How To Tell If A Cat Has A Broken Leg

Does My Cat Have a Broken Leg? Signs & Treatment

Have you ever wondered how a street cat with a broken leg manages not only to survive, but also to appear graceful as it lops across the street in one piece? Perhaps you’ve even had a cat that had broken a limb and marveled at how well they were able to conceal their distress so efficiently. It is because they are so adept at surviving accidents and diseases that even a cat with an untreated broken limb may appear virtually normal, even after suffering this type of damage shortly following the occurrence.

Consequently, even the most serious leg injury does not prevent a cat from hunting and scavenging once it has recovered from an untreated broken leg.

Causes of Limb Fractures in Cats

Cats break (or fracture) their limbs for a variety of reasons. It may seem apparent, but trauma is the most common cause. The following are examples of common forms of trauma:

  • Vehicle trauma: This is likely the most prevalent cause of feline fractures
  • However, it is not the only one. A prominent cause of fractured extremities is bite injuries
  • Dog attacks, in particular, are common. Injuries caused by bullets, arrows, slingshots, or pellet guns: Projectiles have the potential to easily shatter limbs. A condition known as high-rise syndrome occurs when cats fall from great heights, most commonly from balconies and roofs, causing severe injury or death. Fractures of the limbs are often (though not usually) when people fall from great heights. Fractures caused by household appliances and furniture: There are several equipment and pieces of furniture that might cause fractures. Particularly dangerous are reclining chairs, which are a typical source of limb fractures in cats.

Nonetheless, there are other non-traumatic causes for a cat to fracture a leg, including the following:

  • Despite this, there are several non-traumatic causes for a cat to fracture a leg, including the following:

When a cat is diagnosed with a broken limb, it is necessary to explore all of the possible causes and outcomes.

How to Tell if a Cat Has a Broken Leg

Untreated fractured legs in cats are typically accompanied by visible limping and other signs of illness. If the fracture does not make the leg unstable, the limb may occasionally droop while they walk, but some people may be able to bear weight on it if it is not unstable. Cats have a tough time judging their level of discomfort. Stress hormones help to reduce some of this discomfort, and as previously said, cats are masters at concealing their discomfort; this is understandable given that any show of weakness makes cats a target for predators, which is why they are so adept at disguising their discomfort.

A substantial swelling, an unusual angle to the limb, bleeding or discoloration at the location of the injury are all indicators of a traumatic brain injury.

When a cat has a broken leg, it is typical for him to seek refuge in a corner.

It is possible that a generally gregarious cat will display more distant behavior, or even hostile behavior if they are trying to disguise their discomfort or suffering.

DiagnosisTreatment

Broken limbs may appear to be straightforward to diagnose, but it is sometimes necessary to provide anesthesia and obtain an X-ray before a conclusive diagnosis can be made. A skilled veterinarian can typically detect a new fracture, but an untreated broken leg in a cat can mend for several weeks before it is brought to the veterinarian’s attention. Furthermore, some fractures are quite stable and mild in comparison to others. That is why X-rays are usually recommended if it is suspected that a fracture may have occurred.

  • Depending on the degree of the injury and whether the fracture is “open” or “closed,” there are several approaches to treating a cat with a broken leg.
  • Broken limbs can range from basic, “simple” fractures to complex, “comminuted” fractures, depending on their severity.
  • Fractures can also be classified as “displaced” or “nondisplaced.” Simple, nondisplaced fractures may mend effectively with splinting alone, however comminuted, displaced fractures may require surgery to support them (plates, pins, or other hardware may be necessary).
  • Pain treatment is usually recommended unless the fracture has been present for a lengthy period of time and has healed completely.
  • Anti-inflammatory pain drugs and neuromodulating medications (such as gabapentin and amitriptyline) can be used for a longer period of time to provide comfort and help in the healing process.

If your doctor recommends this course of action, don’t be alarmed; cats are really highly robust and quickly adjust to life with a lost limb or limbs. They soon revert to their previous behavior, albeit with a few more restrictions imposed on them.

Home Care for a Cat With a Broken Leg

It may appear that broken limbs are simple to diagnose, but it is often necessary to provide anesthesia and conduct an X-ray before a conclusive diagnosis can be made. A skilled veterinarian can typically detect a new fracture, but an untreated broken limb in a cat can be mending for several weeks before it is discovered by a veterinarian. Some fractures, on the other hand, are extremely stable and modest in size. It’s for this reason that X-rays are usually recommended when fractures are suspected.

  • Depending on the degree of the injury and whether the fracture is “open” or “closed,” there are several different approaches of treating a cat with a broken leg.
  • Broken limbs can range from basic, “simple” fractures to severe, “comminuted” fractures, depending on their severity.
  • Fractures can also be classified as “displaced” or “nondisplaced,” depending on their location.
  • If surgical fixation is necessary, a board-certified veterinary surgeon is frequently the most appropriate choice in this situation.
  • During the short term, pain medicine is usually comprised of anesthetics and opioids, especially if surgery is necessary.
  • Occasionally, in severe circumstances, amputation is the best alternative since it is the least painful and most humanitarian option available.
  • They soon revert to their previous behavior, although with a few more restrictions imposed upon them.

The Role of Nutrition in Limb Fractures

Cats’ bones must be kept in peak condition in order to avoid fractures from occurring. Proper nutrition is essential to this goal. In particular, cats with an imbalance in their calcium and phosphorus consumption are more vulnerable to limb fractures. fractures. Aftercare for individuals with limb fractures necessitates the maintenance of a sensitive nutritional balance.

As a result, it is critical to provide all cats with feline-specific food that is nutritionally balanced. Furthermore, it is critical to note that cats suffering from trauma do not need to be subjected to further stress by having their diet or feeding schedule changed.

Contributor Bio

The Honorable Dr. Patty Khuly The award-winning veterinarian Dr. Patty Khuly is renowned for her independent thinking, ardent pet advocacy, enthusiasm for the veterinary profession, and notably irreverent pet health writing. She is a member of the American Veterinary Medical Association. Dr. K is a product of Wellesley College and the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine, where she graduated with honors. The acclaimed VMD/MBA dual-degree program at The Wharton School of Business provided her with the opportunity to get her MBA.

But that’s not all there is to it.

K is a geeky reader, an active knitter, a devotee of hot yoga, a music geek, a failing runner, and an indefatigable foodie who loves to travel.

You can read her work at DrPattyKhuly.com and sunsetvets.com, and you can find her on Facebook and Twitter.

Does my cat have a broken leg?

Our Memphis veterinarians understand that mishaps may happen to your cat, whether it is an outdoor feline or an indoor companion. Therefore, it is critical to be aware of the signs and symptoms to check for if you suspect your cat may have a broken or fractured limb.

Accidents Happen

Our Memphis veterinarians understand that mishaps can happen to your cat, whether it is an outdoor cat or an indoor companion. Therefore, it is critical to be aware of the signs and symptoms to check for if you suspect your cat has a broken or fractured limb.

What is the difference between a sprain and a break?

The symptoms of a sprained leg and those of a broken leg are similar, but the difference between the two is that the sprain is caused by a strained ligament or tendon and the break is caused by an injury to the bone. Sprains and leg breaks may both be caused by a variety of events, ranging from vehicle accidents to slip and fall mishaps.

Common Symptoms of a Broken or Fractured Leg

Your cat may be suffering from a fractured limb or other internal injuries if she exhibits any of the symptoms mentioned below. She should be taken to the veterinarian immediately if she exhibits any of these symptoms.

  • Refusal to bear weight on the affected limb
  • Wincing
  • Hissing or biting at you
  • Wailing or shrieking.
  • Refusal to place any weight on the affected limb. Whining or screaming
  • Wincing
  • Hissing or biting at you

If you have reason to believe that your cat has a broken limb, it is critical that you take your pet to the veterinarian as soon as possible. The agony of a broken or fractured bone can be excruciating. Cats are known to be stoic creatures, but it is crucial to have your veterinarian identify the condition and administer medicine to your cat in order to reduce discomfort.

What To Do if You Think Your Cat Has a Broken Leg

If you suspect that your cat may be suffering from a fractured limb, it is imperative that you intervene quickly. Try to keep your cat as motionless as possible, and keep her warm by covering her in a towel or a blanket while you are working. Call your local emergency veterinarian clinic to inform them of what has occurred and that your cat requires immediate veterinary assistance..

Maintain your composure and follow any advice provided to you by the veterinary specialist on the other end of the phone. Then get your wounded cat to an emergency animal center as soon as possible and as securely as you can.

Treating a Broken Leg

When you arrive at your veterinarian’s office, your veterinarian will initiate emergency care, which may involve intravenous fluids, pain medication, and/or ventilation, among other things. Following the stabilization and comfort of your cat, the veterinarian will explain the many treatment choices accessible to you and advise you on which therapy will be the most beneficial for your pet. Your veterinarian may offer non-surgical therapies for your cat’s broken limb, such as cage rest, casts, or a splint, to aid in the healing process, but in many situations, surgery will be necessary.

If your cat is required to spend the night in the emergency clinic, be sure to inquire about visiting hours and when you will receive an update from the veterinarian.

At-Home Care for Your Cat

When you get home, your veterinarian will provide you with specific instructions on how to care for your cat. It’s likely that you’ll have to put some restrictions on your cat’s behavior. Preventing your cat from jumping and running is critical to ensuring that the injury heals as fast as possible after being sustained. Keep your cat in a warm place where she won’t be tempted to leap on furniture or other objects. Alternatively, you might try getting a cage that will allow your cat to wander about freely while still preventing her from leaping.

First Aid for Limping Cats

When you return home, your veterinarian will provide you with extensive instructions on how to care for your cat at home. Your cat’s activities are most likely to be restricted as a result of this. The ability to prevent your cat from jumping and fleeing is critical to ensuring that the injury heals as rapidly as possible. Keep your cat in a warm place where she won’t be tempted to leap on furniture or other obstacles. Alternatives include getting a cage that will allow your cat to move freely but will prevent her from jumping out of the cage.

What Causes Lameness?

Lameness is caused by an injury or debilitation of one or more elements of the leg, including the joints, bones, muscles, nerves, tendons, ligaments, or skin. Lameness is a condition that affects the lower extremities. Some limps may be traced back to a specific reason. When a bone or joint is shattered or dislocated, there may be swelling and the leg may be positioned at an unnatural angle. It is possible to get crusty, malformed nails as a result of nail bed infections.

Deeper infections, such as abscesses, will manifest themselves as warm, soft, fluctuant swellings beneath the surface of the skin. In other situations, such as those affecting joints, nerves, tendons, and ligaments, there may be no visible signs of injury on the outside.

How Serious is a Limp?

Because certain limps are more significant than others, the first step in delivering first aid is to determine the severity of the injury. Keep an eye on your cat’s every move. Determine which leg is limping: the right or left, the front or the back? Are there any times when your cat walks with one leg and balances on the other when standing still? Is she able to walk on it, yet she stumbles a little? Take fewer steps than you normally would? Is she able to prevent her foot from hitting the ground when walking?

When did you first discover that you were walking with a limp?

Was there a traumatic event that occurred?

Should You Examine the Leg?

If your cat is in excruciating pain, do not attempt to inspect or treat her yourself. Broken bones or dislocated joints should not be handled unless she appears to be in apparent agony. Doing so can create unneeded suffering and may even aggravate the condition. In order to assist you estimate the severity of your injury, here’s a simple rule of thumb to follow: Unless it is a broken leg or dislocated joint, most cats will not walk on it. “Most cats will not walk on it unless it is a broken leg or dislocated joint.” A proper exam necessitates the participation of two people: one to inspect the leg and another to control the cat.

  1. Avoid continuing if the test is becoming too painful.
  2. “After you’ve determined which leg is hurting, it’s time to determine where the pain is coming from.
  3. Keep an eye out for strange objects between the toes (thorns, splinters, grass awns).
  4. Gentle pressure should be applied to each toe, with sore regions being noted.
  5. Start at the ankle and work your way up the limb, detecting regions of sensitivity by applying light pressure to different parts of the leg.
  6. Joints that bend and flex.
  7. Whether something appears or feels weird, compare it to the other leg to see if it is related.
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What Are Appropriate First Aid Measures for Non-Emergency Limps?

  1. You should remove any foreign body that you see between your toes and clean the wound with anti-bacterial soap if you can reach it readily. To alleviate swelling, soak the foot in warm Epsom salts water. After that, apply an antibiotic ointment. 2.Control the bleeding and treat as instructed in the articlesFirst Aid for Torn Foot Pads andFirst Aid for Broken Nails for cut or torn foot pads and broken nails. The First Aid Treatment for Broken Nails
  2. If your cat is experiencing swelling as a result of a sprain, bruising, or tendinitis, administer ice packs to the affected region for 15 minutes twice a day. Flowing water helps to enhance circulation, minimize edema, and speed up the healing process. If your cat is willing to accept it, immerse her in a tub of water and swirl the water over her leg. Warm compresses applied to the afflicted area or soaking in warm Epsom salts bath are effective treatments for abscesses. The cat should be sent immediately to a veterinarian for treatment, which will include wound cleaning and antibiotics. 5.Confine and restrict the activities of lame cats.

You should remove it and disinfect the wound with anti-bacterial soap if you see a foreign thing between your toes and can reach it. To alleviate swelling, soak the foot in warm Epsom salts water.. After that, apply an antibiotic ointment to the wound. 2.Control the bleeding and treat the cut or torn foot pads and broken nails as detailed in the articlesFirst Aid for Torn Foot Pads andFirst Aid for Broken Nails. 3. Nail Breakage: First Aid Treatment; Ice packs should be applied to the affected region for 15 minutes twice daily if the cat is suffering from swelling caused by a sprain, bruising, or tendonitis, according to the manufacturer.

You can put your cat in a tub and swirl water over her leg if she is willing to do so.

The cat should be sent immediately to a veterinarian for treatment, which will include wound cleaning and antibiotics; 5: Confine and restrict the activities of lame cats.

How Should You Transport a Limping Cat?

Moving an injured cat might exacerbate the condition of the animal, so proceed with caution. Place the cat in a pet carrier, with the head and hips supported, and secure the carrier. Remove the top of the carrier if it has one, and gently lower the cat into the carrier while holding the carrier. Lay the cat lie on its back with the damaged limb up. Leave your cat in its carrier until a technician or a veterinarian can help you when you arrive at the veterinary facility.

What Can Veterinarians do to Help Lame Cats?

Medical developments have made it possible to provide better treatment for lame cats. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to reduce pain and inflammation in acute injuries and are also used long-term in cats with chronic arthritis to treat the condition. There are additional medications that can help to promote joint health while also providing safe pain relief. “If you offer first aid when necessary and seek early veterinarian treatment when necessary, your cat will have a greater chance of recuperating.” There are surgical and non-surgical treatment options available for traumatic fractures.

With the use of bandages or slings, dislocated joints can be replaced and stabilized.

In short, there are a variety of solutions for assisting a limping cat.

Despite the fact that your cat has four legs, she requires that all of them be in excellent shape.

What to Do When Your Cat Has a Broken Bone

Cats are naturally nimble and flexible, but it doesn’t rule out the possibility of fractures or breaks when their bones are under strain. Cats often suffer fractured leg bones more commonly than other bones in their bodies, however any bone in their body might shatter if the force is applied. It is essential that you understand how to recognize and treat a fractured bone in your cat, as well as how to respond in order to make your cat comfortable while doing so. After taking your cat to the veterinary facility for treatment, you’ll need to know how to care for him until the bone has healed completely.

Cats are independent creatures who have a high pain tolerance, which makes them excellent pets.

However, there are various indications that will suggest the presence of a fracture that you may search for:

  • Changes in walking style. It’s possible that your cat will avoid placing weight on one limb. This might indicate that the leg has been fractured or that another bone in the area is causing discomfort when walking on that section of the body. Movement has been restricted. Cats are known for having remarkable mobility. When they groom themselves, they curl up to make it easier to leap, and they extend out to sharpen their claws. If your cat has a fractured bone, these motions would be either impossible or extremely painful. In case you notice that your cat is hesitant to move, you might want to look into it more. Changes in the course of one’s normal activities. Your cat’s behavior will follow patterns that you are already familiar with. If, for example, your cat has always had a strong appetite but is now refusing to eat, you must determine why this is happening. The presence of a fractured jaw may hinder your cat from desiring to eat food
  • Vocalization. Some cats may suffer in silence, whilst others will meow more frequently, or they may groan or scream out in pain. Aside from that, some cats may seek refuge in order to prevent additional interaction that might cause harm. Swelling. Inflammation is caused by broken bones. If you see any swelling on the legs, torso, or tail (tails can break as well), take your dog to the veterinarian right away.

Gestural alterations It’s possible that your cat will avoid placing weight on a single limb altogether. This might indicate that the leg has been fractured or that another bone in the area is causing discomfort when walking on that section of the body; Movement is restricted. When it comes to movement, cats are generally quite good. When they groom themselves, they curl up to make it easier to jump and stretch out to sharpen their claws. If your cat has a fractured bone, these motions would either be impossible or extremely painful.

Suppose your cat has always had a strong appetite but has suddenly stopped eating; you’ll need to figure out why.

Vocalization.

Aside from that, some cats may seek refuge in order to prevent additional interaction that may cause harm.

Inflammation results from broken bones. Please take your dog to the veterinarian if you see any swelling on his legs, torso, or tail (tails can break too).

  • Providing pain medicine and other drugs to the patient. Pain medication will be administered to your cat in order to keep them comfortable in the days after treatment. They may also be taking antibiotics or anti-inflammatory drugs to keep an infection or swelling from developing, especially if they have just undergone surgery. Maintaining your cat’s stillness. Preventing your cat from wandering around too much is the most challenging aspect of home care. Soon, they may begin to feel better and express a desire to run and leap. These behaviors have the potential to re-injure your cat. Remove cat trees and toys that will encourage your cat to move around too much. Taking good care of bandages and incisions. There will be wounds on your cat if they have a complicated fracture that has broken the skin or if they have undergone surgery. It is important to keep bandages dry and clean. Attending follow-up visits and avoiding allowing your cat to gnaw on them or scratch at them are important considerations. Finally, book an appointment with your veterinarian for follow-up treatment. Your veterinarian will do more x-rays to ensure that the bone has healed appropriately.

It might be difficult to provide care for a cat that has a fractured bone. If you have any questions concerning cat care, please feel free to contact us at South Seattle Veterinary Hospital.

Simple Fractures in Cats – Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, Treatment, Recovery, Management, Cost

Simple fractures are often found in cats since they are typically the consequence of low-grade trauma such as falls or being accidentally trodden on, which are both situations that occur regularly in cats’ lives. Fractures of the leg, pelvis, and tail are the most common types of fractures found in cats as a consequence of accidents and falls. In young, energetic cats that are still developing and learning their limitations (they may tumble trying to jump a distance they are not yet capable of safely covering) and whose bones haven’t fully grown, simple fractures are more common than more complicated fractures.

  • Consult your veterinarian as soon as you feel your cat may have fractured a bone in order to avoid further complications.
  • An undisplaced break in a bone is referred to as a simple fracture since there is no displacement of the bone pieces.
  • In other words, the bone should not be shattered in more than one location on the body.
  • Make a plan ahead of time.
  • Plans should be compared.
  • The average cost is $700.

Symptoms of Simple Fractures in Cats

The most common type of fracture found in cats is a simple fracture, which is usually the consequence of low-grade trauma such as falls or being accidentally trodden on, both of which are common occurrences in cats’ lives. Fractures of the leg, pelvis, and tail are the most common types of fractures found in cats as a consequence of accidents or falls. In young, energetic cats that are still developing and learning their limitations (they may tumble trying to jump a distance they are not yet capable of safely covering) and whose bones haven’t fully grown, simple fractures are more common than more complex fractures.

Consult your veterinarian as soon as you feel your cat may have fractured a bone in order to avoid further injury.

An undisplaced break in a bone is referred to as a simple fracture since the bone pieces do not move from their original position.

Therefore, the bone should not be shattered more than once over the course of the fracture.

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  • Impossibility of bearing weight on the afflicted limb(s). An irregular gait as a result of lameness
  • Swelling at the site of the fracture
  • Pain reaction (the cat may express distress vocally)
  • Breathing that is rapid and perhaps shock

Lameness arises when a fractured bone is unable to withstand the usual compression (the effect of gravity on the bone while bearing weight) and traction (the tugging on the bone from the muscle connection) that are necessary for normal movement and weight bearing after the break. Top

Causes of Simple Fractures in Cats

In the case of a fractured bone, lameness develops because it is unable to endure the usual compression (effect of gravity on bone while bearing weight) and traction (pushing on bone from muscle attachment) that are essential for normal movement and weight carrying. Top

  • Falls, abuse, household mishaps, and motor vehicle accidents are all possibilities.

Fractures can develop even with low stress and routine use in rare cases, due to weakness caused by malignant tumors existing in the bone or a metabolic disease that causes calcium to be leached from bones. Other causes that might cause a cat to suffer from shattered bones are as follows:

  • Malnourished cats with weak bones
  • Young cats with still growing bones
  • Old cats with brittle bones
  • Young cats with still developing bones Obese cats that are putting additional stress on their bones

As a result of the intrinsic structural fragility of long bones, hairline fractures are more likely to develop around the center of long bones, where the leverage exerted has the greatest possibility of causing harm. Top

Diagnosis of Simple Fractures in Cats

Your veterinarian will perform a thorough physical examination to establish the source of the discomfort and swelling, as well as whether or not there is lameness. They will also want a thorough history, which will include the cat’s age as well as any medical issues that may have led to the straightforward fracture. If the occurrence that caused the break is not known, any odd behaviors or situations that your pet may have been engaged in should be mentioned to your veterinarian as soon as possible.

When it comes to taking precise x rays, it may be essential to sedate your pet in order to immobilize them.

X-rays will be examined by your veterinarian to look for evidence of a simple fracture and to establish the precise location, nature, and severity of the fracture.

Testing to detect the existence of cancer or a metabolic condition may be conducted in the case of a cancerous history or symptoms, or in the case of a metabolic illness that may be a contributing cause to the fracture.

Treatment of Simple Fractures in Cats

To discover the source of the discomfort and swelling, as well as the existence of lameness, your veterinarian will do a thorough physical examination on your pet. Also required is a thorough history, which includes the cat’s age as well as any medical issues that may have had a role in resulting in the simple fracture. If the occurrence that caused the break is not known, any odd behaviors or situations in which your pet may have been engaged should be reported to your veterinarian. An x-ray of the damaged region will be requested by your veterinarian.

It may be necessary to obtain X-rays of both the damaged and unharmed sides of your cat to compare the two.

Incomplete fractures are those in which the bone is only partially broken, as opposed to full fractures, which occur when the break extends all the way through the bone and is complete.

Testing to detect the existence of cancer or a metabolic condition may be conducted in the case of a cancerous history or symptoms, or if a metabolic illness is suspected of being a contributory cause to the fracture. Top

Recovery of Simple Fractures in Cats

Cats with minor fractures are often discharged from the hospital after being treated. Your cat should be kept calm and its activity should be maintained to a minimum. Pain relievers and sedatives may be used as directed by your veterinarian. To keep your cat’s fracture from worsening, a cast or splint may have been used to immobilize the fracture. You will need to make sure that the cast is kept clean and dry and may need to be replaced if necessary. In addition, it is critical to monitor the cast for symptoms of swelling or chafing, which might signal that the cast is either too tight or too loose on the patient.

  • Once the fracture has been repaired, you will need to schedule a follow-up appointment with your veterinarian to have the sutures and staples removed.
  • After your cat has healed, it may be necessary to take further x-rays to confirm proper healing.
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How to Treat a Cat That has a Broken Leg

Cats with minor fractures are often discharged from the hospital after receiving treatment. Quietness and activity should be maintained in your cat. As directed by your veterinarian, pain relievers and sedatives may be used. To keep your cat’s fracture from worsening, a cast or splint may have been used to immobilize the fracture. You will need to make sure that the cast is kept clean and dry at all times, and it may need to be changed sometimes. Additionally, it is critical to monitor the cast for symptoms of swelling or chafing, which might signal that the cast is either too tight or too loose on the patient.

  • Once the fracture has been repaired, you will need to schedule a follow-up appointment with your veterinarian to have any sutures or staples removed.
  • Your cat’s recovery may necessitate the taking of further x-rays to guarantee proper healing.
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How to Treat Fractures in Cats: 11 Steps (with Pictures)

Fractures occur when an inordinate amount of force is applied to a bone, causing it to split or fracture. Fractures in pets are most often caused by something traumatic, such as a fall, an animal assault, or being struck by a car. The femur (thigh bone), pelvis, jaw, and tail are the bones in cats that are most susceptible to breaking.

A fracture must be treated by a veterinarian as soon as possible in order to enhance the chances of a full recovery. If your cat suffers a fracture, don’t wait to get her the medical attention she requires right away.

  1. 1 Keep an eye on your cat as it walks. Fractures in your cat’s leg might impair his ability to walk. In the case of a fractured leg bone, she may choose to lift the afflicted leg into the air and hop around on the other legs to avoid further injury. For those who can put weight on the wounded leg, she may be able to hobble along with it. It is likely that your cat will be unable to walk at all if she has fractures in numerous legs.
  • Observe your cat’s every movement. Cats who have fractures may have difficulty walking. Suppose she has shattered one of her leg bones. She may choose to bounce around on her other legs, while holding the wounded leg up in the air. For those who can put weight on the wounded leg, she may be able to hobble about without assistance. It is likely that your cat will be unable to walk at all if she has fractures in numerous legs.
  • 1 Keep an eye on your cat’s every move. Fractures might impair your cat’s ability to move around. In the case of a shattered leg bone, she may choose to lift the afflicted leg into the air and hop around on the remaining legs. For those who can put weight on the wounded leg, she may be able to hobble along. It is likely that your cat will be unable to walk at all if she has fractures in several of her legs.
  • 1 Keep an eye on your cat while it walks. Fractures might impair your cat’s ability to walk. For example, if she has shattered a leg bone, she may lift the afflicted leg up in the air and hop around on the remaining legs. Alternatively, if she is able to bear weight on the wounded leg, she may walk with a limp. If your cat suffers fractures in numerous legs, she will most likely be unable to walk at all.
  • 3 Provide first assistance to the injured party. When your cat suffers a fracture, she will require emergency medical attention from your veterinarian. If you are unable to bring her to your veterinarian immediately away, you can conduct a few first aid steps at home to help stabilize her condition until you can. A clean cloth or sterile gauze should be placed over the area if it is bleeding or if the broken bone is poking through the skin.
  • Gauze that has been sterilized is available at your local pharmacy. The bleeding does not have to be stopped entirely if there is any bleeding
  • It is not recommended to attempt to relocate the broken bone. It is possible that doing so will aggravate your cat’s ailment. In the event that you are unclear of what you can do for your cat, consult your veterinarian first. Do not administer pain meds to your cat unless your veterinarian has instructed you to do so.
  • 4 Take your cat to the veterinarian. Wrapping your cat in a big towel and transporting her to the veterinarian can help to keep her as motionless as possible. Your veterinarian will undertake a physical assessment as well as an examination of the fracture. X-rays will assist your veterinarian in determining the kind and severity of the fracture.
  • Detailed information about your cat’s injuries, including how and when it occurred, as well as any first aid you administered, should be sent to your veterinarian. Your cat’s fracture may not be her only injury
  • She may also be suffering from internal injuries (e.g., internal hemorrhage, organ damage) as well as exterior injuries (e.g., cuts, bruises). The physical exam and imaging tests (x-ray, ultrasound) performed by your veterinarian would be used to determine whether there are any further injuries. Depending on the severity of your cat’s injuries, your veterinarian may decide to examine the fractured region first before evaluating the other injuries.
  1. 1Priority should be given to life-threatening injuries. If your cat’s life is in imminent danger as a result of her injuries, your veterinarian will administer vigorous and rapid therapy to stabilize her before addressing the broken bone. Intravenous fluids, ventilation, and pain medication are all available as emergency therapy. Once your cat has regained his or her stability, your veterinarian will design a treatment plan for the fracture. 2 Examine the various treatment possibilities for the fracture. Cat fractures can be treated surgically or non-surgically, depending on the severity of the injury. Some fractures may be treated non-surgically using splints, casts, or cage rest
  2. However, some fractures may necessitate the implantation of implants through surgery (e.g., screws, pins). The sort of therapy your cat requires will be determined by a number of criteria, including her age, overall health, and the form of the fracture (which bones have been fractured and what type of fracture it is).
  • Take the initiative in asking questions about treatment alternatives and deciding on the most appropriate treatment strategy for your feline companion. The fact that you are actively participating in the decision-making process may assist to enhance the outcome of your cat’s therapy.
  • 3 Allow your veterinarian to do the necessary repairs on your cat’s fracture. When you and your veterinarian have agreed on a treatment plan, defer to your veterinarian’s judgment and enable him or her to carry out the required procedures to treat the fracture. Fracture surgery is often the most effective treatment option in many circumstances. If your fracture is complicated, your veterinarian may recommend that you see a veterinary surgeon.
  • If your cat is required to be hospitalized for fracture treatment, inquire with your veterinarian about the possibility of visiting your cat. Spending quality time with her and conversing with her will help to alleviate her worry and tension as a result of being admitted to the hospital. Occasionally, a fracture is so serious that it is not possible to fix it. Depending on the severity of your cat’s fracture, your veterinarian may recommend amputation, particularly if the tail is shattered.
  1. 1 Limit your cat’s ability to move about. It is preferable for fractures to heal if the afflicted bone is kept calm and undisturbed. In the days after veterinarian treatment, you will need to keep your cat as motionless as possible at home—no running or leaping allowed! If she normally roams freely around your home, you might want to try confining her to a smaller area when you are unable to monitor her
  • Make every effort to keep your cat in an area without any furniture or countertops from which she may jump.. If this is not an option, consider utilizing a tall plastic fence to keep her contained within a bigger space
  • Otherwise, It is possible that she has a jaw fracture, in which case you will have to feed her by hand and offer her soft things so that she does not have to use her jaw too much. There is no particular period of time during which you should restrict your cat’s activities. Your veterinarian can advise you on when your cat will be able to resume her regular level of activity.
  • 2 Administer medicine to your cat. Even if she attempts to disguise it, your cat is most certainly in a great deal of discomfort. Your cat’s pain medication will be prescribed by your veterinarian. If the shattered bone was able to enter the skin, it is possible that the damaged region became infected. In that situation, your veterinarian would prescribe an antibiotic as well.
  • Make sure you follow all medication directions to the letter. If you are confused about how to provide drugs to your cat, ask your veterinarian to show how to do so.
  • 3 Replace the bandages on your cat’s paws. If your veterinarian has wrapped the broken region, you may need to replace the bandages if they become wet or unclean. If your veterinarian has not bandaged the fractured area, you may not need to replace the bandages. The presence of urine is a typical cause of bandages becoming moist. If you visit your veterinarian, he or she can show you how to properly remove the old bandages, clean the damaged area (if required), and apply fresh bandages.
  • When bandaging, it is critical not to wrap the bandages excessively tightly, since this will prevent circulation from reaching the injured region, causing recovery to be delayed. As an added bonus, your cat would be really uncomfortable. The bandaging material you need may be found at your local pharmacy. Your veterinarian can advise you on which supplies to purchase. In the event that you feel uncomfortable changing your cat’s bandages, you can have your veterinarian do so for you.
  • 4 Schedule a follow-up visit with your veterinarian for your cat. Following fracture treatment, a follow-up session with your veterinarian will be required in order to check your cat’s progression. For example, your veterinarian may recommend that you have x-rays taken to see how well the bone has mended. Bones typically recover entirely between 4 and 6 weeks, so your follow-up session will most likely be approximately a month following your initial treatment.
  • You should take your cat to the veterinarian before the scheduled follow-up appointment if you observe any redness, swelling, or discharge from the afflicted region. It is possible that the afflicted region is infected and may require extra treatment.

Please take your cat to the veterinarian before the follow-up appointment if you observe any redness, swelling or discharge from the afflicted region. It’s possible that the afflicted region is infected and may require extra treatment.

  • Question How can I repair the fractured limb of my cat at home? Dr. Jamie Freyer is a Licensed Doctor of Veterinary Medicine who practices in the state of Washington, United States. She has more than 10 years of experience in both clinical practice and industry, and she specializes in veterinary medicine and surgery, animal behavior, and animal genetics, among other areas of expertise. Dr. Freyer received his bachelor’s degree in life science from The University of Portland and his doctorate in veterinary medicine from Oregon State University. Certified Veterinary Technician’s Answer You should avoid treating your cat’s broken leg at home because, even if you have the best of intentions, you may end up making the situation worse. As an alternative, let it alone, maintain your cat in the best of health, and take them to the vet
  • What should you do if your cat has a broken leg? A veterinarian with over 30 years of expertise in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice, Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS, is a member of the British Veterinary Medical Association. Veterinary medicine and surgery were among the subjects she studied when she graduated with honors from the University of Glasgow in 1987. She has been employed at the same animal clinic in her hometown for more than two decades now. An Answer from a Veterinarian A veterinarian must evaluate the fracture in order to determine the best course of action. This can range from a hard support dressing to an internal fixation with a pin or an external fixator, as well as a combination of these. The importance of rest and pain alleviation cannot be overstated. Question How long does it take for a cat fracture to heal? A veterinarian with over 30 years of expertise in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice, Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS, is a member of the British Veterinary Medical Association. Veterinary medicine and surgery were among the subjects she studied when she graduated with honors from the University of Glasgow in 1987. She has been employed at the same animal clinic in her hometown for more than two decades now. An Answer from a Veterinarian The speed with which a fracture heals is dependent on a variety of factors, including how effectively the fracture has been stabilized, the age of the cat, and the intricacy of the break. A young cat with a simple break that is well-supported will live for around six weeks in the best case scenario. It is fairly uncommon for a complicated fracture, particularly in an elderly animal, to need at least three months of healing time. Question What is the best way to know whether a cat has a fractured bone? A veterinarian with over 30 years of expertise in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice, Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS, is a member of the British Veterinary Medical Association. Veterinary medicine and surgery were among the subjects she studied when she graduated with honors from the University of Glasgow in 1987. She has been employed at the same animal clinic in her hometown for more than two decades now. An Answer from a Veterinarian Due to the discomfort of shattered bones, a kitten with a broken leg is likely to limp or refuse to use the limb. This is a sign if the leg is bent at an unusual angle
  • However, not all fractures are as visible as this. A limping cat is in distress, and the only choice is to get them examined by a veterinarian to determine the source of the discomfort—whether it be a sprain, bite, or fracture. Question Is it possible for a cat to mend a broken limb on its own? A veterinarian with over 30 years of expertise in veterinary surgery and companion animal practice, Dr. Elliott, BVMS, MRCVS, is a member of the British Veterinary Medical Association. Veterinary medicine and surgery were among the subjects she studied when she graduated with honors from the University of Glasgow in 1987. She has been employed at the same animal clinic in her hometown for more than two decades now. An Answer from a Veterinarian As a cat has a fractured bone, the difficulty is that when the cat moves, it pushes the fracture pieces further apart. Optimally, the bone will repair bent, and worst case scenario, continual movement will prevent the bone from healing completely. All shattered bones must be evaluated by a veterinarian, who will determine the most effective method of reattaching the bones.
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  • Cat fractures have a good prognosis for recovery. Following treatment, it is likely that your cat will be able to use the affected region to its full capacity. In contrast to external implants, such as screws and pins, internal implants do not require removal. Keep a watchful check on your cat to avoid any further fractures from occurring. If she has a penchant for jumping from great heights, avoid situations where she might do so. Fill the locations where you don’t want her to go with orange rinds or cotton balls drenched in scent, and place them in plain sight. If your cat has a fractured jaw, it may appear to be in a poor way to you. To one’s advantage, a jaw fracture typically has a favorable to outstanding prognosis.
  • Tail fractures can be difficult to detect in some cases. You may notice indicators of nerve injury (urinary or fecal incontinence) as a result of the tail fracture, which is common. Your veterinarian would be able to ascertain what is causing the incontinence in your pet. Infection and poor bone healing are potential concerns associated with surgical fracture repairs. Pets, on the other hand, have a very good recovery rate following surgery. Your veterinarian will explain the dangers associated with surgical procedures with you. In certain cases, vertebral fractures (fractures of the spine’s bones) can result in injury to the spinal cord. When the spinal cord is injured, the prognosis is typically guarded to poor
  • However, in some cases, the prognosis is excellent.

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Summary of the ArticleXIf you have reason to believe that your cat has suffered a fracture, keep an eye out for a few tell-tale indicators, such as difficulties walking, eating, or lifting its tail. If your cat looks to have a fracture, you should immediately contact your veterinarian since this is the most effective strategy to ensure that it heals properly. A splint or cast may be applied by your veterinarian, and cage rest may be recommended depending on how severe the fracture is. In more severe situations, your veterinarian may need to undertake surgical implantation of screws or pins to stabilize the joint.

This is the most effective method of ensuring that your cat will make a complete recovery.

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Despite the fact that cats are famed for their elegance and agility, even the most spirited feline can suffer a fractured limb as a result of an accident, an injury, or even a tumble. It is important to recognize the signs of a cat broken limb and get urgent veterinarian care. This will assist to prevent your cat from infection and enhance the likelihood of your cat making a full recovery. Image courtesy of krblokhin/iStock/GettyImages.com A cat who has a broken leg will be in discomfort and may want to hide from you.

  • If you attempt to touch her leg or inspect her, your cat may grimace, bite, or hissat you, depending on how she feels.
  • Other signs of a cat broken leg include a noticeable deformity, bruising or swelling, and an unwillingness to bear weight on the fractured limb, amongst other things.
  • Sprains are caused by a strained ligament or tendon, and they are often less serious than breaks, but many of the symptoms are the same in both cases.
  • If your cat is acting strangely or looks to be in discomfort, you should take him or her to the veterinarian.
  • Your cat may be suffering from internal ailments that are not immediately obvious but require immediate attention.
  • Photo courtesy of Molly Aaker/Moment/Getty Images.
  • If you see a bone poking through the skin, wrap it with gauze to prevent infection and take your kitten to the veterinarian as soon as possible to have it treated.

Through a physical examination, your veterinarian may be able to identify your cat’s injuries; nevertheless, anesthesia and radiographic imaging are likely to be required.

Splinting or casting the leg in the event of a simple break can help to support the limb while it heals.

Your cat’s physical activity will need to be restricted while she is recovering from her illness or injury.

Lopez/Moment/Getty Images is credited with this image.

If you have a cat who is really active or who lives outside, this might be challenging.

Dressings will need to be kept clean and dry, and they may need to be changed on a frequent basis. In order to guarantee a thorough recovery, follow your veterinarian’s recommendations for aftercare and physical therapy.

How to Tell If A Cat Has a Broken Leg?

Despite the fact that cats are fluffy bundles of energy, the daring side of them can occasionally result in an unanticipated mishap, such as breaking a limb. They usually break their legs when they land, fight with other cats, have an accident, or are assaulted by a callous someone who takes advantage of them. A broken limb is no minor matter, but by administering basic feline first-aid and early veterinarian attention, you can avoid the worst-case scenario that could occur.

How to tell if a cat has a broken leg

There are two types of fractures: closed fractures and open fractures. A closed or simple fracture is one in which the bones remain intact within the surrounding tissue or skin. The difference between the two is that an open fracture has the bone poking out through the skin and requires emergency veterinarian attention. When determining whether a cat has a fractured limb, check for the following signs in the cat:

  • Walking with a limp or in an unusual manner
  • Because she is unwilling to put any weight on her damaged leg, she is walking in an improper manner. When you touch the afflicted region, you will see a bruise or swelling. Incapable of running or jumping. She may even refuse to move and choose to remain hidden
  • This is possible. When you attempt to check the fractured limb, the patient displays signals of aggressiveness toward you. The absence of grooming as well as a decline in appetite Due to the shock, there is unusually fast breathing. Anxiety, discomfort, and overall symptoms of distress (crying, howling, snarling)

What to do if you suspect that your cat has a broken leg

First and foremost, you must do a thorough examination for the signs and symptoms indicated above while taking care not to be clawed or bitten yourself. Petting the cat’s head or soothing her in a calm voice will help to decrease the discomfort she is experiencing while also providing her with comfort. Provide her with nutritious food and clean water (if she takes them), since she will require a large amount of nutrients to complete the healing process. After administering first aid, contact your local veterinarian or an emergency animal clinic to let them know you are on your way and to describe the nature of the incident.

The wounded cat will be sedated by the veterinarian, who will then conduct a physical examination with the use of X-rays.

Why Is My Cat Limping?

First and foremost, you must do a thorough inspection for the signs and symptoms listed above while taking care not to be clawed or bitten by the creature. Try to soothe the cat to decrease the discomfort she is experiencing while also providing her with comfort by caressing her head or soothing her in a kind manner. She will require a large amount of nutrients for the healing process, so provide her with food and clean water (if she takes them). Contact your local veterinarian or an emergency animal clinic to let them know you’re on your way and to give them a brief explanation of what’s going on.

The wounded cat will be sedated and examined by the veterinarian, who will use X-rays to confirm the diagnosis.

Common Causes of Limping in Cats

  • Fights with other cats or wildlife can result in a broken claw
  • Thorns, cactus needles, broken glass, or other foreign items lodged in the paw
  • And other injuries. a paw pad that has been damaged or sliced
  • The presence of a foreign item between the toes or in the paw pad
  • Tendonitis
  • A sprain of the leg
  • A joint that has dislocated
  • A fractured tibia
  • Arthritis, hip dysplasia, patellar luxation, and other conditions Disease of the lumbosacral region
  • Inflammation of the intervertebral disks
  • Tumors, which may be benign or malignant in nature
  • Cancers such as lung-digit syndrome, injection site sarcoma, and lymphoma are examples of such diseases.

Once you’ve figured out what’s causing your cat’s limping, you could find yourself with a few more questions.

How long do you think it will take them to recover? What can I do to make sure they don’t get hurt again in the future? You may rest confident that we have your back.

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It is possible for your cat to suddenly start limping for a variety of causes. Injuries to the paw, such as a torn pad or implanted item, as well as a broken claw, may result in limping. Limping can be caused by a serious injury such as tendinitis, a sprain, a dislocated joint, or a fractured bone in the leg. Limping can also be caused by chronic illnesses such as arthritis, hip dysplasia, patellar luxation, lumbosacral disease, intervertebral disk disease, or cancer. Arthritis is the most common cause of limping.

What should I do if my cat is limping?

If your cat is limping and appears to be in severe discomfort, take them to the veterinarian as soon as possible. If your cat is limping but will allow you to touch and inspect the limb, look for any symptoms of damage starting with the paw and working your way up the leg to the knee and beyond. If there is a little foreign item trapped between the toes or in the pad of the foot, such as a thorn or a piece of broken glass, remove it and clean the wound. If the pad is ripped or sliced, apply pressure to the wound and clean it thoroughly.

How can you tell if your cat has a broken leg?

The only way to know for certain whether or not your cat has a fractured limb is to take them to the veterinarian for an x-ray. Many of the symptoms of a hairline fracture are the same as those of a sprained leg, but they require a different therapeutic approach. However, with proper medical care, your cat will be able to return to his or her normal activities within three to four months of suffering a fractured limb.

How can you prevent your cat from injuring their leg?

You can only know if your cat has a broken limb by having them x-rayed by a veterinarian. There is no other way to tell. Many of the symptoms of a hairline fracture are the same as those of a sprained leg, but they require a different course of action. The loss of a limb is a devastating accident, but with the proper medical care, your cat should be able to return to their normal activities within three to four months.

How long will a cat limp with a sprain?

Sprains are often considered to be less dangerous than a fractured bone, but they are nonetheless significant injuries that require time to recover from. Depending on the severity of the injury, recovery might take several weeks. A cat with a sprained leg should always be taken to the veterinarian. Splinting is required for severe sprains, and in certain circumstances, surgery is required. In order to aid in your cat’s healing, keep them calm and restricted to a limited space in order to prevent exacerbating the injury.

Never hesitate to take your cat to the veterinarian if you are unsure.

Further Reading:

  • Choosing Between Indoor and Outdoor Cats: What You Should Know Before Making a Decision
  • A Guide to Dealing with Anxiety in Your Cat 9 Warning Signs that Your Cat Is Dissatisfied The following are 11 strange cat behaviors that every cat lover has witnessed: The Most Reliable Pet Insurance in 2021

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