How To Acclimate A Cat To A New Home

Cats and Moving to a New Home: Making the Transition

Moving is one of the most disruptive life transitions that can occur, and this is true for both humans and their dogs. Cats are naturally resistant to change, which may make moving day a difficult experience for everyone involved. When it comes time to pack up your belongings and relocate, you may take efforts to make the change for your cat as smooth as possible. Keeping them quiet and comfortable is the ultimate objective. This will assist you in avoiding messes, meowing, aggressiveness, and attempted escapes from your cat.

Preparing Your Cat to Move

Information should be up to date. Make certain that your cat’s identification collar is safe and up to date. Prior to moving, it is recommended that you microchip your cat to avoid the possibility that they would become afraid and run away. When you keep your microchip information up to date, reunions are far more probable. Create a “new normal” in your life. Maintain as much of your cat’s typical routine as possible in the weeks leading up to the relocation. Cats might get stressed by the unexpected presence of new individuals and moving things, as well as the departure of their favorite furniture or objects.

This aids in the creation of a new usual environment for your cat.

  • Introduce the cat carrier to the scene.
  • Select a carrier that is well-secured, well-designed for travel, and comfortable for your child.
  • Fill the carrier with sweets, a beloved blanket, and familiar toys to help your child develop pleasant associations with the carrier.
  • As the packing and moving operations grow more frenetic, placing the carrier in a peaceful location will encourage the cat to seek sanctuary there.

Moving Your Cat

While people are moving into and out of your present residence on the big day, keep your cat safely contained in the carrier. If your relocation involves a lengthy road journey, be certain that your cat is accustomed to traveling in a carrier. It may be tempting, but resist the temptation to open your carrier in the middle of the journey to calm your cat. Because of this, your cat is more likely to make a break for it in unknown surroundings.

Continued

Once you’ve arrived, keep your cat safely contained in their carrier while you cat-proof your new house. Close any windows and doors, and tuck away any electrical cables or plugs that your cat may get tangled in if you don’t want him to become caught. First, introduce one room at a time. Choose a room that has things and furnishings that you are familiar with. Allow your cat to come out of the carrier and explore the room after the area has been secured. Keep your cat in a single room when there is a lot of activity in the new house for his or her own safety and security.

Make a time to quietly spend time with your cat in their temporary area to assist them in becoming used to their new surroundings. If your cat appears to be apprehensive, you may want to confine them to a single room for a few days to allow them adequate time to become used to the new environment.

Things to Look Out For

Cats that have gotten away. When a cat is relocated to a new region, it is usual for him to seek to return to his old haunts to relieve himself. Always keep your cat indoors at all times for his or her own safety. Even if you want to let your cat to go outside at some point, keep them indoors until you are certain that they have connected with their new environment. It is preferable to confine your cat to the house for a minimum of two weeks. You may help your cat form good associations with your new house by feeding him more frequently with small meals and include more treats and playtime in his day than he would otherwise get.

  • For starters, call the cat in after ten minutes and gradually increase the amount of time you spend outside.
  • In the event that you decide to let your cat to roam the neighborhood, remain watchful and listen for the noises of a catfight.
  • Events that are stressful.
  • Ensure that your cat remains indoors, safe, and secure in their new home by taking additional measures.

How to Introduce a Cat to a New Home

Are you thinking of bringing in a new feline companion? Keep in mind that you are exposing them to a whole new environment, and it may take them some time to acclimatize. With a little thinking and preparation, you can assist your whiskered buddy in making the change as painless as possible.

Look into Adoption

Thousands of gorgeous cats and kittens are now residing in animal shelters around the country, hoping to be adopted into loving homes. If you’re considering about bringing a new cat into your house, please think about adopting from this worthy group of cats. You may browse the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals’ nationwide database to find cats and kittens available for adoption at shelters near you. They have a shelter in Manhattan that you may visit if you reside in or around the New York City region.

If you’re interested in learning more about adopting a cat or kitten, you may read Bringing Home a New Kitten, which covers everything from the adoption procedure to basic kitten care.

Spay or Neuter, Please!

Lastly, while we’re on the subject of adoption and animal shelters, please make sure your new cat or kitten has been spayed or neutered to prevent adding to the cat overpopulation problem by producing an unexpected litter. There are several health and behavioral benefits to having your cat spayed or neutered, including helping to avoid some forms of cancer and decreasing mating habits such as howling and trying to flee from the safety of your home while your cat is in heat.

Taking in a Stray Cat

Lastly, while we’re on the subject of adoption and animal shelters, please make sure your new cat or kitten has been spayed or neutered to prevent adding to the cat overpopulation crisis by having an unplanned litter.

There are several health and behavioral benefits to having your cat spayed or neutered, including helping to avoid some forms of cancer and decreasing mating habits such as howling or trying to flee from the safety of your home while your cat is in heat.

New Cat Checklist

Wherever you got your new feline from, you’ll want to make sure you have all of the necessary cat supplies on hand. This checklist will assist you in ensuring that you have everything you require.

  • Brand-name cat food — If you’re overwhelmed by the number of options, see your veterinarian for advice. Ensure that the food dish and water bowl are clean at all times, as well as that fresh water is constantly accessible. Playthings that are safe for cats are a terrific way to keep your cat active and interested. Make your own with common home things, such as ping pong balls or empty paper bags, or get some from a store
  • Clawing Post — This is an absolute must-have if you want to prevent your cat from scratching up your furniture. A comb or brush should be used to groom cats, as they perform most of their grooming themselves. However, brushing is necessary to keep their coat in good condition, prevent shedding, and reduce the amount of hairballs
  • Wearing a collar and ID tag is recommended for all cats, including those who live inside all of the time. Make sure to attach an ID tag with current contact information to their collar. In addition, you may wish to consider microchipping your kitty companion. Place the litter box in a semi-private area that your cat may readily reach. Clumping litter should be used in conjunction with the litter box. Scoop it out at least once a day, and totally clean it out once a week
  • The use of a soft, comfortable pet bed can assist keep your cat out of locations where you’d prefer them not to sleep and away from all that fur.

Choosing a Vet for Your Cat

You’ll need to contact a veterinarian as soon as possible – preferably before you bring your new cat home. As a result, you’ll know who to call if your furry buddy becomes ill or injured unexpectedly. It’s important to remember that even cats that live only inside can get injuries. Aside from that, your cat will require regular checkups, yearly dental cleanings, vaccinations, and other normal preventative care. These therapies can help cats live longer, healthier, and happier lives, but regrettably, far too many cats do not receive preventative health-care services.

Pet insurance can also cover the cost of spaying or neutering your cat, as well as any mishaps or diseases that may occur while she is out playing.

Make use of ourVet Finder to locate a veterinarian in your region.

Getting Your Home Ready for a Cat

Finding a veterinarian is essential, and it’s best to do it before bringing your cat home. When something happens to your animal buddy unexpectedly, you’ll know who to call for assistance. Even cats who live only inside are susceptible to injury. Aside from that, your cat will require regular checkups, yearly dental cleanings, vaccinations, and other basic preventative care. These therapies can help cats live longer, healthier, and happier lives, but regrettably, far too many cats do not receive preventative health care and wellness treatments.

Besides spaying and neutering, pet insurance can cover any mishaps or diseases that may occur while your cat is on the premises.

Find a veterinarian in your neighborhood by using ourVet Finder tool.

Lock up your cabinets

Cats are resourceful, and they have been known to unlock cabinet doors by sliding their claws underneath the door. You might want to consider installing childproof locks to help prevent your cat from getting into cleaning supplies and other potentially hazardous chemicals.

Store human medications out of paws reach

It is best not to leave prescription or over-the-counter pills in accessible areas where your cat may get to them, such as a low counter or nightstand. The drugs Tylenol and aspirin, for example, are extremely irritating to cats’ delicate stomachs.

Stow away breakable items

What about delicate gems on your mantel, table, or bookshelves? Do you have anything like that? It is preferable to store them in a location where your cat will not be able to knock them over and shatter them.

Secure window screens

Does your mantle, table, or bookshelves have any delicate artifacts on display?

If possible, store them somewhere where your cat will not be able to knock them over and cause damage.

Tie up cords

Cats can become tangled and even strangled in the cables that dangle down from blinds and other window treatments. Carefully tie them up and move them out of the way if possible.

Close the lid

Keep toilet lids down to prevent inquisitive cats from climbing up and falling into the bowl. It’s possible that little cats or kittens will be unable to go back out. It might also be beneficial to get down to your cat’s eye level and inspect the area for anything that could pose a problem, such as cords or wires that could be tripped over or chewed up by your cat.

Cat Introductions

Once your cat has settled into its new home, you may need to make a few introductions to the other pets (cats, dogs, and children) and children (children). The success or failure of these introductions will be determined in part by the personality and temperament of your new cat. Some cats may feel entirely at ease immediately away, acting as if they are the only ones in the house the moment they walk through the front door. Others will feel apprehensive and may withdraw within themselves for a period of time.

Allow them plenty of time to become adjusted before allowing them to begin exploring at their own leisure.

Cat Plus Cat

In the event that you already have another cat in the house, it is better to introduce them gradually and in stages. When you initially bring the new cat home, segregate the newcomer from the existing cat to allow the newcomer to get a feel for the place without being distracted. You should continue to separate the cats for a period of time so that they may become accustomed to the noises and scents of one another before bringing them together in the same room. Eventually, you may start allowing the two cats to spend more time together in the same room, but only with close monitoring at all times.

If they appear to be getting along, you may gradually increase the length of time they are allowed to socialize.

Cat Plus Dog

In the case of a second cat in the house, it’s better to introduce them gradually and in small groups. You should isolate the new cat from the existing cat when you initially bring him home to allow him to get a feel for the place without being bothered by his older sibling. The cats should remain apart for a period of time so that they may become accustomed to the noises and scents of one another before meeting up in the same room at some point. Eventually, you may start allowing the two cats to spend more time together in the same room, but only under under observation at all times.

If they appear to be getting along, you may gradually increase the length of time they are allowed to engage with eachother.

Cat Plus Kids

The age of the children will influence the manner in which they are introduced to the cats in question. If your children are at an age where they can comprehend what is happening and follow instructions, you can explain that the cat needs time to adjust to new people and environments. You should instruct your children to approach the cat gently instead of scooping their new fuzzy companion into their arms immediately away. In the event that your children are too young to obey directions, lead by example.

See also:  How To Take A Cat On A Road Trip

If the cat appears to be in discomfort, ask the person to step back and give the cat more time to become comfortable.

Senior cats, who may want more quiet time, may not be a suitable match for a household with a lot of energetic children.

Behavior Issues

While many cats are able to acclimate to their new surroundings without difficulty, some may have a more difficult time adjusting to their new surroundings. They may develop behavioural problems such as excessive meowing or going outside the litter box. They may also begin clawing at the furniture, despite the fact that a perfectly nice scratching post is there in front of them. Stress-related problems such as these might arise, but they can also be the outcome of a more serious underlying health problem.

  • It’s a good idea to take your cat to the veterinarian to find out what’s wrong with him.
  • Cats with behavioral problems can be a source of great frustration for their owners and may even be returned to a shelter as a result.
  • If your cat is exhibiting undesirable behavior, you should seek expert assistance.
  • Cats are excellent pets who can bring a lot of joy and affection into your life.

Helping Your Cat Adjust to a New Home

A cat’s first few days in a new home can be nervous and fearful, especially if it is unfamiliar territory. A lot may be accomplished by showing tolerance and compassion to your new feline companion during his early transition phase. The journey back to the house For cats, traveling in a car can be a frightening experience. Your cat or kitten should be restrained in a carrier for the duration of the trip home as well as any following visits to the vet. Allowing your new cat to run free in a moving car or allowing youngsters to thrill him is not recommended.

  • Keep your cat contained in his carrier until you have reached the safety of your house.
  • It’s possible that your kitten has lately been removed from his mother and litter mates.
  • It’s possible that the adult cat was isolated from its normal environment and forced to sever a link with human partners or other animals as a result.
  • Allow your cat several weeks to become used to the new environment.
  • He has to become acclimated to the fact that you are the source of affection, shelter, and food.
  • A startled cat may easily get out of a high open window if the window is not secured.
  • It is fairly unusual for cats to exhibit behavioral issues during their first few days in a new home, but these difficulties normally subside within a few days.
  • Some people may spend hours or even days hiding from the world.

Sit calmly and converse with the cat. If you have to remove the cat from his hiding place, do it gently and transfer him to a calm, sheltered area where he will feel safe and comfortable. Make sure there is food, drink, and a litter box handy.

What can you do to train your cat to behave better around the home?

This is what Jackson Galaxy, a cat behaviorist with more than 20 years of experience and the star of Animal Planet’s smash showMy Cat From Hell, has to say in his hilarious video: “I’m a cat behaviorist, and I’m a cat behaviorist. Choosing the Best and Worst Methods of Training Your Cat

The first day

Introduce your cat to his new home gradually, allowing him to explore only one area at a time at first. During this period, keep all other animals away from your new cat. Children should be supervised and instructed to always be nice with the cat. When you take the cat out of the carrier, be sure to have the litter box ready. Demonstrate to him where the litter box is located. During the first hour, offer a bowl of water but do not provide any food. Your cat may be perplexed, afraid, or intrigued about something.

Don’t forget to keep doors and windows locked, and make sure the cat is wearing an identification tag at all times!

Do not panic, scream, or rush to the cat’s location.

As your new cat grows used to your house, make an effort to spend several hours with him each day.

Sleeping arrangements

Most cats have a few preferred resting areas where they can be comfy, warm, and out of the way of drafts throughout the night. Providing your cat with a bed may help to stop him from sleeping on your furniture. A warm box or basket packed with soft, washable bedding and put in a quiet spot may do as a cat bed for your feline companion. Some cats take pleasure in selecting new (and sometimes surprising) napping locations on a regular basis. Using a washable cover over favorite locations on your furniture will help you to keep your cat safe and comfortable.

Allowing youngsters to disturb your cat when he is sleeping is not recommended.

Introduction to other animals

Their different personalities have an impact on their capacity to get along with one another in the same family. There will always be one who has the upper hand. A new cat will frequently upend the established pecking order, and an older cat or dog may feel it essential to assert dominance right once to protect its territory. Managing the “getting acquainted” stage well is critical to ensuring a smooth introduction of a new cat into the household. It is possible that the first week or two may be chaotic, irritating, and demanding.

It will take some time for you to acclimate.

New cat to resident dog

The capacity of animals to get along with one another in the same household is determined by their respective personalities. In any group, there will always be a dominant individual. A new cat will frequently upend the previous pecking order, and an older cat or dog may feel it essential to assert dominance right once to protect its territory.

When it comes to successfully introducing a new cat, how you handle the “getting acquainted” stage is really essential. A stressful, difficult, and time-consuming first week or two is to be expected. Wait for a while. It will take time for you to acclimate.

New cat to resident cat

Cats who have been spayed or neutered are often more welcoming of other cats. Adult cats are more welcoming of kittens than they are of other adults, in general. When two changed adult cats live together, they frequently become buddies. More information on introducing your new cat to your existing cat may be found here.

New cat to other resident animals

Birds, rodents, and fish should all be given enough protection from the new cat’s potential for harassing them. These animals are the natural prey of cats, and they may be stressed just by the presence of a cat in their environment. Cats and rabbits often get along well with one another, with the rabbit taking on a dominant position in the relationship. Maintain constant observation of early contacts in case your cat displays a predatory response, and never leave them unattended together until their connection is obviously pleasant and mutually beneficial.

How to Introduce a Cat to a New Environment

Safety Recommendations Check to see that the room, as well as the rest of the house, is “cat-proof” before entering. You may already have cats who do not chew on items like electrical lines, but your new cat may find them interesting and become gravely wounded or worse as a result of his/her play. Also look for threads, ribbons, and other tiny things that might be ingested and result in an emergency surgery or even death if they are swallowed. Make certain that all openings in walls, A/C vents, and ducts are securely fastened.

  1. Make sure your new cat is microchipped before introducing them to the concept of wearing a collar.
  2. Make sure you’re prepared!
  3. Getting Accustomed to the Safe Room When you first bring your new cat home, place him or her in a safe area with the door tightly closed.
  4. If there are other animals in the house, it is absolutely critical that you do not place the cat carrier on the floor and enable the other animals to approach it.
  5. Initially, they may be bashful or terrified, and they may seek refuge in a safe location where they may gather themselves and feel secure before exploring further.
  6. They will eventually begin investigating their new surroundings, which will most likely take place at night when it is dark.
  7. The vision of a cat is at its sharpest in low, dark light.

Moving to a new home is one of the most stressful experiences your cat will experience, and it is one of the most stressful occurrences that your cat will confront.

If you see any indications of disease, contact your veterinarian as soon as possible.

When they are ready, you will be able to tell because they will be excited to see you when you go into the room and intrigued about what is on the other side of the door.

They will just feel more overwhelmed as a result of this.

DO NOT hurriedly or forcefully do tasks, as humans are inclined to do.

Even when we believe we are doing things slowly, a cat will always find a way to slow us down! The following article was written by Ingrid Johnson, CCBC Certified Cat Behavior Consultant of Fundamentally Feline. The photographs are the property of Ingrid Johnson.

Tips for New Cat Owners

Recommendations for Safety In order to keep cats out of the room, you need make sure the rest of the home is as well. You may already have cats who do not chew on items like electrical lines, but your new cat may find them interesting and become gravely wounded or worse as a result of his/her curiosity. Make sure there aren’t any threads, ribbons, or tiny things that might be eaten and result in an emergency operation or even death. Inspect the walls and ceilings for any holes or A/C vents that may be present.

  1. Prepare your new cat by having him or her microchipped and starting to get him or her used to being in a collar right away.
  2. Plan ahead of time!
  3. Getting Accustomed to Being in the Safety Room Immediately after bringing your new cat home, place him or her in a safe area with the door tightly shut.
  4. The cat carrier must not be placed on the floor or allowed to be approached by the other animals if there are any already present in the house.
  5. It is possible that they will be hesitant or afraid at first, and that they will seek refuge in a safe location before investigating further.
  6. They will eventually begin investigating their new surroundings, which will most likely take place at night when it is pitch black out there.
  7. The vision of a cat is at its optimum when it is in low, dim lighting conditions.
  8. Moving to a new home is one of the most stressful experiences your cat will experience, and it is one of the most stressful ones he or she will experience.
  9. As soon as you see indications of disease, contact your veterinarian right once!
  10. When they are ready, you will be able to tell because they will be excited to see you when you go into the room and intrigued about what is on the other side of the closed door.
  11. Only additional stress will be felt by them.

NOTHING should be rushed or forced, as people are prone to doing. It never seems to be slow enough for a cat, no matter how slow we believe we are going. By Ingrid Johnson, CCBC Certified Cat Behavior Consultant and founder of Fundamentally Feline. Ingrid Johnson owns the photographs.

Before You Bring Your Cat Home:

  • The territory of a cat is extremely important to it. They regard their territory in the same way that the majority of us regard our clothes: without them, we feel exposed and defenseless. If you put us naked in a room full of strangers, the vast majority of us would attempt to conceal ourselves! It is normal for cats, whether they are from households or the streets, to seek refuge in a new area when they first arrive. Cats who are too sensitive or undersocialized will frequently hide for a week or longer! Provide them with a modest space to call their own for the first few days or weeks if you want to do them a favor. It is best to use a restroom or laundry room. In their room, fill a litter box with one or two inches of litter and leave it there so that they may use it without being disturbed. After all, everyone deserves a certain amount of privacy when it comes to going to the bathroom, and providing them with that will help them overcome their aversion to the toilet. Are you unsure which litter to select? Check out How to Choose a Cat Litter for more information. Create a feeding station with food and water dishes for the animals. Keep it out of the path of the litter box. More information about cat food and nutrition may be found in ourPet Nutritionsection. Cats enjoy hiding in little spaces to get away from it all, and you can give one for your new cat to use as their own personal safe haven when you first bring them home. A cat carrier, for example, may be an appropriate mode of transportation. You may also create one by cutting a hole in the end of a box to serve as an entrance for them. You may also get a covered cat bed from a pet supply store if that is more convenient. In any instance, make sure there is enough space for the cat to stand up and turn around without being squashed. When it comes to cats, a good “feng shui” arrangement presumably includes their being seen from their hidey-hole so that they don’t get startled
  • A cat’s claws need to be worn down, which they do by scratching objects
  • And a cat’s claws need to be worn down so that they don’t get snatched. Provide your cat with a scratching post that is suitable in social situations, because you would prefer that it not be your chairs and sofa. Some are made of corrugated cardboard and are placed on the floor
  • Others are posts that must be tall enough for the cat to reach his claws upward to scratch the surface of the post. You may encourage your cat to utilize the post (once they have arrived) by spraying it with catnip or hanging a toy from the top of it. They’ll grasp the gist of it. You’ll probably want a scratching post in each area where there is soft furniture, maybe in a position that prevents the cat from getting to the furnishings. Sticky tape (available at pet supply stores) can also be applied to the corners of upholstered furniture to discourage scratching and gnawing by your pet. Don’t miss out on these helpful hints on how to reduce kitty’s scratching, how to pick a scratching post, and more. stand information about declawing cats
  • Examine your home through the eyes of an inquisitive cat to see whether it has any possibilities for climbing and exploring. It’s possible that your cat will be astonished to find itself on top of the upper kitchen cabinets when it first arrives, so make sure there’s nothing on show there or on other high shelves that can be damaged or pushed off
  • Look for any openings or registers that allow ducting to be accessed and seal them off with caulk. One of these is immediately accessible to a kitty slithering in. Having firefighters in your home, jackhammering the concrete floor to retrieve your cat is not something you want to happen. If at all feasible, get a cat tree for your new family member. Cats like surveying their area, which is why a high perch is generally a preferred resting location for them. If you have additional human family members, go through the ground rules with them about your new pet. As a reminder, they should avoid startling them and should keep the door to their room closed. Prepare yourself for the process of introducing your cat to other animals. Remember to keep their door locked and to avoid allowing your other pet to get in suddenly. In addition, see New Cat Introductions and Living with Cats and Dogs for further information.
See also:  How To Tell If A Cat Is Blind

First Day:

You are now completely prepared for your cat’s return. Bring them home in a cat carrier if at all possible. They will feel more secure as a result of this. Due of the high level of excitement they have witnessed, you should take them immediately to their new room. Ensure that the toilet lid is fully closed if they are to become acclimated in your bathroom. Close the bathroom door before removing the carrier from the closet. Do not attempt to remove the cat. Provide the opportunity for him or her to come out on their own and begin exploring their new home.

Yes, please leave…

Prepare a tiny bit of high-quality cat food while you’re at it.

Ideally, you’d want to limit their exposure to the entire family, but it’s inevitable that everyone will want to see them at some point.

  • Allow the cat to approach you as you sit on the floor. Don’t put any pressure on them. Allow them to get to know one another at their own pace. Keep trying if the cat doesn’t approach
  • Otherwise, leave them alone and try again another time. Some cats are very fearful, and they may retire to their hiding place and refuse to come out while you’re around at any point during the day. They are only permitted to leave the house at night when it is peaceful. Give them some time
  • Your newly acquired cat may not eat much at first, if at all, depending on the breed. It is typical for re-homed cats to exhibit no interest in eating for many days after they have been adopted. If the cat is actively seeking love, eating, and not hiding, you can open the door and allow them to have another room to themselves. Continue in a gradual manner until the cat has been introduced to all of the rooms in their new home. Make certain that their water is changed on a regular basis and that they are drinking
  • And

Following Weeks:

It may take a week or two for your cat to become used to the new environment. Please be patient.

  • Take your freshly acquired cat to the veterinarian for its initial wellness check-up within a week of its adoption. Keep a record of your vaccines from the shelter with you at all times. Don’t have access to a veterinarian? Check out these suggestions for locating the best veterinarian for you and your cat
  • As your cat becomes acclimated, he or she will begin to exhibit symptoms of wanting to go outside of their secure habitat. Take precautions to ensure that other pets or family members do not frighten them as they slowly extend their area. They may be ready to play, in which case you should prepare some toys for them. Many cats enjoy feather wands purchased from a pet supply store, but handcrafted toys are frequently preferred. It might be entertaining to throw a wad of tissue paper about or hide in a paper bag. More information on how to keep your cat amused may be found at Keeping Your Cat from Getting Bored.

Congratulations! By following these guidelines for new cat owners, you will be well on your way to having a feline family member who is well-adjusted to your home.

Settling your cat into a new home

You will naturally want to show your cat that they are secure and welcome in the new home, but you will also need to be patient with them during this transition period. Your cat will adjust to their new home on their own terms and in their own time, and they will be grateful to you for allowing them to do so. Take a peek at our video for tips on acclimatizing your cat to a new environment.

How to prepare your house for a cat

Your cat should have a home base in one of the rooms of your new home. In an ideal world, this room would be a spare bedroom or another room that isn’t very occupied, and it would not have access to a cat flap. A quiet area where you can visit and sit with your new cat from time to time will be preferable if your new cat is a little hesitant at first, as they will need time to adjust to their new surroundings. Some confident and sociable cats may feel at ease in the living room if they prefer being in close proximity to people; but, in a new situation, they will want time and space to ensure that their surroundings are secure, as well as to figure out where everything they require is located.

Give your cat places to hide

Providing a variety of hiding places is essential in assisting a cat in adjusting to a new environment. These hiding spots can be anywhere, including under a bed, within a closet, or even inside cardboard boxes that can be placed in various areas about the room. Make them comfortable, warm, and private by providing them with cat beds, igloos, and blankets as needed. When a cat enters one of its hiding spots, it’s best to leave them alone to do their business. Almost certainly, they’ve gone there in order to feel more comfortable and safe.

Set up your cat’s room with everything they need

Different hiding places are essential in helping a cat adjust to a new situation and become more comfortable. It is possible to hide these items under a bed, behind a closet, or even inside cardboard boxes that may be placed in various spots throughout the room.

Make them comfortable, snug, and secluded by providing them with cat beds, igloos, and blankets as necessary. As soon as a cat enters one of its hiding spots, it is preferable to leave them alone. Almost certainly, they’ve traveled to this location to feel more protected and safe.

Make the room comfy and safe

Checking your cat’s room (and the rest of the home if they have access to the rest of the house) to make sure it is secure and free of hazards is essential before allowing them to roam free. Cleaning materials, disinfectants, prescriptions, and any DIY or decorating supplies are examples of items that should be kept locked away. You should also examine to see if there are any plants or flowers in your home that might be harmful to your cat. Your cat will also require a safe, pleasant, and warm sleeping environment.

Some cats like beds and resting sites that are elevated and high up so that they can keep an eye on what’s going on while still feeling safe and protected.

Consider using a pheromone diffuser

A relaxing pheromone diffuser, such as aFeliway® Classic Diffuser, may also be beneficial to your cat’s wellbeing. These devices connect to an electrical outlet and release a synthetic version of the pheromone that cats naturally make from smell glands in their cheeks when they are awake. Incorporating one of these into your cat’s settling area at least 24 hours before to their arrival (and preferably as soon as feasible afterwards) can assist to lessen their tension while also making your cat feel safer and more comfortable.

Make sure the whole house is escape-proof

During the first few days, your cat will be unfamiliar with your surroundings and may get fearful. Your cat’s natural tendency will be to flee, so even if there is just a little crack in a window or door, they may make a break for it and escape to the outside. Unless you are convinced that your cat is safe in their room and will not be able to escape, you must keep all windows and front and rear doors locked. Cat flaps and chimneys should be closed and secured in case your cat attempts to escape from their room when they first enter there.

Transporting your cat to a new home

Ensure that you have a suitable container for your cat when you transport it home. This will keep them safe during the travel. The ideal carrier is robust, reasonably lightweight, secure, and simple to clean. It should also be durable. Ideally, carriers that can be opened from both sides, including the top, are preferred, since this gives you the option of lowering your cat in through the top opening.

Remember to put a nice blanket in the bottom of the carrier for comfort, as well as a plastic liner below and a towel or blanket covering it to make your cat feel less exposed throughout the travel. A more in-depth discussion of cat carriers is available in our guide on traveling with cats.

The first day your cat is home

You should put the carrier in your cat’s room, ideally adjacent to one of his hiding spots, and then close the door behind you upon returning home. Allow them to come out and explore at their own pace once you have gently opened the carrier. If they don’t come out on their own, resist the temptation to tilt them out of the carrier or pull them out with your hands. Depending on how much time has passed, your cat may come out immediately, inspect the room, seek shelter, or even approach you. Allow children to make decisions about where they go and what they do as they get to know their new surroundings, whatever they decide.

  • It’s OK to spend some peaceful time with them in their settling room (for example, sitting and simply reading a book or magazine), but if they remain concealed, they may prefer to be left alone for a period of time as well.
  • Maintaining patience throughout the early stages of the adoption process is essential since some cats will require several weeks to feel secure in their new home.
  • Be certain that your cat’s lack of appetite on the first day is normal, especially if your cat appears to be a bit fearful of the new environment.
  • Alternatively, they may learn that crying at night will result in food or some other reward, and this may soon become a habit.
  • You should avoid introducing your cat to any other animals in the house for the first few days after bringing her home.

Settling your cat in their new home

If your cat appears comfortable, confident, and eager to explore after a few days, you can allow them to be released from their enclosure (providing you are not preparing tointroduce your cat to childrenor other pets in the home). During the first few days, your cat will need time to settle in and become comfortable before meeting too many other people, so try to keep the number of guests you have over to a minimum. Your cat may find it simpler if you introduce them to your house one room at a time, returning to their’safe room’ at night after they have been acclimated.

See also:  How To Spay A Cat At Home

Let your cat fully settle before letting them outside

Even though you may be tempted to bring your cat out into the yard sooner rather than later, it is typically a good idea to wait at least two to three weeks and up to four to six weeks before exposing them to even more new terrain outdoors. Please call Battersea if your cat seems restless and is regularly waiting at the back door or pacing, clawing, or pawing at the door area.

They can provide you with further information regarding the optimum time to begin to allow your cat outside. More information on preparing your cat for the move from the indoors to the outside can be found at How to introduce your cat to the outside.

Interact with your cat on their own terms

Make an effort to allow them control over when and how they connect with you while engaging with your cat, or any cat, for that matter. For example, always let them to initiate any contact with you by allowing them to make the first move. Cats prefer to feel in command, which means that connecting with them in a kind and on their terms is the ideal method of communication. While doing so will not prevent you from providing attention to a cat that requests it, it will assist you in ensuring that you are not overwhelming your cat or causing them to feel worried or afraid in any way.

How to Move With a Cat

Allow your cat, or any cat, to have a say in when and how they engage with you by giving them a choice in the interactions. For example, always enable them to initiate any contact with you by allowing them to make the initial move. Considering that cats want to feel in command, it is preferable to engage with them in a calm and respectful manner that meets their needs. While doing so will not prevent you from providing attention to a cat that requests it, it will assist you in ensuring that you are not overwhelming your cat or causing them to feel anxious or scared by your presence.

Before the Move

It is likely that your cat may detect changes as you prepare to relocate and may get agitated before you have even finished packing up. This may drive the cat to flee, hide, or run away. Even if your cat regularly has access to the outdoors, make sure he or she is confined indoors for a week or two before you move to avoid any problems. Consider bringing your cat indoors on a permanent basis for his or her own protection. Try to maintain as much of your usual routine as you can at this time. Feed your cat at the regular feeding times.

  • If your cat enjoys boxes in the same manner that most cats do, you may make the packing process more enjoyable by putting empty boxes about for your cat to play in while you are in the process of packing.
  • Keep it open in an area where your cat is likely to congregate.
  • If your cat has formed a pleasant relationship with the carrier, he may be less anxious throughout the journey.
  • This might make your cat feel more secure and at ease as the relocation day approaches.

During the Move

While boxes and furnishings are being moved, confine your cat to a certain room of the house. A litter box, a cat bed, food and drink containers, toys, and a scratching pad should all be present in the room. Remove any things that need to be relocated before your cat enters the room. When you are ready to move into your new house, you may gather all of your cat’s belongings in one place to make setting up your new home a breeze. For the duration of the trip, your cat will need to be confined, most likely in a cat carrier.

For the sake of everyone’s safety, a cat should not be allowed to roam freely in the automobile.

In order to assist your cat rest throughout the trip, especially if you have a lengthy drive ahead of you or have a cat who gets really anxious in the car, a soothing aid may be good.

Inquire with your veterinarian about soothing medications for cats. Over-the-counter options include a wide variety of natural soothing remedies. If your cat is very nervous or if you’re taking a long-distance journey, your veterinarian may offer a prescription sedative.

After the Move

In your new house, create a “safe area” for your cat, which should have a litter box, a scratching pad, toys, and water dishes. Place one or two empty boxes in the room to be used for hiding or for playing games. Scents that are familiar to your cat might assist to soothe him. Maintain your personal aroma in the space by bringing some of your own clothing into it. Bring a blanket or towel that has the odors of your childhood home with you. It is important to ensure that the room is safe and does not have access to a crawl space or other places where your cat may escape or become trapped.

  • Depending on the cat, this might take anything from a few days to many weeks.
  • Leave the carrier open for your cat to emerge naturally; do not force him out of the container.
  • Others would choose to remain in the carrier or hide in another part of the room, while others will be eager to investigate the surroundings.
  • Set up a pheromone diffuser in the room or spray the mattress with pheromones to help you sleep better.
  • While you’re moving in, unpacking, and organizing your new house, keep your cat in the secure room.
  • Attempt to maintain as much consistency as possible with the typical eating schedule.
  • Feeding him warm, wet cat food and treats will encourage him to consume more calories.

Adjusting to the New Home

Once your cat has finished eating and appears to be in a good mood, you may allow him to begin exploring other parts of the house. Your cat may even appear to be interested in what is happening on the other side of the door. Allow your cat to become familiar with his new surroundings gradually. To make it easier on yourself, introduce one new room at a time and block off areas where you don’t want your cat to go to hide. A terrified cat may flee and seek refuge in a dark place such as a basement or attic.

  • It takes a varying amount of time for each cat to acclimate.
  • There are some cats that will insist on going out of their secure space while others who would choose to remain.
  • Even the most courageous of cats will feel stress when they are relocated to a new home.
  • Consult your veterinarian for guidance on feline behavior, or seek the services of a feline behaviorist.
  • Make sure your cat’s identification tag is up to date, and that any microchip registrations have your current contact information.
  • Once your cat appears to have been acclimated to the interior of your new house, you can introduce your cat to your yard.

To begin, take your child outside for around ten minutes of supervised exploration and play. Increase the amount of time your cat spends outside gradually until he or she appears comfortable in the environment.

How can I help my cat adjust to a new home? – RSPCA Knowledgebase

As soon as your cat has finished eating and appears to be in a good mood, you may allow him to begin exploring other parts of the house. You may even notice that your cat is interested in what is happening on the other side of the closed door. Allow your cat to explore his new environment at his own pace and at his own pace. To make it easier on yourself, introduce one new room at a time and block off areas where you don’t want your cat to go to hide. Often, a scared cat would flee and seek refuge in a dark place such as a basement or an attic.

  1. It takes a varied amount of time for every cat to acclimate.
  2. There are some cats that will insist on going out of their secure space while others who would choose to remain.
  3. Stress may be experienced by even the toughest of cats when they are relocated.
  4. Obtain behavior guidance from your veterinarian or consult with a cat behaviorist.
  5. Purchase a new identification tag for your cat, and make sure your contact information is included in any microchip registrations.
  6. It is possible to introduce your cat to your yard once he or she has gotten used to the inside of the new home.
  7. Increase the amount of time your cat spends outside gradually until he appears comfortable in the environment.

How to Acclimate a Cat to a New Home – PetPlace

What is the best way to introduce a cat to a new environment? This may be a very tough transition for a cat, especially if it is a stray that is accustomed to live outside. You will need patience and understanding during the early transition phase in order to assist your new cat in becoming more comfortable in its new surroundings. Begin by considering your cat’s prior encounters with people and animals. Bringing a kitten home might mean that it has just been separated from its mother and other kittens in the litter.

  1. An adult cat may have been separated from their familiar home and may have been forced to break their link with their human partners or other household pets as a result of this separation.
  2. So, what are some of the best strategies for getting a cat into your house?
  3. It is very unusual for cats to exhibit behavioral difficulties during this period of transition, but these issues should subside with time.
  4. Also, make sure their food and litter box are easily accessible.
  5. Try not to overburden the cat with attention by providing a bowl of water but refrain from feeding them shortly after.
  6. Allow them to take their time.
  7. If possible, keep other animals away from your new cat during this period, and keep an eye on your children when they engage with the cat.
  8. You may also consider putting a comfortable cat bed in a quiet part of the room.
  9. Please keep in mind that the cat is being brought to a territory that has already been claimed by your resident pet, so you must consider the sensitivities of both animals.
  10. It will take a week or two for a good transition to take place, and things may become a bit chaotic in the meantime.

Keep your cool; things will most likely work themselves out in due course. In the opinion of Dr. Monique Chretien, this is how you can successfully introduce your new cat to other animals in the house.

Cat-to-Cat Introductions

After bringing a cat home, it is recommended that they be kept in a private room for the first week in their new environment. It is not acceptable for your resident cat to enter this room or to remain at the entrance hissing and hissing.

  • Allow your existing cat to explore beyond the door of the room where the new cat will be staying once a week has passed. After all symptoms of antagonism (hissing, snarling, etc.) have been eliminated, open the door a crack. To keep the door closed, use a doorstop or a hook. Place the new cat in a big carrier or crate if you have one available. Then you should move it into your primary living space. Make a point of offering both cats treats or delectable food at the same time to ensure that they link each other’s presence with a joyful experience. Allow the cats to engage with one another under your supervision once they have become used to the scenario. It may be necessary to reduce their exposure time to 5 or 10 minutes if there are symptoms of hostility, or you may need to revert back to the separation period. Increase the amount of time the cats spend together gradually, as long as they are not acting violently toward one another. Also, take in mind that cat play can be a little rough around the edges.

If your cats are content in their surroundings, they are more likely to get along with one another. Check to see that there are enough of hiding places for them, and make sure that the food, drink, and litter boxes are out in the open so that the cats don’t feel imprisoned.

Cat-to-Dog Introductions

When introducing a cat to a new home’s current dog, adhere to the following guidelines:

  • Never, ever allow the dog to run approach the cat, even if it’s only for fun. Maintain an abundance of escape routes and high hiding spots that are immediately available at all times for your cat. Whenever possible, your cat must be able to escape from the dog’s clutches. Continue to gradually increase the amount of time the dog and cat spend together, but always keep a close eye on them until you are completely certain that there is no risk.

Cat-to Bird or Other Small Pet Introductions

Due to the fact that cats are natural predators, you should keep your tiny furry companions secure by keeping them in an enclosure that cannot be opened by a quick paw. Whenever possible, keep them in an area that is off bounds to your feline family member while they are not being monitored, and follow the same routine with your feathery companions, but be cautious about where you decide to store them. Because of health concerns, there are certain limits on where birds can be kept in captivity (not in direct sun or near a draft).

The 12th of November, 2019

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