How To Keep Cat Away From Plants

Keeping Your Cat Out of Your Houseplants

Cats are naturally inquisitive creatures, so it’s no surprise that anything moving within your home becomes a possible prey item for them. Planting flowers and plants around your home might feel like a sacrificial event at times (for the plant). If the leaves or fronds aren’t enough to entice them, some cats may dig in your planter or, even worse, defecate in it. It is not a personal attack. It’s important to remember that your cat isn’t destroying your decor out of spite, despite how frustrating it can be to find your favorite plants looking like swiss cheese.

Here are some suggestions for diagnosing the reasons why your cat won’t leave your indoor plants alone, as well as how to divert their interest to something else.

Why Is My Cat Eating My Plants?

It is through his or her mouth that a cat begins most of its explorations. Although that may not seem very appetizing to you and me, even as neonates, we were exposed to a wide range of new experiences in the same way. We put everything in our mouths when we are newborns, and cats do the same when they are young. It’s a sure bet that your cat will come back for more if the food is delicious. Even with non-toxic plant kinds, you will want to keep an eye on how much of the plant they are gnawing away at.

Hopefully, you’ve read our post on the Top 10 Indoor Plants Knowing Are Safe for Cats, which will help set your mind at ease that the greenery in your house is safe for your feline companions.

You will want to keep an eye on how much they are chewing off since even safe plants can induce an upset stomach or even a gastrointestinal blockage if they swallow too much or ingest a huge frond.

For example, they may experience changes in their typical feeding patterns or have difficulty defecating in the litter box.

Cats Like the Texture of Plants

It is through his or her mouth that a cat begins much of its investigation. Many things that we encountered for the first time as babies may not seem very appealing to you and me now, yet we did so even as infants. Everything we eat as newborns ends up in our mouths, and cats are no different. The likelihood that your cat will return for more food is high if the food is enjoyable to him. You will want to keep an eye on how much they are chewing off even if the plants are non-toxic. If you eat too much of a leaf or frond, even seemingly harmless plants can trigger an upset stomach, nausea, and vomiting.

Non-toxic plants, on the other hand, are just as enticing to your cat as hazardous plants are.

If you suspect your cat is exhibiting any strange behavior, you should call your veterinarian right away! For example, they may experience changes in their normal feeding patterns or have difficulty defecating in the litter box.

Cats Love the Movement of Leaves

This is most likely the most important reason why cats are attracted to plants. Cats are born hunters and have a natural instinct for hunting. Despite the fact that they are carnivores, they find it virtually hard to resist the movement of a leaf or palm. The Spider Plant is one of our favorite houseplants because of its long, silky leaves, which are really fascinating to look at. It seemed like a good idea to us to designate one plant as collateral damage, and this was the plant in question!

Cats Chew Up Plants Out of Boredom

For many cats, plants are the most attractive thing in the world. Kittens are born hunters, and they hunt in their natural environment. Despite the fact that they are carnivores, they sometimes find it difficult to resist the movement of a leaf or palm. The Spider Plant is one of our favorite houseplants because of its long, velvety leaves, which are highly tempting to the eye. It seemed like a good idea to us to designate one plant as collateral damage, and this was the plant in question!

How to Keep Your Cat From Eating Your Plants

This is most likely the most important reason why cats adore plants. Cats are hunters by nature. It can be difficult for them to resist the movement of a leaf or palm, even if they are carnivores. The Spider Plant is one of our favorite houseplants because of its long, silky leaves, which are quite appealing. For us, it was a fantastic idea to devote one plant as collateral damage, and this was the plant in question!

Top Tips to Keep Your Cat Away from Plants

1. Make Your Plant Appealing to the Eye. Cats have a severe aversion to anything citrus-flavored. The leaves of your plant can be sprayed with the juice of a lemon, lime, or orange that has been diluted with water to fight off any feline invasion. If you don’t want to prepare your own concoction, Bodhi Dog produces a Bitter Lemon Spray that you may purchase. I’ve discovered that it works quite well (and that you don’t have to bother about using and cleaning up a general-purpose plastic spray bottle).

  • They will not return because of the harsh taste in their mouths.
  • There are a variety of locations where you may properly store your household plants to avoid any mistreatment from occurring.
  • Try something different and utilize an old fish tank as a planter, terrarium, or a giant dome birdcage to house your plants.
  • Safety Please keep in mind that lilies are harmful to cats, so just putting a flower on a shelf away from your cat does not guarantee it is safe.
  • 3.
  • Cat grass or an indoor cat garden are two alternative methods of diverting your cat’s interest away from your plants.
  • Despite the fact that this is a safe option, you should still keep an eye on how much they are consuming.

4.

Yes, cats can be trained in the same way that dogs can.

Some people teach their cats to do tricks, while others leash train their cats in order to allow them to spend more time outdoors.

When teaching your cat something new, Dr.

“Treats are quite simple to make.

Furthermore, these goodies include Omega 3 Fatty Acids and have meat as the first component, as well as other easily recognized substances.

Pro tip: If your cat’s malicious nature does not extend to destroying your plants on the floor, you may want to consider using adhesive putty to seal the bottom of your planter to prevent this from happening.

I know that I have it beneath the majority of our ceramics (since we have children, too)! In addition to being reusable, sticky putty is also non-toxic and doesn’t dry out like other types of putty. Alcolin Sticky Putty is a type of adhesive putty.

Why is My Cat Digging in My Planter?

Having a digger and having them make a mess around your plant is not an uncommon occurrence. It’s important to remember that digging is a natural inclination for cats. If you’ve ever seen your cat hiding their potty deposits, it’s because they’re trying to disguise the scent from predators and their prey, according to the American Cat Association. Your indoor cat does not have to worry about any of those things, but you are not going to modify thousands of years of instinct just because your outside cat does not!

Make the Soil Unappealing to Your Cat

Having a digger and having them make a mess around your plant isn’t an uncommon occurrence. Always keep in mind that digging is a cat’s natural nature. In the event that you’ve ever seen your cat burying their pee deposits, it’s because they’re trying to cover the scent from predators and prey. Your indoor cat does not have to worry about any of those things, but you are not going to change thousands of years of instinct just because your outside cat does not. If they are simply digging (as opposed to using it as a litter box, which you can read more about below), there are certain things you may do to discourage this undesirable habit.

Cover Your Soil From Your Cat

If you don’t want to go the citrus way, you may cover the soil with aluminum foil instead of plastic wrap. Due to the fact that cats do not enjoy the sound and feel of aluminum foil on their paws, this can be an effective deterrent. During the holidays, foil may also be used to keep your cat away from your Christmas tree if you are having difficulty keeping him away. Aluminum foil, on the other hand, does not appeal to me, therefore I like to use little ornamental pebbles instead. If you see that they are tossing the little pebbles about, try using a slightly larger stone with more weight to counteract this.

Why is My Cat Using a Planter as a Litter Box?

It is not necessary to investigate why your cat is utilizing a planter as a litter box in order to figure out what is going on. There are normally two causes for this – one of which is most likely related to the litter box that you purchased for your cat.

It’s Natural for Cats to DigDo Their Doody

According to the information provided before, cats are naturally inclined to dig, particularly in cold, soft earth. In order to prevent this from happening, keep an eye out for unexpected surprises in your outside planters, either from your cats (if they are outdoor cats) or from wild cats in the vicinity. They require a resting spot, and what better place to do it than in your beautiful flower garden? You may make your planters unattractive by employing the same approaches as those outlined above.

Set Your Cat Up for Litter Box Success

If you want to learn more about how to put your cat up for success with the litter box, check out our wonderful article series, Litter Box 101. When attempting to figure out why your cat is pooping in unexpected places, there are a handful of factors to keep in mind. Once again, it’s critical to check that your cat does not have any underlying medical conditions that may cause him to make a mess in the house.

If you notice any changes in your cat’s litter box habits, you should consult with your veterinarian immediately. After you’ve ruled out any medical difficulties, it’s likely that your cat is dissatisfied with the state of their litter box setting.

  • Cats like a well-kept litter box. Although it should go without saying, how many times have we all neglected to clean up the litter box in the first place? Or perhaps we requested our children to do the daily scoop but they failed to remember? It occurs, however if you aren’t cleaning your cat’s litter box on a regular basis, it’s possible that they are opting to eliminate somewhere else. Every day should be spent cleaning the litter boxes. In addition, you may have noticed that I used the word boxes in the plural within your home
  • You will need one more box than the number of cats in your home. The number of litter boxes in your home should be one greater than the number of cats you have in your home. As a result, one cat equates to two litter boxes. Two cats are equal to three boxes, and so on and so forth. It is also recommended that you place a litter box on each floor if your home has numerous levels. Nobody I know like having only one bathroom in their house, so image having to share a little box with someone else! No, thank you very much.

Petmate Litter Pan (Petmate Litter Pan) High Sided Corner Litter Box by Nature’s Miracle Advanced High Sided Corner Litter Box by Nature’s Miracle These two litter boxes are identical to the style and make of the litter boxes that we use at home. The Petmate litter pan is approximately 30 inches in length and 20 inches in depth, providing the cats with plenty of space to wander about. Also included are two side pockets, which may be used to store your scoop as well as your throwaway bags. One of the finest investments I’ve ever made, in my humble opinion.

Because of its “out of the way” location, it provides an enormous amount of room for moving around.

  • When it comes to purchasing a litter box, size does matter. As a result of their agility, cats are prone to making this error, which many cat enthusiasts make. Cats, on the other hand, require space to relieve themselves. Cats may be very picky about the size, shape, depth, and other elements of their litter box. Cats can be quite particular about the size, shape, depth, and other characteristics of their litter box. You should make sure that your cat’s litter box is large enough to allow him or her to wander around freely. The right size litter box should be at least as long as your cat, from the tip of their nose to the tip of their tail, as a general guideline (when extended). When your cat’s tail isn’t stretched, its breadth should be at least as wide as the length of your cat.

Hopefully, this has provided you with some alternatives when attempting to maintain a bright environment while also keeping your cat healthy! Examine your situation and your cat’s personality to determine what works best for you. Although your non-toxic plants should not be poisonous to your cat, it is still vital to pay special attention to any aberrant behavior your cat may exhibit after being near them. In spite of the fact that your plants are not hazardous to cats from a toxicology viewpoint, your kitty may ingest enough of a leaf to produce nausea and vomiting.

Unusual Cat Behavior to Look Out For:

  • Cushing’s syndrome (coughing, gagging, sneezing, vomiting), decreased appetite, pawing at the mouth or nose

Immediately call your veterinarian if you detect any of these symptoms or anything else that appears to be alarming. The Animal Poison Control Center Hotline of the American Society of Poison Control is a fantastic source of more information on plant and flower toxicity. Please share your best suggestions and tactics for keeping your cat away from your plants in the comments section below!

7 Effective Ways to Keep Cats out of Indoor Plants

It should be noted that some of the links on this page may be affiliate links. Depending on how you use an affiliate link and how much money you spend, I may receive a commission. As an Amazon Associate, I receive a commission on eligible purchases. If you have one (or more) cats in the home who are determined to cause problems, having a green thumb can only go you so far when it comes to houseplants. There are a variety of issues that might arise when cats and plants come into contact. The first is that some cats enjoy chewing on leaves, which might result in damaged plants or ill kittens as a result.

See also:  How To Get Cat Urine Out Of Couch

It is also possible that cats may dig in the potted earth and use it as a litter box, which can be a very unpleasant situation.

So, what can you do to prevent your cats away from your houseplants and other indoor plants? Rather than choosing between your plants and your pets, try using a couple of these strategies to make everyone more comfortable with one another.

1 – Use a Spray Bottle

In this case, we’re talking about the standard cat “training” approach. Keep a spray bottle of water on hand, and spritz your cat when they go too close to your flowers or vegetables. Spray bottles at a reasonable cost can be found online (see link to Amazon) or at your local hardware shop. Despite its simplicity, this strategy only works if you are at home the most of the time and can keep a check on your plants personally. Some cats will just become more sneaky and mischievous while you are not home, but others will acquire an aversion to plants as a result of this and will avoid them even when you are around.

2 – Try a Repellent Spray

We’re now talking about sprays that you may put on your plants to keep your cats away. It is possible to purchase a variety of highly scented goods on the market that will cause your cat to turn up its nose if it comes too close, or you may manufacture your own using common home components. Mixing water with strongly fragrant soap (such as lavender or citrus) can be effective, as can dissolving garlic paste in water for a similar but more pungent result. Even more extreme measures can be used to achieve a similar effect by sprinkling hot chili pepper around the base of your plants.

Use with extreme caution.

Although vinegar is harmless for you and your pets, it is still an acid, and it will almost certainly damage the leaves of your plants after a few sprays of the solution.

3 – Add a Layer of Stone Mulch

This is for the people that dig. Cats want loose dirt in which to dig for their toilet requirements, and your houseplants will provide enough of this for them. Consider putting a layer of heavy stones on top of the dirt to make it more stable. As long as it is not packed too firmly, it should still allow water to flow through to the soil beneath it. Because it doesn’t have the same feel as a litter box, it won’t be as appealing to cats. If you like a more ornamental aesthetic, you may also use huge pieces of smooth glass, rough pine cones, seashells, or shattered pottery to create your centerpiece.

4 – Alter the Placement of Your Plants

It’s possible that you’ll have to settle with just transferring your plants to a location where your cats won’t be able to get to them, which might be difficult if you have cats who are very nimble and determined. Hanging baskets that are not in close proximity to other pieces of furniture, or even containers that attach directly to the wall (without a shelf) and are placed out of reach, can be a nice choice. Is it possible to relocate your plants to a room with a lockable door?

5 – Create Unpleasant Surroundings

Giving your cat a good fright may be a fantastic deterrent, and having something loud and surprising happen when they leap up by your plants can be enough to get them to stop the behavior. – Plants on a table or shelf where there is some additional room around the pots to deal with are the greatest candidates for this technique. If a few carelessly arranged tin-foil plates are knocked over, they may make quite a commotion, for example. Depending on the environment in which your plants are located, you may need to be more inventive.

Another approach that is similar is to create a sticky surface that your cat will not want to walk through. Double-sided tape set out between your plant pots may be a fantastic barrier, as long as you don’t leave enough room between the tape to allow for leaping around.

6 – Clean the Litter Box

Giving your cat a good shock may be a fantastic deterrent, and having something loud and surprising happen when they leap up by your plants can be enough to get them to stop the behavior.. Plants on a table or shelf where there is some additional room around the pots to deal with are the best candidates for this method of arrangement. If a few carelessly arranged tin-foil plates are knocked over, for example, they can make a noise. Depending on the environment in which you keep your plants, you may need to be inventive.

It is possible to establish a barrier using double-sided tape placed between your plant pots, as long as you do not leave enough gap between the tape to allow for jumping.

7 – Provide Plants for Your Cats

Giving your cat a good fright may be a fantastic deterrent, and having something loud and surprising happen when they leap up near your plants can be enough to break the behavior. Plants on a table or shelf where there is some additional room around the pots to deal with are the greatest candidates for this method. If a few carelessly arranged tin-foil plates are knocked over, they may make quite a racket. Depending on the environment in which your plants are located, you may need to be inventive.

Another approach that is similar is to make a sticky surface that your cat will not want to walk on.

Watch for Toxic Plants

Giving your cat a good fright may be a fantastic deterrent, and having something loud and surprising happen when they leap up near your plants can be enough to break the behavior. This works best with plants on a table or shelf where there is some additional room around the pots to work with. If a few carelessly arranged tin-foil plates are pushed over, they might generate a commotion. Depending on the environment in which your plants are located, you may have to be inventive. However, it is possible that this strategy will need to be reset each day.

Double-sided tape placed between your plant pots may be a great barrier, as long as you don’t leave enough gap between the tape to allow for leaping.

  • Alyssum
  • Begonia
  • English ivy
  • Dumbcane
  • Jade plant
  • Lilies
  • Chrysanthemum
  • Coleus
  • Pothos
  • Pointsettia
  • Tomato
  • Tomato plant

Due to the fact that they are only toxic if chewed, they are not a significant threat if your cats are digging in the dirt or knocking things over, for example. On the other hand, why would you want to take the chance?

16 Expert Tips To Keep Cats Out Of Your Plants

No matter how much I admire my cats, they have a habit of reciprocating their adoration by ruining my indoor plants. It’s possible that they’re envious of my adoration. There’s no need to pick between your kitties and your indoor plants because they’re compatible.

The following are a few suggestions for keeping your cats from using your potted plants as their own organic litter box or chewing on the greens in your plants. In this essay, we’ll take a look at a few important aspects. Continue reading, or use the following table of contents as a guide:

  • No matter how much I admire my cats, they have a habit of reciprocating their enthusiasm by ruining my plants. It’s possible that they’re envious of my attention. The choice between your kitties and your indoor plants does not have to be a difficult one. The following are some suggestions for keeping your cats from using your potted plants as their own organic litter box or chewing on the greenery in them. For the sake of this post, we’ll examine a few important topics. Please continue reading, or you may refer to the following table of contents for assistance:

If you’re looking for some pet-friendly plants, we recommend you check out this bundle option fromIcarus Plant Shop– and when you use our link, you get 10% off your purchase.Happy Caturday. This is my cat June Bug eating my plantCaturdaycatkittiesbadcatCatsOfTwitterkitty Why Is My Cat Eating My Plants?

To begin, let’s take a look at why cats like chewing on your garden plants in the first place, followed by some suggestions for how to prevent your cat from eating plants. The majority of the time, cats are consuming your plants for one of the three reasons listed below:

  • Apparently, your cat like the flavor or fragrance of the plants. The texture of the plants appeals to your cat, and so do you. Your cat is bored and on the lookout for new ways to wreck havoc in your home
  • It’s possible that your cat is punishing you because their food dish needs to be refilled or because they want a fresh litter box
  • Your cat may be depriving itself of essential nutrients if it is actively consuming the dirt in the plant pot. You might consider taking your cat to the veterinarian for a check-up.

How To Train Your Cat NOT To Do Something

Cats are famously tough to teach, but it isn’t impossible to get them to cooperate. We’ll get into particular plant recommendations later, but first, here are some general guidelines to protect your cat from doing something they shouldn’t. Image courtesy of The Spruce

Timeouts

Cats are more intelligent than we give them credit for. Despite the fact that a timeout appears to be a human idea, cats can recognize when they are being punished. The trick here is to do it promptly after the conduct and not to keep them there for an extended period of time. Cat-centric website Awesome Cats recommends that you place your cats in time out for around 10 minutes so that they may build a link between the time and the offense.

Noise

Cats are easily startled, so anything that makes a lot of noise will keep them away. According to my own experience, making a loud “psssst” sound with your mouth may deter a cat from undertaking just about any activity. One more idea you may try is to fill a small water bottle with pennies, which you can keep in your pocket. When the cat is acting inappropriately, shake the bottle.

Smell and Feel Deterrents

Cats are extremely sensitive to smells and physical contact. The next sections will go through some particular plant alternatives, but cats are typically not fond of citrus scents or items with rough or uneven surfaces – such as a pinecone – in general. In a similar vein, sticky choices (such as tape) and unexpectedly crunchy materials (such as aluminum foil) can be effective detersives.

Spray bottle

This isn’t simply applicable to cats, either. It doesn’t matter if it’s dogs, humans, or anything else. A spray of water does not harm the cat and may even cause them to reconsider their actions if they repeat the activity a second time. As an added benefit, you may add a few drops of apple cider vinegar to the water. It has a strong odor that they do not care for.

Consistency Is Key

This is not just true for cats, but also for other animals as well, including humans. Whether it’s with dogs or with people, no one is happy. Even while it is not harmful to the cat, a spray of water might cause them to pause and consider if they should repeat the activity. Adding a few drops of apple cider vinegar to the water is an added advantage. It has a strong odor that they do not like.

Houseplants Cats Won’t Chew On

The simplest method to keep your cat from devouring a potted plant salad is to pick one of these cat-proof houseplants to display in your home. The smell of some plants may be pleasant to human senses, but cats will find them repulsive and shun them altogether. Plant them in amongst your other plants to deter those pesky paws from snooping around.

  • Rosemary, Scaredy Cat Plant (Coleus Canina), Lavender, Lemon Thyme, Rue, and Prickly Plants are all good choices. Anything that has prickles or thorns will naturally dissuade your cat from interacting with it
  • Cacti, roses (which are particularly beneficial in outdoor environments), and other plants

Did you know that cats aren’t the only ones that loathe the smell of citrus fruits and vegetables? Mosquitoes feel the same way! Check out our recommendations for mosquito-repelling plants! Interested in purchasing houseplants online? We have a 10% off coupon for Icarus Plant Shop that you can use today only! Caution: Cat owners are frequently advised to use pennyroyal to dissuade cats from entering their homes.

I would, however, advise against it in this case. If your cats have a death desire (mine are utterly irresponsible), and they happen to take pennyroyal for any reason, it can result in serious health problems. Keep cats away from houseplants with these simple tips.

Toxic Plants To Keep Away From Cats

On that point, there are some plants that should be kept out of reach at all costs. For additional information on plants that are hazardous to pets, please see the ASPCA website. You could also look at plants that are suitable for cats and dogs.

How to Keep Cats Out Of Houseplants

Finally, there are several plants that should be kept out of reach at all costs. These include: To find out more about plants that are poisonous visit pets, go to the American Society of Animal Hospitals and Clinics. You should also look into plants that are suitable for cats and dogs to consume.

Natural Cat Deterrent Options

For those who don’t wish to cultivate one of the plants listed above, here are some alternative recommendations culled from various sources on the internet that cats find objectionable.

  • Coffee grounds
  • Black pepper (you can also sprinkle cayenne pepper in the issue region)
  • Tea leaves
  • Plastic carpet runner
  • Ultrasonic devices
  • Plastic forks
  • Eucalyptus oil
  • Pine Cones
  • Coffee grounds
  • Cayenne pepper (you can also sprinkle cayenne pepper in the problem area)

Smells Cats Hate

Cats have a 40x greater sensitivity to odors than either you or I. If you want to use scents to repel your cats, there are a few different possibilities that cats will not tolerate:

  • In comparison to humans, cats are 40 times more sensitive to odors. You have a few alternatives if you want to dissuade your cats with smells that they can’t abide, including the following:
See also:  How To Tell If My Cat Is Depressed

Spray To Keep Cats Away From Plants

There are also a range of sprays available that might assist you in keeping your cats away from plants and furnishings. When choosing a spray, it’s critical to choose one that is both safe for your cats and effective on your plants. Here are some suggestions. Here are a few of our personal favorites:

  • It’s also possible to purchase a range of sprays to keep your cats away from plants and furnishings. The most essential thing to look for when selecting a spray is one that is both safe for your cats and effective on the plant. These are just a few of our personal favorites:

There are also a range of sprays available to keep your cats away from plants and furnishings. When selecting a spray, it is critical to choose one that is both safe for your cats and effective on your plants. Here are a few of our favorite examples:

Toxic Plants To Keep Away From Cats

On that point, there are some plants that should be kept out of reach at all costs. For additional information on plants that are hazardous to pets, please see the ASPCA website. You could also look at plants that are suitable for cats and dogs.

What Plants Are Poisonous To Cats?

Many plants, including lilies, have the potential to be toxic to your cats, and this is especially true for the latter. An individual leaf or blossom from several different lily kinds might cause severe renal failure in your cats. Again, this is by no means a comprehensive list; if you have any questions, you should consult the ASPCA’s website for clarification. But, be extra careful they don’t get into contact with the following items:

  • Cats are known to be adversely affected by a wide variety of plants, and lilies are among the most dangerous of these. An individual leaf or blossom from several different lily kinds might cause severe renal failure in your cat. As a reminder, this is by no means an exhaustive list
  • If you have any questions, you should consult the ASPCA’s website. However, make particular note of the following items to keep kids away from:

Please keep in mind, however, that “toxic” does not always imply “death.” Many houseplants may cause your cat’s tongue to get numb or his stomach to pain, but they will not kill him. Please take the time to review the ASPCA’s list of symptoms before making a choice about your pet. For those seeking for a low-maintenance plant that is not poisonous to cats, the purple waffle is an excellent choice. It is one of our favorite plants from this year. A nice list of fan-favorite items that are not poisonous to cats can be found here: Take a look at this purrrrfectbundle from Icarus Plant Shop (and take advantage of a 10% discount on your order) if you’re seeking for a collection of plants that won’t make your feline companions sick: Plants that are toxic to cats are listed below.

Dangers Of Cats In The Vegetable Garden

There are a variety of unexpected and irritating concerns that might arise for gardeners who have an indoor/outdoor cat. Cat feces include a large number of germs and parasites that are potentially harmful. If they decide to do their business in your garden soil, this is a cause for concern since you are consuming the plants that are growing in your garden. Cats also prey on birds, which may seem like a normal part of nature – yet they prey on a large number of birds.

According to ABCbirds.org, our outdoor cats kill 2.4 billion birds every year in their natural environment. If you have flower gardens, you are probably aware that cats may be harmful to them as well.

What To Do If Your Cat Is Digging

Your cat may be attracted to your houseplants in a variety of different ways. Digging is one of these behaviors, and I live by the idea that if a cat can dig in anything, they will most likely poop in it as well. Please don’t ask me how I know this. The following are some suggestions for preventing digging from becoming an issue in your home.

Use Less Dirt

This appears to be an obvious answer, but often the most straightforward option is the most successful. Many plants require less earth than others or can be planted in rocky soil, which is far less enjoyable for our feline companions to dig through and enjoy. Some ornamental choices that can light up your home without getting your cat’s paws muddy are succulents and air plants, to name a few.

Barriers

This appears to be an obvious answer, but sometimes the most straightforward approach is the most successful. Many plants require less earth than others or can be planted in rocky soil, which is far less enjoyable for our feline companions to dig through and play in. Some ornamental choices that can light up your home without getting your cat’s paws muddy are succulents and air plants, to name a couple.

  • Pinecones, ornamental rocks and River Rocks, seashells, and Lava Rocks are some of the options.

Aluminum foil can be used as an alternative. Cut portions of the plant and wrap them around the base of the plant to protect it. In most cases, cats are not fond of the selective nature of the sensation of tinfoil beneath their paws.

Chicken Wire And Netting

With the plant growing through a hole in the middle of the chicken wire, it is possible to cover the pot’s base with the wire and secure it by wrapping it around the pot’s base. The purrfect solution to create a cat-proof garden might be right in your backyard. A drawstring may be made by weaving string around the outside edge of the netting to secure it in place. Cut a hole in the center of the drawstring so that the plant may grow through it. Pull the drawstring tight around the base of your container.

Plant Cage To Protect From Cats

With the plant growing through a hole in the middle of the chicken wire, it is possible to cover the pot’s base with the wire and secure it by twisting it around the pot’s base. This could just be the purrfect solution to create a cat-proof garden in your backyard. A drawstring may be made by weaving string around the outside edge of the netting to attach it to the body of the garment. Cut a hole in the center of the drawstring so that the plant may grow through it. Pull the drawstring tight around the base of the container.

  • Deco 79 Metal Cage
  • Deco Rustic Metal Cage Planters
  • Urban Born Glass Terrarium
  • NuVue Products Guard Cover
  • Deco 79 Metal Cage

Bird Cage

A birdcage may or may not be a good choice, depending on your aesthetic objectives. On Amazon, you can purchase a variety of bird-free platforms, tabletops, and hanging birdcages, some of which are more attractive than others. If it can prevent a cat from eating a bird, it should be able to prevent it from eating your plants as well.

Additional Safe Cat Deterrents

A cat repellant would be especially beneficial if your cat is nibbling on leaves or digging in the yard.

Sticky Paws For Plants

The name of the company Sticky Paws offers a wide range of safe cat deterrents, several of which are designed expressly for use on furniture. Plants can benefit from the usage of Adhesive Paws by arranging the sticky sheets in strips across the top of the plant’s pot. This will prevent them from burrowing their hands into the soil. You shouldn’t put the sticky sheets directly on the plant, but there are a range of items available from Sticky Paws, including sprays, that can assist you in training your cat to leave your floral and fauna companions alone, according to the company.

It’s also simple to apply and remove, translucent, and won’t do any harm to your skin.

Taste Deterrent

It is not tempting to cats to consume spicy foods like pepper, cayenne pepper, and bitter apple. Fill a spray bottle halfway with your selected material and spritz the soil and leaves with it. After a few unsuccessful attempts, your cat will come to the conclusion that your plants are not edible. However, every cat is unique, and you may need to experiment with a few different approaches. Mine, on the other hand, enjoy a little spice in their life. It is recommended that you test your spray on a little leaf first to see how it affects the plant before spraying the entire plant.

Smell Deterrent

It is not tempting to cats to consume spicy foods like pepper, cayenne pepper, or bitter apple. Fill a spray bottle halfway with your selected chemical and spritz the soil and foliage with the solution. You’ll notice that your cat becomes less interested in your plants after a few attempts. However, every cat is unique, so you may need to experiment with a few different approaches. A little spice in their life is something that my like. Consider testing your spray on a small leaf first to see how it affects the plant before applying it to the entire plant.

  • Garlic spray, bitter apple spray, and lemon thyme (either fresh or dried)
  • Natural insect repellents, such as orange oil
  • And bitter apple spray.

Out Of Reach, Out Of (Your Cat’s) Mind

Garlic spray, bitter apple spray, and lemon thyme (either fresh or dried); natural insect repellents, such as orange oil; and orange oil.

Final Thoughts

I honestly feel that cats (at least my own) are innocent of any wrongdoing. They’re just too much fun to be around and too interested to be ignored! Hopefully, these suggestions will assist you in maintaining a harmonious relationship with your plants and feline companions.

How to Keep Cats Out of Plants

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How do you keep cats out of plants? Try these expert-recommended tips to protect your indoor potted plants from curious paws.

Some cats can’t resist the temptation of houseplants, and they end up eating them. They’ll chew the leaves, dig in the ground, knock over the pots, and generally wreak havoc on an indoor gardening project. Furthermore, while pet-safe plants are available, consuming potting soil is not only unhealthy, but it is also time-consuming and unpleasant. You can try some of these tactics before giving up on houseplants entirely if this sounds like your cat’s behavior. Dr. Jamie Richardson, medical chief of staff atSmall Door Veterinary, and Diana Ludwiczak, professional pet trainer and CEO ofWolfie’s Place, discuss how to keep cats away from flowers and plants.

Make the Plants Inaccessible

Despite their best efforts, some cats are unable to resist the pull of indoor plants. They’ll chew the leaves, dig in the ground, knock over the pots, and generally wreak havoc on your indoor gardening efforts. Pet-safe plants are available, but eating potting soil is not only unhealthy, but it is also unpleasant to do. You can try some of these tactics before giving up on houseplants entirely if this sounds like your cat’s situation.

Doctor Jamie Richardson, medical head of staff at Small Door Veterinary, and Diana Ludwiczak, licensed pet trainer and CEO of Wolffie’s Place, discuss how to keep cats away from plants.

Make the Plants Undesirable

Cats are discouraged from wandering about in plants by certain aromas, textures, and noises. Richardson recommends covering the pot and dirt with aluminum foil to keep cats from digging in it. When cats scratch at the pot, she suggests “covering it with double-sided adhesive tape,” according to the author. They don’t like the way certain surfaces feel under their paws, therefore they avoid walking on them. Cats will avoid plants that have an undesirable flavor or scent. Because cats are attracted to the fragrance of citrus, covering the soil with citrus rinds is a typical method of keeping them away from plants.

If you don’t want to leave chunks of fruit in your plants, Ludwiczak recommends “spraying the leaves with an apple cider vinegar solution.” Another approach is to use an acrid, store-bought spray.

Give Cats Their Own Plants

Giving your cats their own plants may seem paradoxical, but giving them their own plants can prevent them from devouring yours. Cats will occasionally consume grass as a source of fiber. As Richardson explains, “It can aid in their digestion and/or assist them in bringing up indigestible furballs.” Most pet stores sell pre-mixed seed packages labeled “cat grass” or “pet grass,” which are essentially the same thing. This pet grass grow kit comprises wheat, oats, rye, barley, and flax seed, among other grains and seeds.

Provide Other Forms of Entertainment

It’s possible that your cats are torturing your plants because they’re bored. Give children engaging puzzle toys to keep them entertained. Doc and Phoebe’s indoor hunting feeder, which Richardson considers to be one of Small Door Veterinary’s favorites, receives high acclaim from Richardson. Then you fill it with cat food and conceal it in order to stimulate your cat’s natural hunting instincts. An empty toilet paper roll may be used to create a do-it-yourself replica of this cat toy. In the event that your cat appears uninterested in new toys, Richardson recommends “considering spraying yourcat’s enrichment items with an apheromone spray to stimulate usage.” Your cats will be less prone to get into mischief if they are given adequate mental stimulation.

Clean the Litter Box

Cats who go to the toilet in potted plants may be doing so to avoid using the litter box for a variety of different reasons. Increasing the frequency with which you scoop the litter may be the answer. Cleaning the litter box thoroughly on a regular basis is a good idea, and giving the empty box a nice washing before refilling it doesn’t harm too. Cats may also avoid a litter box that is too tiny for their size and needs.

Richardson recommends that you experiment with different types of litter or different boxes. It’s possible that you’ll have to test a few different combinations before you discover the appropriate one for your cat. Some cats prefer a covered box, while others prefer a tray with holes in it.

Train Your Cat to Stay Out of Plants

Cats aren’t known for their ability to do tricks. The command to sit is simple to teach your dog; however, your cat will most likely ignore the demand. Cats, on the other hand, are responsive to behavioral instruction. Every cat had to be taught to use a litter box before they could be released. They can be taught to keep off the counters, to stop clawing at the furniture, and to stop eating the houseplants if they practice these behaviors. Humane training strategies should be used to educate your cat which actions are acceptable and which are not.

See also:  How To Make A Cat Poop

When your cat uses the appropriate toys or litter box, reward him or her with affection, praise, food, and other forms of positive reinforcement.

Plants that have been injured are more prone to disease and yellow leaves.

How to Keep Cats Out of House Plants

There is no infallible cure, but there are several things you can do to make it much more difficult for your cat to destroy your home plants. Consider implementing any of these suggestions if you’re weary of seeing your foliage torn and filthy, no pun intended.

Put Plants in Decorative Bird Cages

Smaller plants that your cat enjoys knocking off of window ledges and shelves should be placed in attractive bird cages to prevent this from happening. All that is required is that you remove the top of the cage from its base, place one or more plants inside, and then replace the top. Hang the cage on a hook or curtain rod to provide additional protection.

Cover Soil With Pebbles

You can use rocks to prevent your cat from excavating her way out of your pots and to make them less appealing places for her to discharge herself. This may be accomplished by covering the top of the soil with smooth pebbles that are at least one inch in diameter or bigger, whichever is more. Smaller pebbles should not be used since your pet may mistake it for litter and see it as an invitation to use the planter as her new litter box.

Spray Plants With Bitter Spray

If your cat enjoys chewing on your houseplants, making them taste unpleasant may be the solution to the problem. Bitter spray should be applied gently to the leaves (both on the top and bottom) and stems before allowing it to dry. Place each plant in its customary location and keep a watch on your cat’s reaction when she tries to nibble a leaf from one of the plants. Though it may take many attempts, she will almost certainly decide that she no longer wishes to create a salad out of your precious ficus.

Try Using Foil

As aluminum foil is often disliked by cats (in terms of its texture, taste, and smell), it can serve as another effective barrier to your cat’s fixation with it.

Consider covering the pot in aluminum foil, or at the very least placing crumpled aluminum foil on top of the dirt.

Put Plants in a Screened Aquarium

If you have a collection of small to medium-sized plants, putting them in an aquarium with a screen to keep your cat in the look-but-don’t-touch mode may be all you need to keep your cat in this mode. Because of the screen top, there is some air circulation, but your cat will have to keep her claws on her own back.

Cover Soil With Citrus-Scented Landscape Fabric

If you have a collection of small to medium-sized plants, putting them in an aquarium with a screen to keep your cat in the look-but-don’t-touch mode may be all you need to keep him entertained. Because of the screen top, there is some air circulation, but your cat will have to restrain her claws.

Sprinkle Lemon Peels Around Plant Base

Most cats dislike lemon, so don’t throw away the peels after you’ve squeezed the juice from your lemons. As an alternative, cut them into strips and put them on top of the dirt surrounding the plant. If you reapply the peels on a weekly basis, this treatment will be more beneficial for you. You may also use a combination of lemon and orange peels if you want.

Give Kitty His Own Plant

When it comes to keeping your cat away from your plants, giving her some of her own might be the most effective answer. Cat grass kits are available at many pet supply stores, and they allow you to cultivate safe grass that your cat may snack on anytime she wants. Place a planter with this grass in a convenient location where your cat can readily get it, and she may be content enough to leave your plants alone.

Keep Trying Until Something Works

Despite the fact that some cats are devoted plant scavengers, it is feasible to keep your cat away from your plants. With such a wide range of alternatives available, you’re sure to find something that works for you and your pet! Simply keep trying new things until you discover something that works. LoveToKnow Media was founded in the year 2021. All intellectual property rights are retained.

How to Keep Cats From Getting Into Your Plants

Returning to the abode For the most part, cats are kind and playful, but every now and then their mischievous side comes out and they climb atop counters, get into your plants, and knock items on the floor—all it’s part of their appeal. The majority of the time, when cats knock things over or rip them to bits, it is not because they are attempting to be a nuisance; instead, they are just honing their hunting abilities. Toying with their prey is common among cats, and using their paws to shove that potted plant off the counter is really a technique for them to keep their hunting abilities strong.

7 Tips to keep cats out of potted plants

The use of rocks to surround your plant will discourage your cat from digging in the ground, while also enabling water to travel between the rocks, allowing the plants to be watered more readily.

2. Place orange peels around them.

The scent of citrus is unpleasant to cats, so spreading orange peels around your plants in a circle might serve as a useful barrier to keep your feline friend at far.

3. Get a plant your cat won’t like.

Rosemary is a strongly scented herb, which implies that cats are not particularly fond of it.

In addition, they are lovely and will leave your home smelling wonderful!

4. Get a plant your cat will love!

Given the strong scent of rosemary, cats are not likely to be fond of the herb. Apart from that, they are stunning and will leave your home feeling wonderful!

5. Try something sticky.

Due to the fact that cats loathe sticky substances, it is a good idea to place a layer of double-stick tape over the opening of each plant’s container to keep their paws away from the plants.

6. COVER THEM UP.

If all else fails, you can always use chicken wire to make barriers around your plants, or you can put plants in terrariums that your cat won’t be able to get into.

7. Provide a distraction.

Providing children with a plethora of toys to keep them occupied is an excellent strategy to discourage this tendency. If you provide them with fishing pole toys that dangle off a counter so that they can occupy themselves, you may be able to prevent them from getting their claws into something valuable. Despite the fact that the majority of cats are uninterested in houseplants, there are always a handful that can’t keep their paws off the stems, stalks, and leaves of the plants. Aside from that, it’s critical to ensure that none of the plants in your home are toxic to cats.

Check out our Spring Gardening Suggestions blog to find out more about which plants are safe for your feline companions, as well as some useful gardening tips just in time for the spring season!

How To Keep Cats Out Of Houseplants

As a member in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, which is an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a mechanism for sites to make advertising fees by linking to Amazon.com, we may receive advertising commissions. Because I am an Amazon Associate, I receive money when people make eligible purchases. It is not necessary to engage in a continual struggle to keep cats away from houseplants. The ways I shall demonstrate in this piece will help you to keep cats from eating, digging, or knocking over plants, as well as from pooping in potted plants.

  1. I’m not sure about you, but my indoor plants are a big hit with my cats.
  2. Keeping cats away from houseplants may be a tedious endeavor.
  3. Cats have been a part of my life almost as long as I’ve kept indoor plants.
  4. Heck, my most recent kitty felt it was amusing to take plants right out of their pots, which is a real pain in the neck!

Why Is My Cat Eating My Plants?

There are a variety of reasons why cats consume plant matter. It may be because they’re tired and a little naughty, or it could just be because they enjoy the flavor. When I inquired about it with our veterinarian, she informed me that they occasionally do it to attempt to soothe an upset stomach or to force themselves to vomit when they are not feeling well (ewe!).

It’s amusing how some cats appear to be infatuated with houseplants, while others appear to be completely uninterested in them. Over the years, I’ve had various cats, and only a handful of them were interested in my plants and ate them.

How To Keep Cats Out Of Houseplants

Over the years, I’ve developed a variety of techniques for keeping cats away from houseplants. All of these strategies are simple to implement, and they are all quite successful. It is therefore unnecessary to remove your indoor plants (or your cat, shocker!) from their current location. The following are my top recommendations for keeping houseplants safe from cats. Related: 15 Pet-Friendly Indoor House Plants (with Pictures) My cat accidentally knocked over a plant.

Train Your Cat To Stay Away From Plants

The various ways I’ve discovered over the years to keep cats away from houseplants are too many to mention. They are all straightforward and quite efficient, which makes them ideal for beginners. It is thus unnecessary to remove your indoor plants (or your cat, shocker!) from the house. The following are my best recommendations for keeping houseplants safe from cats. In related news, here are 15 pet-friendly indoor house plants. By my cat, I accidentally knocked down a plant.

Cover The Pot To Keep Your Kitty Out

Another successful method of keeping cats away from houseplants is to place a barrier over the pot. Due to the dislike of my cats for aluminum foil, I cover the pots with aluminum foil. It’s unsightly, but it serves its purpose well in deterring them. You might also try an other type of barrier, such as chicken wire or double-sided tape, if that doesn’t work for you. However, caution should be exercised while using tape. I’m unable to use it since one of my cats (weirdo!) has attempted to ingest the cassette.

Cover The Soil To Stop Cats From Digging In Plants

If you don’t like the concept of covering the entire pot, you might try using a soil cover as a substitute for that. If you want to be creative with your indoor plants, this is a good alternative because it allows you to do so while adding a beautiful touch to them. In the beginning, I used used wine corks to cover the soil of one of my bigger plants, which was perfect for my kitten. Not only did it prevent her from digging in the dirt, but it also caused her to lose interest in the plant as a whole, according to her.

All of them are effective methods of preventing cats from digging up plants’ soil (and pooping in them).

Corks were a favorite play for my kitten, and I used to find them all over the house while I was looking for them.

Cats burrowing in plants may be prevented by using soil cover.

Use Repellent Spray To Keep Cats Out Of Houseplants

Another option to consider is cat repellent spray, which is effective at keeping cats away from houseplants (it also keeps them from chewing on your shoes, but that’s a tale for another day). Bitter apple spray, which is non-toxic and has a lovely odor, is what I put on my plants. Cats, on the other hand, are repulsed by the taste and scent of it. As a result, not only will they keep away, but it will also discourage cats from devouring plants.

In the past, I’ve put this spray on plants to keep cats away, and I’ve never had any issues with it. However, like with any other form of spray, it’s essential to test it on a few leaves first before spraying the entire plant to ensure there isn’t any harm.

Protect Indoor Plants From Your Fur Baby

Making a barrier around the entire plant is another strategy for keeping cats away from houseplants. This solution is ideal for keeping little plants safe from nosy cats and other animals. Don’t worry, I’m not referring to the practice of covering your plants in aluminum foil or chicken netting. You may also use a little indoor greenhouse, a fundecorative birdcage, a beautifulglass cloche, or a cutewire plant cover to keep your plants looking nice. Besides looking great, it will also prevent your cat from knocking over plants, gnawing on them, or digging (or pooping!) in the ground.

Put Your Plants Out Of Reach

The most efficient approach to keep cats away from houseplants is to place them in an area where they can’t be reached by the feline companion. If there are certain plants that your cat like, cultivate them in a separate room from where your other pets are allowed. One more nice spot is somewhere up high where your cat can’t get to it, such as hanging from the ceiling or sitting on top of your kitchen cupboards. The only problem with this is that it makes it more difficult for you to get in touch with them as well.

However, you should experiment with a couple of your preferred selections to determine which one works best for you.

Do you find it difficult to maintain your indoor plants alive and growing throughout the year?

Throughout the long, dark winter months, it will demonstrate exactly what you need to do in order to maintain attractive and healthy houseplants.

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Please share your best practices for keeping cats away from houseplants in the comments area below this article.

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