note that any long-term impact is extremely improbable.

Administering Injectable Medication to Your Cat

In general, hamstrings (the muscles at the back of the thigh) should not be exercised since there is a risk of damaging the crucial sciatic nerve that passes through this part of the body. It is recommended that cats not get injections larger than 2 mL in volume. In comparison to subcutaneous injections, intramuscular injections are more uncomfortable. Even though proper technique reduces the likelihood of this happening, many animals will respond negatively to the injection still. Inserting needles into muscles has a favorable effect on muscular damage and pain reduction, and rubbing the injection site thereafter disperses the injection and may assist in pain reduction.

  • Even though owners are not frequently requested to administer intramuscular injections, it is possible that they will be asked to hold their pet while it receives an injection.
  • They are mostly utilized in hospitalized animals and are administered by veterinarians who have received specialized training in their administration.
  • When an intravenous injection has been administered to a cat, it is common to see shaved or cut portions on its leg.
  • If you give your dog an intranasal vaccination for kennel cough, the live virus is injected directly into his nose, where it might infect him and spread the disease.
  • Although it is not necessary to breathe the medicine itself when using nebulized pharmaceuticals, the patient must do so in order to get the medication.
  • Nebulized medications can be supplied using a face mask.
  • While learning to give injections, it is possible that you could experience discomfort, especially if you are using the ultra-fine, ultra-sharp needles used to administer insulin.

The injection can be repeated if you are 100% certain that the cat did not get any drugs.

Consult with your veterinarian for guidance on this matter.

Sharps boxes should be used for the safe storage of used needles and syringes, which should be returned to the veterinary office when they have been safely discarded.

These may be available for purchase from your veterinarian office in bulk, which will be more cost-effective than purchasing them from a pharmacy or other retailer.

Then remove the needle and syringe from the danger zone and carefully cap them.

Using a bandage, secure the wound. Please consult with your veterinarian, as well as with your physician, for guidance. It is important to note that any long-term consequences are extremely improbable.

Why Does My Cat Need Injectable Medication?

A number of drugs, such as insulin, can only be supplied by an injectable procedure. The majority of injectable medications administered at home are administered subcutaneously (also known as a SC or SQ injection), which means that the medication is injected directly beneath the skin. Many others can be administered through an IV (intravenous) or through a muscle (myocardial infarction) (intramuscular, or IM injection). If you’re not sure which type of injection you should give your pet, consult your veterinarian.

Getting Started

Before you begin, consult with your veterinarian health care team for guidance and instruction on how to administer the medication, as well as suggestions for avoiding damage (to you and your cat). Don’t be hesitant to seek for help if you’re still feeling uncomfortable or if you need extra training sessions. Some considerations to keep in mind are as follows:

  • Make certain that you are capable of handling your cat without being damaged. Your cat may not be bothered by this if he or she is extremely easygoing and used to being handled. However, if you are having difficulty trimming your cat’s nails or doing other treatments on him, you may require assistance with the injections. Your veterinarian can provide guidance on how to appropriately confine your cat in preparation for the shots. In rare situations, you may require the assistance of another person to hold your cat while you administer the injection securely. Don’t be scared to ask any queries you may have. Your team of veterinary specialists would be happy to answer any concerns you may have regarding providing needles to your cat in a safe and effective manner. Make a note of your cat’s medication routine on a calendar or notepad. Include the day and time when the medicine will need to be given. This will prevent you from forgetting to take a dosage and will aid you in remembering when your therapy is finished. If you are unable to complete the task, inquire about alternative possibilities. Giving shots to a cat demands a high level of competence, patience, and trust. Request that the injections be performed in your veterinarian’s office if you are not comfortable administering the medication. When it comes to short-term medicine, this can be a viable alternative
  • But, if your cat is on long-term medication (such as insulin), this may necessitate a significant time commitment.

Basic Equipment

It is the transparent cylinder that contains the drug that is to be administered that is known as the syringe. In most cases, it’s constructed of plastic. The needle is the sharp, metal tip that is inserted into the skin during the injection process. The plunger is a stem that slides within the syringe as the needle is inserted. Fill the syringe by pulling the plunger backward, then empty the syringe by pushing the plunger forward. A fresh needle, plunger, and syringe are all sterile until they are used, and the same is true for the drug.

Your veterinary care staff will demonstrate how to open a syringe and draw up medication without jeopardizing the sterility of the drug.

In addition, a used needle is dull, causing your cat greater discomfort than a new needle throughout the procedure.

Proper Restraint

A few cats will be quite content to lie down or sit on your lap while you deliver the injections. However, you should drape a towel or blanket over your lap to prevent yourself from being scratched if your cat attempts to leap down from the couch. The behavior of certain cats is improved when they are on a flat surface such as a table. The smooth metal surface at the veterinarian’s office may be replicated by placing the cat on top of the washing machine, which will encourage the cat to stay as motionless as possible during the process.

Giving a Subcutaneous Injection

Before you are required to administer an injection on your own at home, your veterinarian care staff will demonstrate how to do so. However, the following procedures should be followed:

  • Fill the syringe with medicine and keep it near by for easy access. Locate an area of loose skin on your body. Generally, the skin above the center of the back or right behind the shoulders is the best bet for this. Especially if the injection will be given often, such as with insulin, avoid using the same site for each administration. Pinch the skin between your thumb and forefinger in a gentle manner. Using gentle upward pressure, pull the loose skin upward and check for a little indentation of skin between your fingertips
  • The other hand should be used to pick up the syringe and place the sterilized needle straight into the depression. Maintain a parallel relationship between the needle and the surface of the skin on the back. It is possible to penetrate a muscle, travel through the skin to the opposite side, or even stick your own finger if you slant the needle too far. After the needle has been placed, only the plunger should be pulled back. If you notice any blood, withdraw the needle and try again in a new area. If there is no blood in the syringe, press the plunger forward to empty it completely. When the syringe is completely empty, withdraw the needle by backing it out along the same path that was used to penetrate the skin
  • Check the region for bleeding or medicine leaking
  • Repeat the process if necessary. If this is discovered, gently press on the affected region with a clean face tissue or cotton ball for a minute or two using gentle pressure. Upon determining that there is no bleeding or medicine leaking, release the cat after showering her with affection for being such a wonderful patient! Make careful to properly dispose of discarded needles and syringes, following the instructions provided by your veterinarian.

Giving an Intramuscular Injection

Intramuscular injections are most effective when administered to a few specific regions of the body.

Before you have to attempt it on your own at home, your veterinarian care team will explain you how to select an acceptable injection site and give the drug, but here are the steps to remember:

  • Fill the syringe with medicine and keep it near at hand for easy access
  • Locate the injection location by following the procedures that your veterinarian explained to you before. If the injection will be administered on a regular basis, attempt to vary the injection location. Take hold of the syringe with one hand and carefully put the sterile needle right through the skin and into the underlying muscle with the other. The needle should be angled at an angle ranging from 45° to 90°, depending on where it is being used. Using a shallow angle may result in your injecting too shallowly and not deep enough to penetrate a muscle. After the needle has been placed, only the plunger should be pulled back. If you notice any blood, withdraw the needle and try again in a new area. To empty the syringe if it is not already empty, press the plunger forward. The needle should be removed by backing out along the path that was used to enter the skin after the syringe is completely empty. Examine the region for signs of bleeding or medicine leaking. If this is discovered, gently press on the affected region with a clean face tissue or cotton ball for a minute or two using gentle pressure. Upon determining that there is no bleeding or medicine leaking, release the cat after showering her with affection for being such a wonderful patient! Make careful to properly dispose of discarded needles and syringes, following the instructions provided by your veterinarian.

Whenever you have any concerns or queries, you should contact your veterinarian’s office immediately. A veterinarian has reviewed and approved the content of this article.

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