How To Make A Cat Feel Comfortable In A New Home

How to Make a Cat Feel Comfortable in a New Home

Many cat owners find it difficult to relocate with their feline companion. When it comes to cats, they are essentially territorial creatures, and moving from the house they’re accustomed to to a new home may be stressful for even the most laid-back of felines. Making your cat feel at ease in a new environment, on the other hand, is part of your responsibility as their caregiver, so it’s crucial to be prepared before you begin. For cats, relocating to a new house is comparable to moving into their first home on the day they were brought home from the shelter.

We’ve already discussed broad methods to make relocating with cats less stressful (for both you and your feline companion), but in this section, we’ll focus specifically on techniques to make your cat feel comfortable in a new home.

How long does it take for a cat to feel comfortable after a move?

The amount of time it will take your cat to become acclimated to their new home is primarily dependent on his or her disposition.. Some cats will feel right at home right away, and they won’t take much more than a brief orientation to the location of their litter box, food dish, and water bowl/fountain. Other cats, on the other hand, may take several days, weeks, or even months to begin to feel secure in their new area. When it comes to time, the greatest thing you can do is to let your cat to go at their own speed.

Moving when a significant portion of your comfort and sense of security is entwined with your territorial base is an even more traumatic experience.

Step-by-step guide to helping your cat feel comfortable in a new home

While you won’t be able to push your cat to adjust to their new environment any faster than they are ready, you may take steps to make their move into a new home as smooth as possible. Keep in mind to transfer your cat’s records to their new veterinarian as soon as possible before or immediately after your relocation so that you can focus on settling everyone in while you concentrate on getting everything in order.

Move them in a cat carrier

  • Despite the fact that your cat despises being in the carrier, it is a secure place for them to be. Your cat should be in a carrier while you’re loading and unloading the moving truck to ensure that they don’t get out and get into something dangerous. It will also assist in keeping them contained within a familiar environment until they are ready to venture out and explore
  • And

Choose a home base

  • In order to avoid allowing your cat to wander free in your new house right away, choose one place where they can begin to feel at ease. Almost any room with a door can suffice, however an office or bedroom are the best options. In one corner of the room, fill up their litter box and set it aside. In another corner of the room, set out fresh food and drink for them (if it isn’t time for a meal, placing a couple of treats in their food bowl will suffice). Make sure there’s a scratcher and some other toys in the room, too. While keeping the door to the room closed, open their carrier and let them to step out when they are ready to do so. After that, let them to look around. The idea is to allow them to become acclimated to a small section of the house first, so that they may become accustomed to the new odors before allowing them to explore deeper. Depending on how they’re doing, you can keep them in the room for a few hours or up to a week, depending on their condition. During their stay, be sure you check on them on a frequent basis and shower them with affection and attention

Expand their territory

  • Once your cat has been accustomed to one area of the house, you may let them to wander more freely across the house. It is best to keep their litter box in the same location for the time being, but you can relocate their food bowl and water bowl/fountain to more permanent locations. Always double-check that your home is in a cat-friendly condition before allowing your cat to roam free. Before allowing your cat to leave their “home base,” make sure there aren’t any potentially hazardous packaging items in the vicinity of the door. Plastic wrap, packing tape, and twine, as well as any sharp instruments such as scissors or box cutters, are all potentially harmful. Of course, you are welcome to leave out a large number of empty cardboard boxes as well.

Check in

  1. It is possible to let your cat roam more freely if they have been accustomed to one particular room of the house. For the time being, you should keep their litter box in the same location, but you can relocate their food dish and water bowl/fountain to their permanent locations if necessary. Check to see that your home is in a cat-friendly condition before allowing your cat to roam free. Make sure there are no potentially hazardous packing items in your cat’s “home base” before allowing them to go outside for the first time. Plastic wrap, packaging tape, and twine, as well as any sharp instruments such as scissors or box cutters, are all potentially dangerous materials to work with. Of course, you are welcome to leave out a large number of empty cardboard boxes.

Signs that your cat is stressed out after a move

Once your cat has been accustomed to a particular room of the house, you may let them to wander more freely. For the time being, you should keep their litter box in the same location, but you can relocate their food bowl and water bowl/fountain to their permanent locations. Always double-check that your home is in a cat-friendly state before allowing your cat to roam free. Before allowing your cat to leave their “home base,” make sure there aren’t any potentially hazardous packaging items lying about.

Plastic wrap, packing tape, and twine, as well as any sharp instruments such as scissors or box cutters, are all potentially dangerous. However, please feel free to leave out a large number of empty cardboard boxes as well;

  • Once your cat has been accustomed to one particular room in the house, you may let them to wander more freely. You should leave their litter box in the same location for the time being, but you may relocate their food bowl and water bowl/fountain to their permanent locations. Always check to see that your home is in a cat-friendly state before allowing your cat to roam free. Before allowing your cat to leave their “home base,” double-check that there are no potentially hazardous packaging items lying about. Plastic wrap, packing tape, and thread are all potentially harmful, as are any sharp instruments like as scissors or box cutters. However, please feel free to leave out a large number of empty cardboard boxes as well.

Once your cat has been accustomed to one area of the house, you may let them to wander more freely across the house. It is best to keep their litter box in the same location for the time being, but you can relocate their food bowl and water bowl/fountain to more permanent locations. Always double-check that your home is in a cat-friendly condition before allowing your cat to roam free. Before allowing your cat to leave their “home base,” make sure there aren’t any potentially hazardous packaging items in the vicinity of the door.

Of course, you are welcome to leave out a large number of empty cardboard boxes as well.

Final takeaways

It’s critical to make your cat feel at ease in a new environment, and it’s preferable to do it gradually rather than rushing them into a scenario where they don’t feel comfortable. Your cat should be back to their regular selves within a few days, and they will most likely be enthusiastic about exploring their new environment as well. Provide them with plenty of care, especially shortly after the transfer, to ensure that they are as happy as possible in their new home. Keep them on the same feeding schedule as well, since this will help them feel more at ease in an unusual environment.

You can also install a cat tree in front of a window so they can have a glimpse of the outside world.

Not only does it help that everything is spanking new, but they still have you!

4 Ways to Make Your New Cat Feel at Home

It’s critical to make your cat feel at ease in a new environment, and it’s preferable to do it gradually rather than rushing them into a scenario where they don’t feel protected. In a short period of time, your cat should be back to their old selves, and they may even be looking forward to exploring their new surroundings. Provide them with plenty of care, especially immediately after the relocation, to ensure that they are as happy as possible in their new home. In addition, keep them on their regular feeding schedule, since this will help them feel more at ease in a new environment.

You can also install a cat tree in front of a window so that they can have a glimpse of the outside world as well.

When a cat is moved into a new home, he or she doesn’t take as long to adjust as when he or she is first introduced to the house. They still have you because everything is spanking new, which helps. During this period, simply provide extra TLC and handle any signs of stress as soon as they appear.

Give Her the Scents of Home

Cats create pheromones, which are naturally occurring chemical molecules that they utilize to advertise ownership of territory and communicate with other cats. Pheromones are produced by both male and female cats. A pheromone is released by your cat when she rubs her face against an object, or even against you, in order to convey that the thing is familiar and safe. The Comfort Zone Calming Diffuser allows her to relax and feel more comfortable in her own skin (and helps to reduce potentially dangerous roaming).

Diffusers have a 30-day shelf life and are highly recommended by veterinarians.

Set the Stage

Before you bring her home, make sure you have everything you’ll need for her, including the following supplies:

  • It is possible to purchase a basic plastic tray, covered boxes (some of which are disguised as furniture or potted plants), uncovered boxes with odorless litter, or automated, self-cleaning versions of the litter box. Placing it in a less-trafficked section of the home (noisy, busy locations may deter her from using it) and keeping it away from her food bowl are good ideas. Drink plenty of water and feed your new cat frequently. She may be agitated from the journey and want a drink to help calm her emotions. Offer her nourishment, but don’t be shocked if she doesn’t seem to have much of an appetite during the first few days. Accessories and toys: A few entertaining toys may help you bond with your cat, and cat furniture can provide her with a comfortable perch from which to observe the world. Some cats enjoy being brushed, and you may find yourself needing to cut her claws, so make a trip to your local pet store to stock up on all of the essentials.

Let Her Set the Pace

It is possible to purchase a basic plastic tray, covered boxes (some of which are disguised as furniture or potted plants), uncovered boxes with odorless litter, or automated, self-cleaning versions of the litter box and the litter. Placing it in a less-trafficked section of the home (noisy, busy locations may deter her from using it) and keeping it away from her feeding bowl are good ideas; Drink plenty of water and feed your new cat frequently. She may be agitated from the trip and want a drink to help calm her anxieties.

A few amusing toys can help you and your cat develop a stronger relationship.

It’s common for cats to like being groomed, and you may need to cut her claws, so visit your local pet store to stock up on all of the essentials.

Enable Safe Explorations

You may expect your new cat to ultimately investigate every nook and crevice of her new home, which will almost certainly include counters, bookshelves, and the tops of cupboards if she is able to get to them (you may be surprised how high she can leap). While she’s exploring your home, be sure to put away any breakable items, remove any paperclips or other small objects that kittens could ingest, and don’t leave any enticing morsels of food out for her to find. Access should be denied to any areas where a cat could be tempted to hide or investigate and become hazardous.

Visit the Shelter Pet Project to learn about animal shelters and pet adoption groups in your area, or to discover a shelter or pet adoption group near you.

Cats and Moving to a New Home: Making the Transition

You should expect your new cat to ultimately investigate every nook and crevice of her new home, which will almost certainly include counters, bookshelves, and the tops of cupboards if she is able to get to those areas (you may be surprised how high she can leap). Make sure to put away breakable things, remove paperclips or other small objects that kittens may ingest, and don’t leave any enticing morsels of food out for her to discover while she’s inspecting your home.

Access should be denied to any areas where a cat may hide or investigate in a harmful manner. The moment has come for you to meet your new best buddy now that you understand the fundamentals. Find animal shelters or pet adoption groups near you by visiting the Shelter Pet Project.

Preparing Your Cat to Move

Information should be up to date. Make certain that your cat’s identification collar is safe and up to date. Prior to moving, it is recommended that you microchip your cat to avoid the possibility that they would become afraid and run away. When you keep your microchip information up to date, reunions are far more probable. Create a “new normal” in your life. Maintain as much of your cat’s typical routine as possible in the weeks leading up to the relocation. Cats might get stressed by the unexpected presence of new individuals and moving things, as well as the departure of their favorite furniture or objects.

  • This aids in the creation of a new usual environment for your cat.
  • Introduce the cat carrier to the scene.
  • Select a carrier that is well-secured, well-designed for travel, and comfortable for your child.
  • Fill the carrier with sweets, a beloved blanket, and familiar toys to help your child develop pleasant associations with the carrier.
  • As the packing and moving operations grow more frenetic, placing the carrier in a peaceful location will encourage the cat to seek sanctuary there.
See also:  How To Stop A Cat From Peeing On Furniture

Moving Your Cat

While people are moving into and out of your present residence on the big day, keep your cat safely contained in the carrier. If your relocation involves a lengthy road journey, be certain that your cat is accustomed to traveling in a carrier. It may be tempting, but resist the temptation to open your carrier in the middle of the journey to calm your cat. Because of this, your cat is more likely to make a break for it in unknown surroundings.

Continued

Once you’ve arrived, keep your cat safely contained in their carrier while you cat-proof your new house. Close any windows and doors, and tuck away any electrical cables or plugs that your cat may get tangled in if you don’t want him to become caught. First, introduce one room at a time. Choose a room that has things and furnishings that you are familiar with. Allow your cat to come out of the carrier and explore the room after the area has been secured. Keep your cat in a single room when there is a lot of activity in the new house for his or her own safety and security.

Make a time to quietly spend time with your cat in their temporary area to assist them in becoming used to their new surroundings. If your cat appears to be apprehensive, you may want to confine them to a single room for a few days to allow them adequate time to become used to the new environment.

Things to Look Out For

Cats that have gotten away. When a cat is relocated to a new region, it is usual for him to seek to return to his old haunts to relieve himself. Always keep your cat indoors at all times for his or her own safety. Even if you want to let your cat to go outside at some point, keep them indoors until you are certain that they have connected with their new environment. It is preferable to confine your cat to the house for a minimum of two weeks. You may help your cat form good associations with your new house by feeding him more frequently with small meals and include more treats and playtime in his day than he would otherwise get.

  1. For starters, call the cat in after ten minutes and gradually increase the amount of time you spend outside.
  2. In the event that you decide to let your cat to roam the neighborhood, remain watchful and listen for the noises of a catfight.
  3. Events that are stressful.
  4. Ensure that your cat remains indoors, safe, and secure in their new home by taking additional measures.

How can I help my cat adjust to a new home? – RSPCA Knowledgebase

Due to the fact that cats are territorial creatures, relocation may be a highly unpleasant event for them. It is possible to lessen your cat’s worry and make the transfer between homes as pleasant as possible by following a few simple guidelines. Make certain that your cat is transported between houses in a proper cat carrier with bedding that smells familiar (their favourite blanket). Due to the fact that most cats do not appreciate traveling, you should expect your cat to be concerned when you arrive at your new residence.

  • In addition, make certain that all doors and windows are closed, and that any other escape routes, such as fireplaces, are closed as well.
  • Prepare a room for your cat – Provisions for them should include a comfy bed (with a familiar blanket and toys), a litter tray, food and drink dishes, and a litter box.
  • Spend some peaceful time with your cat as they investigate their new surroundings.
  • Making some more rooms open to them over the following couple of days will allow the cat to investigate them at his leisure in the meanwhile.
  • In order to continue to provide your cat with access to your garden while avoiding the chance of them being lost or running away, you will need to think carefully about how you will do so without endangering their safety by allowing them to roam freely.
  • Leaving the front door open as an escape route allows them to run to the safety of their new home if they are startled by a loud noise or rapid movement in the house.
  • Allow them to spend only a few minutes outside at a time at first, gradually increasing the amount of time they spend outside until they are familiar with their new surroundings.
  • The RSPCA Australia recommends cat owners to keep their cats indoors at all times, or at the very least from nightfall to morning.
  • It also allows you to spend more quality time with your cat during this period.
  • Keep in mind to notify the Australian Animal Registry of any changes to your address so that if your cat escapes and goes missing, she may be immediately returned to you by local veterinarian clinics and animal rescue organizations.

Also, don’t forget to update your cat’s identification tag with any new information if it becomes necessary.

Ways to Make Your Cat’s Move to a New Home Safe and Stress-Free

Time allotted for reading: 4 minutes People who used to reside on our block had moved away when I was a small girl, and I missed them. Although they had left their pregnant cat behind in the moving truck, neighbors found it had given birth to a litter of kittens approximately a week after they had driven away in it. It infuriated me that someone would discard a cat in such a careless manner. However, now that I’m older, I’m beginning to question whether it was an accident. Is it possible that the mom cat became alarmed by all the noise and fled the house to seek refuge?

However, there is little doubt that relocating is traumatic for everyone involved – particularly for cats – and I will likely never know what occurred (though, happily, I do know the cat and kittens were rehomed by the local animal shelter).

Fear Free Certified North Shore Veterinary Hospital in Duluth – the first Fear Free clinic in Minnesota – is owned by Michael Hargrove, DVM, MBA, CBA, who believes it’s crucial to know that cats prefer predictable situations.

“Can there be a more significant shift than fully altering their surroundings – such as relocating to a new home?”

Transition Tips

Your strategy to relocating with a cat may alter significantly based on whether you’re moving across the nation or simply across town if you’re moving with your cat. Dr. Hargrove and his three cats, Yori, Kiko, and Meg, just relocated to a new home in his hometown with his family. Prior to and after the relocation, he housed them at his animal hospital, which had kennels where cats may socialize, hiding areas, and soft music to ensure that they were comfortable. In order for him to not have to worry about the door being open, “weird” movers being in the house, and the noise and bustle while packing up the house, “I provided them with the finest setting that I could provide them.” This is perhaps the best case in which you can truly minimize the interruption to their life,” says the expert.

Before the Move

In the event that boarding is not a possibility, build a secure space for cats that will be the last to be packed. Make it pleasant for them by incorporating a litter box, water, snacks, a cat tree, a pheromone diffuser such as Feliway, toys, and other items that cats enjoy having around. When you’re finished, post a notice on the door that says, “Do not open – cats inside,” so that movers or friends don’t accidentally open it and let the cats escape. You’ll want to prepare your cats for their carriers in the same way you would prepare them for any other type of travel, including a trip to the veterinarian.

Positive connections may be created by feeding your cat while it is in the carrier.

In order for them to feel more comfortable, make the carrier more enticing before moving day.

Lastly, do not wash the blankets, towels, and other bedding that your cats will be using throughout the transfer — they will find it comforting to smell their own aroma while in transit and at their new home.

During the Move

If boarding is not an option, designate a safe room for cats that will be the last to be packed while the house is being packed. Make it pleasant for them by having a litter box, water, snacks, a cat tree, a pheromone diffuser such as Feliway, toys, and other items that cats enjoy in their environment. Install a sign on the door that says “Do not open – cats inside” so that moving crews or friends don’t accidentally open the door and allow the cats to flee into the house. You’ll want to prepare your cats for their carriers in the same way you would prepare them for any other type of travel – even a trip to the vet.

Prepare your cat’s mind for success by feeding him inside the carrier.

“Make the carrier more enticing before you plan to move so that they will be more comfortable.” Pheromones and drugs for anxiety or motion sickness are available from your veterinarian for cats that find automobile travel distressing.

  • Everyone’s cat should be transported in his or her own carrier. Place the carrier on the floor in front of the passenger seat. A blanket should be placed around the carrier’s perimeter on three sides so that your cat may glance out or feel concealed, depending on his desire
  • Music that is peaceful and not too loud or out of control should be played in the automobile. Never leave a cat unattended in a hot vehicle. Make sure to schedule pit stops properly.

At Your New Home

You should establish another secure area that will be equipped last when you get at your location. Allow your cat to explore the other rooms of the house after the rest of the house is finished, but preserve access to the secure room. Keep an eye out for where they could be hiding, but don’t go searching for them. “The more you are able to offer them with their typical, familiar atmosphere, the happy they will be,” Hargrove adds. Update your pet’s microchip company’s contact information as soon as feasible, and locate a new veterinarian as soon as possible.

Thus, if your cat experiences a health problem, you won’t have to waste time looking for a veterinarian.

Consider looking for Cat Friendly Practices as well as those that are recognized by the American Animal Hospital Association for top-notch veterinary services.

“I cannot guarantee that you will be able to make a cat completely stress-free throughout a transfer.

Kenneth Martin, a board-certified veterinary behaviorist, and/or Debbie Martin, a veterinary technician expert in behavior, have both read and revised this article for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

Award-winning journalist Jen Reeder is former president of the Dog Writers Association of America.

The date of publication is April 12, 2021.

How to make a cat comfortable in a new home

Regardless matter how stressful and difficult the process of relocating is, arriving in your new home and beginning a fresh new life in a brand new world is likely to fill you with excitement and joy in equal measure. Unfortunately, the same cannot be true for your cat; your feline companion is likely to be just as stressed in the new house as they were during the relocation process. Cats are territorial creatures, and being in an unusual environment causes them to become uneasy and scared of the unknown.

The kitten may be confused, terrified, and agitated when they first arrive in their new home; you must introduce them to their new habitat gradually and assist them in adjusting to their new circumstances.

See also:  How To Introduce Dog And Cat

How can you ensure that your small pal is happy and comfortable following the relocation?

Here’s how to acclimate a cat to a new environment while instilling a sense of security and belonging in your cat.

How to introduce a cat to a new home

If you want your cat to feel at peace in your new home, he or she has to become familiar with it. Your small pal, on the other hand, needs to feel comfortable and secure before they can become thrilled about exploring their new surroundings (and safety should be your top priority too whenmoving with cats, of course). As a result, while relocating a cat, it is recommended that you do the following:

1. Prepare a sanctuary room for your pet:

  • Choose a small, quiet room in your new home where you can put your cat right away after you move in – this will make it simpler for your feline companion to adjust to a smaller place (a whole new house may be daunting), and they will feel safer (and really be safer) in a limited environment
  • Check the environment for any risks, make sure all windows and doors are securely secured (to avoid escape attempts), and make sure there are no lingering odours from prior dogs in the room
  • Preparing the room for your cat’s arrival means bringing in familiar objects such as his litter box, his bed, a scratching post, his water bowl, food dish and favorite toys, as well as the blankets, cushions and chairs that he liked to lay on in your previous house. These products will give your cat with a sense of security and will assist him in adjusting to his new surroundings. Provide a safe hiding spot — Cats are known to hide when they are afraid, therefore it is critical that they have a secure area to hide during the painful post-relocation time. If you want to leave an empty cardboard box in the sanctuary room (with an old towel or blanket inside that smells like your former house), you can drape a throw over a chair or a sofa, leave a closet door ajar, or any combination of these things.

2. Let your cat get comfortable in the safe room:

  • Keep your cat in the carrier that it traveled in until the sanctuary room is ready. Toss the carrier into the specified room, walk in and lock the door behind you before setting it down on the floor and opening it. Your cat should be allowed to come out when they’re ready — the carrier is a secure environment for your pet, so they may choose to remain inside for a period of time. They will venture out and investigate if they have gained confidence
  • Provide your pet with fresh water, high-quality food, and a few special treats, and make sure he or her knows where the litter box is
  • If your cat runs away as soon as they get out of the carrier, don’t force them to come out. Maintain complete silence in the area while placing some food and one of their favorite toys in plain sight from where they are hiding. The kitten will come out when they believe it is safe to do so
  • Wait a few days before letting your cat out of the room. This will give him time to calm down and you time to unpack the majority of your belongings and pet-proof the rest of your residence. Depending on the cat, it might take up to a week before she is ready to venture outside of the secure area.

3. Carefully introduce your cat to the rest of the home

The sanctuary room may be used as a safe haven for your cat until they are comfortable in the rest of your house. If your cat feels confused or terrified, they can always return to their sanctuary room. Allow your cat to walk around freely and explore at their own speed without being restrained. You should just need to ensure that any external exits are blocked (since it is still too early to let your feline buddy outside) and that your home is as cat-friendly as possible (double-check for dangerous packing materials like plastic wrap and packing tape and sharp objects like scissors or box cutters).

It all depends on how quickly your cat recovers from the stress of the move, but it’s recommended that you keep your feline companion indoors for at least two weeks following the relocation — until they become adjusted to your new surroundings.

After around fifteen minutes, bring the kitten back inside the home with you.

Just make sure your pet is wearing a collar with your phone number on it and that their microchip information is up to date – this will ensure that your small companion can be returned to you in the event that they become separated from you at the new location.

Check see this article for more information:What to Do After Moving into a New Home

How to make a cat feel comfortable in a new home

When attempting to make your cat comfortable in their new home, the first step is to reassure them that everything is alright and that they have nothing to be afraid of. You must assist them in letting go of their tension and relaxing. Here’s how to soothe down a cat after it has been moved:

Unpack your cat’s essentials box

When you first arrive in your new home, take your cat’s essential items (such as their old water bowl and food dish, cat bed and scratching post, favorite toys, and so on) out of the box right away. Not only will you require these items in order to care for your pet’s needs after the move, but they will also provide comfort and security to your frightened friend. For the first few days, your stressed-out cat may not want to eat or play, but the familiar objects will be soothing and reassuring to him or her.

It’s vital to start out gently and give your pet as much time as they need to overcome their nervousness and become used to their new surroundings in the beginning.

Re-introduce your cat’s old routine

Your cat’s sense of normalcy and security will return after their regular routine has been restored to them. Consequently, feed your pet at the same time as you did in your previous home, turn out the lights at the same time as before, and so on. When your cat has a set schedule, it will be much easier for him to adjust to his new environment.

Spend as much time as possible with your feline friend

In order to make a cat comfortable and happy in a new environment, nothing beats surrounding them with love and attention. No doubt, you’ll be extremely busy with urgent post-relocation tasks in your first few weeks in your new location, but you must make time for your cat – talk to them, pet them, brush their coats, play with them, encourage them to explore their new environment, and so on. If you have any questions about this, please contact us. Try to think of a creative approach to express your affection for your small pal while also assuring them that nothing has changed since you moved in together.

Related:How to Make Adjustments After Relocating

Watch out for signs of depression

In a similar way to people, cats are extremely susceptible when they are pulled out of their comfort zone – your feline companion may become extremely agitated by the rapid change in their environment and become depressed as a result. It is therefore critical to closely monitor your cat’s behavior following the relocation and to be on the lookout for concerning signs such as loss of appetite, lack of enthusiasm, lethargy, excessive meowing, excessive scratching, hiding and withdrawal from social interactions, aggression, and so forth.

For further information, see How to Overcome Relocation Depression.

Orient your feline companion to his or her new environment gradually, allowing them plenty of time for each acclimatization phase, and being available to them during the stressful post-relocation period. Soon enough, your cat will begin to feel at ease in the new environment – and you will, too.

Settling your cat into a new home

You will naturally want to show your cat that they are secure and welcome in the new home, but you will also need to be patient with them during this transition period. Your cat will adjust to their new home on their own terms and in their own time, and they will be grateful to you for allowing them to do so. Take a peek at our video for tips on acclimatizing your cat to a new environment.

How to prepare your house for a cat

Your cat should have a home base in one of the rooms of your new home. In an ideal world, this room would be a spare bedroom or another room that isn’t very occupied, and it would not have access to a cat flap. A quiet area where you can visit and sit with your new cat from time to time will be preferable if your new cat is a little hesitant at first, as they will need time to adjust to their new surroundings. Some confident and sociable cats may feel at ease in the living room if they prefer being in close proximity to people; but, in a new situation, they will want time and space to ensure that their surroundings are secure, as well as to figure out where everything they require is located.

Give your cat places to hide

Your cat should have a home base in one of the rooms of your new house. A spare room or another room that isn’t too crowded would be perfect for this space, which would not have access to a cat flap. A quiet area where you can visit and sit with your new cat from time to time will be preferable if your new cat is a little hesitant at first, as they will be getting acclimated to their new surroundings. While some confident and friendly cats may feel at ease in the living room if they enjoy being in close proximity to people, when they are introduced to a new environment, they will require time and space to ensure that their surroundings are safe, as well as to figure out where everything they require is located.

Set up your cat’s room with everything they need

Make every effort to ensure that all of your cat’s critical belongings (often referred to as’resources’) are acquired and/or in place before they arrive at their destination. Your cat’s litter box should be positioned in a corner of the room, away from the door, their food area, water bowl, beds, and hiding areas to ensure that it is not disturbed. Food and water bowls should be kept separate from one another, but within easy reach of the ‘hidey holes’ you have established in the room to keep them hidden.

Only toys that your cat may safely play with when you aren’t present should be left in the settling in area, according to the manufacturer.

Make the room comfy and safe

Checking your cat’s room (and the rest of the home if they have access to the rest of the house) to make sure it is secure and free of hazards is essential before allowing them to roam free. Cleaning materials, disinfectants, prescriptions, and any DIY or decorating supplies are examples of items that should be kept locked away. You should also examine to see if there are any plants or flowers in your home that might be harmful to your cat. Your cat will also require a safe, pleasant, and warm sleeping environment.

Some cats like beds and resting sites that are elevated and high up so that they can keep an eye on what’s going on while still feeling safe and protected. Allow your cat to choose from a variety of perches, and remember to remove any valuables from high-up shelves in the room!

Consider using a pheromone diffuser

A relaxing pheromone diffuser, such as aFeliway® Classic Diffuser, may also be beneficial to your cat’s wellbeing. These devices connect to an electrical outlet and release a synthetic version of the pheromone that cats naturally make from smell glands in their cheeks when they are awake. Incorporating one of these into your cat’s settling area at least 24 hours before to their arrival (and preferably as soon as feasible afterwards) can assist to lessen their tension while also making your cat feel safer and more comfortable.

Make sure the whole house is escape-proof

During the first few days, your cat will be unfamiliar with your surroundings and may get fearful. Your cat’s natural tendency will be to flee, so even if there is just a little crack in a window or door, they may make a break for it and escape to the outside. Unless you are convinced that your cat is safe in their room and will not be able to escape, you must keep all windows and front and rear doors locked. Cat flaps and chimneys should be closed and secured in case your cat attempts to escape from their room when they first enter there.

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Transporting your cat to a new home

Ensure that you have a suitable container for your cat when you transport it home. This will keep them safe during the travel. The ideal carrier is robust, reasonably lightweight, secure, and simple to clean. It should also be durable. Ideally, carriers that can be opened from both sides, including the top, are preferred, since this gives you the option of lowering your cat in through the top opening. Remember to put a nice blanket in the bottom of the carrier for comfort, as well as a plastic liner below and a towel or blanket covering it to make your cat feel less exposed throughout the travel.

The first day your cat is home

Ensure that you have a proper container for your cat when you transport it home. This will keep them safe during the trip. The most desirable carrier is one that is robust, yet reasonably lightweight, secure, and simple to clean. In order to allow you to drop your cat in through the top opening, carriers that can be opened from the top as well as the front are the best choices. Remember to put a nice blanket in the bottom of the carrier for comfort, as well as a plastic liner below and a towel or blanket covering it to make your cat feel less exposed throughout the travel.

Settling your cat in their new home

If your cat appears comfortable, confident, and eager to explore after a few days, you can allow them to be released from their enclosure (providing you are not preparing tointroduce your cat to childrenor other pets in the home). During the first few days, your cat will need time to settle in and become comfortable before meeting too many other people, so try to keep the number of guests you have over to a minimum. Your cat may find it simpler if you introduce them to your house one room at a time, returning to their’safe room’ at night after they have been acclimated.

You may find this procedure to be extremely rapid and simple, and they will be settled and wandering freely throughout the house in no time at all.

Let your cat fully settle before letting them outside

Even though you may be tempted to bring your cat out into the yard sooner rather than later, it is typically a good idea to wait at least two to three weeks and up to four to six weeks before exposing them to even more new terrain outdoors. Please call Battersea if your cat seems restless and is regularly waiting at the back door or pacing, clawing, or pawing at the door area. They can provide you with further information regarding the optimum time to begin to allow your cat outside. More information on preparing your cat for the move from the indoors to the outside can be found at How to introduce your cat to the outside.

Interact with your cat on their own terms

Make an effort to allow them control over when and how they connect with you while engaging with your cat, or any cat, for that matter. For example, always let them to initiate any contact with you by allowing them to make the first move. Cats prefer to feel in command, which means that connecting with them in a kind and on their terms is the ideal method of communication. While doing so will not prevent you from providing attention to a cat that requests it, it will assist you in ensuring that you are not overwhelming your cat or causing them to feel worried or afraid in any way.

Six Ways to Make Your Cat Feel at Home

This is sometimes at odds with the way we conduct our lives, particularly when it comes to our personal spaces such as our homes. What can you do to ensure that everyone is on the same page? You can help your cat feel more at ease in your house by following these simple guidelines:

1) Perches

Cats are known to take to the trees while out in the wild. This keeps them hidden from predators and provides them with the ideal vantage point for scanning their region and engaging in opportunistic predation. What methods can you use to incorporate these components into your home? It’s possible that you already have some beautiful architectural elements or furnishings with which to work. This may be accomplished by using fireplace mantels, tall bookshelves, wall shelves, or even the back of a couch or chair as a storage space.

Additionally, rising up from the floor provides him or her with a sense of ease.

These are particularly constructed climbing structures and wall shelves for cats that have been skillfully developed.

2) Connecting to the Outdoors

Cats are known to take to the trees while out in the wild! This keeps them hidden from predators while also providing them with the ideal vantage point for assessing their area and opportunistic hunting opportunities. Which of these features should you include in your home? Some of your architectural elements or furniture may already be in a good condition. This may be accomplished by using fireplace mantels, tall bookcases, wall shelves, or even the back of a couch or chair. While getting up and down, your cat gets to demonstrate both natural agility and grace.

If you are unable to add furniture to your house, you may make use of cat trees or cat clouds to add vertical space. The climbing structures and wall shelves in this set have been thoughtfully built with cats specifically in mind.

3) Hideouts

Cats in the wild are known to hide in abandoned burrows or to blend into the background of a dense canopy of forest when traversing their home zone. The urge of your cat to observe without being seen may be satisfied by a variety of intriguing solutions accessible. In addition to serving as a play tunnel, these beds may also be used as a bed for the children. Some end tables are designed with an enclosure that conceals a cat bed inside it. Perhaps an indoor structure that is a cat’s idea of a doghouse would be appropriate?

However, there are various additional low-cost methods of achieving the same result: To create a hiding spot behind books, drag them to the front of the shelf and place them there.

You may even create a fort out of a blanket or towel draped over a table, just as you did when you were a youngster.

4) Scratch Posts

Given that scratching is inherent in your cat’s nature, providing him or her with an alternative to your furniture, carpets, or curtains is critical. Cats in the wild will scrape their claws on both standing and fallen trees in order to keep their claws in good condition for climbing, hunting, and self-defense. In order to duplicate this activity, a solid scratch post or horizontal surfaces might be employed. They may be created from a variety of materials such as corrugated cardboard, carpet, or natural rope fibers.

5) Feeding

Consider the sort of dish you’re using and where you’re placing it while you’re feeding your child to create a tranquil setting. A dish that causes your cat’s whiskers to bend can be aggravating since he or she utilizes them for navigation, communication, and estimating the width of openings, among other things. Instead, a plate or a shallow dish with short edges would suffice. Your cat will be able to catch bits of kibble without having to use his or her whiskers in the process. When it comes to placement, it’s crucial to understand the challenges of feeding in the wild before making a decision.

When you consider that cats are quite vulnerable while eating, it’s simple to understand why they might be agitated during mealtime.

A dog, or even a little child, might be the culprit.

This might help to put your cat at ease by providing good views of the space surrounding him or her as well as access to additional escape routes.

6) Litter Box

Cats in the wild may choose to make their presence known at certain times. They may also want to keep it a secret at other times. However, it is true that every time a cat goes to the potty, they leave a trail of fragrance that might be used as a kind of communication. As a result, it is not ordinary for people to relieve themselves in various locations and to designate distinct areas for specific tasks. As a result, we’ve put up some rules for litter boxes. Even if you only have one cat, you’ll need one litter box for each cat in the house, plus one extra; or one litter box for each floor of your home, even if you only have one cat.

This helps to reduce territorial behavior while also allowing for greater flexibility in application. Also, keep in mind that your litter boxes should be placed in a peaceful area that does not see a lot of traffic. Even cats appreciate the opportunity to be alone.

How to Move With a Cat

Moving to a new house is a stressful experience for both humans and their pets. The majority of cats are sensitive creatures who despise change, which makes relocation one of the most traumatic experiences that they may go through. Stress has been shown to have a detrimental influence on the health and behavior of cats. Fortunately, there are methods for reducing your cat’s stress levels before to, during, and after your relocation.

Before the Move

Transferring to a new residence may be a stressful experience for both humans and animals. Moving is one of the most traumatic situations a cat may go through since most cats are sensitive creatures that loathe change. Stress has been shown to have a detrimental influence on the health and behavior of pets, including your cat. Because of this, you may lower your cat’s stress levels before, during, and after your relocation.

During the Move

Moving to a new house may be stressful for both humans and their pets. The majority of cats are sensitive creatures that despise change, which makes relocation one of the most traumatic experiences they may go through. Stress may have a bad influence on the health and behavior of your cat. Fortunately, there are methods for reducing your cat’s stress levels before to, during, and after your relocation..

After the Move

In your new house, create a “safe area” for your cat, which should have a litter box, a scratching pad, toys, and water dishes. Place one or two empty boxes in the room to be used for hiding or for playing games. Scents that are familiar to your cat might assist to soothe him. Maintain your personal aroma in the space by bringing some of your own clothing into it. Bring a blanket or towel that has the odors of your childhood home with you. It is important to ensure that the room is safe and does not have access to a crawl space or other places where your cat may escape or become trapped.

  1. Depending on the cat, this might take anything from a few days to many weeks.
  2. Leave the carrier open for your cat to emerge naturally; do not force him out of the container.
  3. Others would choose to remain in the carrier or hide in another part of the room, while others will be eager to investigate the surroundings.
  4. Set up a pheromone diffuser in the room or spray the mattress with pheromones to help you sleep better.
  5. While you’re moving in, unpacking, and organizing your new house, keep your cat in the secure room.
  6. Attempt to maintain as much consistency as possible with the typical eating schedule.

It is possible that your cat will not eat as much as normal immediately following the relocation. Feeding him warm, wet cat food and treats will encourage him to consume more calories. If your cat hasn’t eaten for more than two days, you should consult your veterinarian.

Adjusting to the New Home

Once your cat has finished eating and appears to be in a good mood, you may allow him to begin exploring other parts of the house. Your cat may even appear to be interested in what is happening on the other side of the door. Allow your cat to become familiar with his new surroundings gradually. To make it easier on yourself, introduce one new room at a time and block off areas where you don’t want your cat to go to hide. A terrified cat may flee and seek refuge in a dark place such as a basement or attic.

It takes a varying amount of time for each cat to acclimate.

There are some cats that will insist on going out of their secure space while others who would choose to remain.

Even the most courageous of cats will feel stress when they are relocated to a new home.

Consult your veterinarian for guidance on feline behavior, or seek the services of a feline behaviorist.

Make sure your cat’s identification tag is up to date, and that any microchip registrations have your current contact information.

Once your cat appears to have been acclimated to the interior of your new house, you can introduce your cat to your yard.

Increase the amount of time your cat spends outside gradually until he or she appears comfortable in the environment.

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