How To Travel With A Cat On A Plane

How to Travel with a Cat on a Plane

Traveling with a cat by airline might make you feel a bit uneasy, so prepare yourself for that feeling. What measures do you take to keep your adorable little furball safe? Is he going to be scared? Do you bring him along with you to the cabin? When traveling with a cat, there is a lot to think about and plan for beforehand. Providing you prepare ahead of time, pack travel necessities such as bowls and cat food, and ensure that you satisfy all of the airline’s criteria, you and your cat will be perfectly fine on your journey.

Cabin vs. Cargo

When you’re going to take a cat on a flying trip, you might be a little apprehensive about it. What measures do you take to ensure the safety of your adorable furball? Is he going to be alarmed or not? Does he come with you to the cottage or do you leave him at home? When traveling with a cat, there is a lot to think about and consider. Providing you prepare ahead of time, pack travel necessities such as cat food and bowls, and ensure that you satisfy all of the airline’s criteria, you and your cat should be OK.

Airline Requirements Can Vary

Some airlines only accept a certain number of in-cabin dogs each trip, so double-check that there is still space before making your reservation. It’s also a good idea to inquire about pre-boarding, since doing so can make things a lot easier when travelling with cats. 1Each airline has its own set of regulations when it comes to traveling with cats. You’ll want to double-check with your airline to see if there are any additional costs, limitations, or special requirements. The airline American Airlines, for example, does not allow any “brachycephalic” cats to ride on its aircrafts.

Cats must also be at least eight weeks old in order to participate.

3 Your pet must have received a rabies vaccine at least 30 days before the travel, and in-cabin excursions are not permitted on flights to Hawaii or some overseas flights with a time difference of more than two hours.

Talk with Your Vet and Get Your Paperwork

Get your cat checked out by a veterinarian and find out whether he is healthy enough to fly. The use of a plane for cats with shorter faces and nasal passageways, such as Persians, may not be the best choice. 4 Your veterinarian’s immunization records and other documents will most likely be required by your airline as well. If your cat isn’t already microchipped, now is an excellent time to get him one.

Travel Supplies

In preparation for traveling with your cat, have all of your paperwork available, as well as a quick-release collar, identification tags with vaccination and contact information, as well as a harness for your cat. In addition, you should attach a tag on the carrier with your contact information on it as well. If your cat is required to go in the cargo hold, have a photo of your cat and the carrier with you in case you become separated from your pet while on the plane. A puppy pad for the bottom of the carrier could also be a good idea in case she has an accident within it.

Bring additional pads, food, medication (if applicable), travel bowls, and travel litter with you on your trip.

Due to security restrictions, you will need to have money in order to purchase a water bottle at the airport.

If you’re concerned about your cat being anxious, a Comfort Zone Calming Collar may be a good option. This drug-free treatment is based on the natural soothing pheromones produced by cats.

Carrier Training

Make certain that your cat’s carrier meets the regulations of the airline. If you need to purchase a new carrier, make sure your cat has plenty of time to become used to it before the trip. Preserve your cat’s favorite blanket and a few goodies in the carrier, which you should keep in your house. You want her to have positive connections with the carrier, thus you want her to do so.

Harness Training and Security Screening

Pet carriers must go through a security screening process that includes X-rays. This means you’ll have to remove your cat out of the carrier to make room for him. 5 Make sure you get a leash that is snug enough to keep your cat from escaping when you take him out of the carrier. Allow your cat to go for a few trial runs with a harness in your own house. It’s possible that your cat may stoop low to the ground the first time he wears a leash and scarcely move. It may take a few tries before he becomes accustomed to the sensations.

The Day of the Flight

X-ray security screening is required for pet carriers at the airport. In order to do so, you’ll need to remove your cat from its carrier. 5 Make sure you get a leash that is snug enough to prevent your cat from escaping when you take him out of the carrier. Practice with the harness on your cat at home for a few days. When your cat is initially introduced to a harness, he may hunch low to the ground and scarcely move. Before he gets acclimated to the sensation, it may take several attempts.

  1. RENEWED: KIM RENEWED: RENEWED: KIM RENEWED: RENEWED: RENEWED: RENEWED: “What It’s Really Like to Travel with Your Cats Across the Country on an Airplane” is a book about traveling with cats. Insider, 6 September 2018
  2. American Airlines, 6 September 2018. “Pets.” “In-Cabin Pets,” according to AA.com and United Airlines. United.com
  3. Humane Society of the United States “Travel Safely with Your Pet by Car, Plane, Ship, or Train,” the article states. Tammy Hunter of the Humane Society of the United States. “Taking Your Cat on a Plane.” VCA,

Flying with Your Cat

A successful flight with a cat begins months in advance of the actual flight day. It takes advance planning and preparation to ensure that the experience is as joyful as possible for both you and your feline companion. Make sure you do your research on the airline. Confirm if your cat will be able to fly in the airplane cabin under the seat in front of you by calling the airline. Make a formal agreement with your airline on the specific weight requirements and measurements under the airline seat, since this will determine the size of your transport carrier.

Make sure you have your cat’s travel carrier well in advance of your departure.

Teach your cat that the carrier is a comfortable place to hang out on a daily basis; feeding your cat in the carrier can assist to establish a good connection with the carrier.

Practice entering and exiting the carrier in order to make the operation as normal as possible – this will be key during the security screening procedure.

Most airlines demand that your cat travel with you with a valid health certificate for travel prepared by your veterinarian in order for him to be allowed to do so. Make sure your cat’s immunizations are up to date, and have the proof of rabies vaccination with you at all times when traveling.

Are there details I should attend to when booking my flight?

There are certain airlines that have restrictions on how many pets are allowed to travel in the cabin or on a particular trip, and they may have specific flights where pets are not permitted to travel in the cabin. Make your trip arrangements as soon as possible to ensure that your cat has a place to stay. When selecting your seat, keep in mind that you will not be allowed to sit in an exit row or against a bulkhead due to space restrictions (there must be a seat in front of you for the carrier).

How will I move through the security checkpoint at the airport?

Your cat’s travel carrier must pass through the luggage X-ray screening apparatus at the airport, but your cat is unable to do so, therefore you will have to carry her through the human screening device with your arms wrapped around her. To keep her from escaping, she should be secured in a firm-fitting harness with a leash attached. Then you should take the following precautions:

  1. Prepare yourself and your things by taking your shoes and toiletries out of your luggage, as well as your laptop or tablet, and placing them in the bins to be scanned by the X-ray machine
  2. Take your cat out of the carrier and run the carrier through the X-ray machine. Find your cat’s carrier and carefully reposition your cat within it once you have passed through the screening process with your cat. Then gather your stuff.

In order to comply with Federal Aviation Administration regulations, dogs in the airplane cabin must stay contained in their carriers for the duration of the trip.

What else will help my cat be comfortable on this trip?

Traveling on an empty stomach reduces the likelihood of experiencing nausea and vomiting, so skip breakfast the day before your flight. In the event that your cat has to urinate or defecate while traveling, you should line the carrier with an absorbent “puppy toilet pad.” Prepare for any possible cleaning and containment of a problem by packing additional pads as well as a couple of zip-lock bags, a few paper towels, and a few pairs of latex gloves. Bring some of your cat’s food with you, as well as a water bottle and a dish, and don’t forget to bring any prescriptions she is currently taking with you.

Should I ask my veterinarian for a cat sedative for travel?

In most cases, cats travel pretty well on their own, without the need for medication. The stress experienced by certain cats when subjected to air travel, on the other hand, might be quite high. Obtain advice from your veterinarian to devise the ideal travel strategy for your cat if she is not a good traveler. Cat flight de-stressing strategies include the following:

  • Cats travel fairly well most of the time and do not require any medicine to be administered. The stress experienced by certain cats when forced to air travel, on the other hand, can be extreme. If your cat does not travel well, consult with your veterinarian to devise the best travel strategy for her. The following are examples of strategies for de-stressing cat flight:

A little early planning, meticulous attention to detail, and consultation with your veterinarian may ensure that your cat’s flight is as “smooth as silk” as possible!

7 Tips to Make Flights Friendly and Stress-Free for Cats

Time allotted for reading: 4 minutes Casey, the Pet Safety Cat, is not like other cats in that he prefers to stay at home. This orange tabby has logged a lot of miles as my feline teaching companion for veterinarian-approved cat first aid/CPR seminars all across the country. He’s also logged a lot of miles in the car and the air. During his most recent journey, he traveled with me on a nonstop flight from Dallas to Washington, D.C., to give a Fear Free Pets presentation and teach a cat first aid workshop to guests at the Acatemy Conference in Dulles, Virginia.

  1. Casey’s sixth flight and thirteenth state visit since I adopted him as a kitten from the San Diego Humane Society highlighted his most recent milestones.
  2. Recognizing that cats, like some people, can experience feelings of dread, anxiety, and tension while traveling, I employ a variety of relaxing, Fear Free techniques when traveling with Casey to keep him quiet and relaxed.
  3. As a precaution, if your cat must accompany you on a flight due to a relocation, work trip, or visit to see family, spray his airplane carrier with Feliway or another feline soothing pheromone product such as Feliway.
  4. Make sure you have a pet diaper inside the carrier in case your cat needs to go potty during the journey.
  5. Following the completion of your reservation, contact the airline directly to schedule a reservation for your cat.
  6. Ascertain the record locator number for your cat before releasing him or her.
  7. It is necessary to bring your cat’s current medical documents in order to ensure that he is up to date on his vaccines.

As part of the security screening process, you will be required to remove your cat from the carrier and hold him as you walk through the screening.

Your cat should be secured in the carrier by a sturdy harness with a leash fastened to the D-ring on the side.

If at all feasible, opt for TSA Pre-Check to save time and avoid having to take your shoes off at the airport.

Attempt to keep your cat in his carrier as far away from a wandering dog or any other apparent hazard as possible.

See also:  How To Give A Cat A Flea Bath

Prevent a rough ride from occurring.

Holding your cat’s carrier in your hand while walking can cause it to wobble and rock, which are both actions that might make some cats uneasy or edgy, depending on their temperament.

Casey is seated in the pet stroller with his harness tied inside, and I am carrying my computer bag on my shoulder while I guide Casey through the airport.

We are heading somewhere, and he is looking forward to seeing the scenery and being met by cat-loving people.

Maintain calm for both the cat and the people.

Some people are allergic to cats, and others are scared of them.

Casey and other cats consider carriers to be safe havens.

It’s best not to speak to them in a babyish tone.

Cats are able to detect our emotional emotions, so try to maintain your composure.

Keep your cat in his carrier as you left the airport to make your way to your hotel, and make sure the driver who will pick you up allows pets in the vehicle before getting in.

Finally, give your cat bottled water on trips to limit the chance of having an upset stomach from tap water, and bring or purchase disposable litter boxes and lightweight litter to lessen the risk of developing an upset stomach from tap water.

I wish you a safe journey with your pets, Casey and I! Dr. Kenneth Martin, a board-certified veterinary behaviorist, and/or Debbie Martin, a veterinary technician expert in behavior, have both read and revised this article for accuracy and comprehensiveness.

Arden Moore is The Pet Health and Safety Coach. She is a best-selling author, radio show host, in-demand speaker and master certified pet first aid/CPR instructor who travels the country teaching with Pet Safety Dog Kona and Pet Safety Cat Casey. Learn more atwww.ardenmoore.comandwww.facebook.com/ardenmoore.

Published on the 24th of February, 2020.

The Ultimate Guide to Flying With a Cat on a Plane

Released on the 24th of February, 2020

Can You Fly With Your Cat on a Plane?

Yes, that is absolutely possible! Prior to packing up your belongings and travelling to the airport, you’ll need to do your homework. In the first instance, a health certificate is normally necessary for domestic travel, and it must be obtained within 10 days of departure, according to Stephanie Sheen, DVM, a veterinarian with the pet health care app Fuzzy. If your cat is at least eight weeks old, up to date on immunizations, and free of any indications of an infectious disease, this health certificate will certify that they are in excellent health.

“If the cat is good with traveling, doesn’t mind being in a travel box or suitcase, and is comfortable in unfamiliar surroundings, then it’s acceptable,” she adds.

The best thing to do if your cat is displaying indications of stress or anxiety like as excessive vocalization, excessive grooming, or drooling is to put him or her in the care of an adult relative or a trusted friend or pet sitter.

Flying With Your Cat Internationally

If you plan to go overseas, there will be a number of additional obstacles to overcome. Even if the laws are identical, Sheen notes that other places will require different immunizations for parasite protection and other health issues, even though the standards are comparable. “These documents can be many pages in length and are normally done by a veterinarian who is certified by the USDA,” she explains in further detail. It is possible that certain sites will requirerabiestiters to be completed prior to travel, which might take months to complete.

“Allow for lots of time to be spent negotiating this procedure.

Each Airline Has a Different Pet Travel Policy

What about the airlines, do you think? Almost all airlines allow cats to travel with their owners on their flights. Although many airlines allow many dogs to fly on a same aircraft, it is best to book in advance to guarantee that there will be no delays at check-in. Since booking online is not always a possibility, most of the time, this necessitates a phone call to the airlines. Each airline has its own requirements for pet carriers and weight limitations, so you will need to be certain that your luggage fulfills their specifications.

Sheen suggests booking non-stop flights in order to lessen the overall trip time—and, consequently, the stress—for your cat.

Also, keep in mind that you will not be permitted to seat in an exit row if you have a cat accompanying you. Some examples of prominent airlines and the pet carrier regulations they have are as follows:

  • As for Alaska Airlines, the hard-sided dimensions are 17″L x 11″H
  • The soft-sided dimensions are 17″L x 11″H
  • And the overall height is 7″. Carrier must be able to fit beneath the seat in front of you, according to American Airlines. There can’t be more than 20 pounds of total weight between the carrier and your pet. According to Delta Airlines, the carrier must be small enough to fit beneath the seat in front of you. JetBlue’s carrier measures 17 inches long, 12.5″ wide, and 8.5 inches high. If your pet and the carrier weigh more than 20 pounds, they must be transported in another vehicle. In the United States, the hard-sided carrier has the following dimensions: 17.5″L by 12 “W by 7.5 “H
  • The soft-sided carrier has the following dimensions: 18″L by 11 “W by 11 “H

How Much Does It Cost to Fly With a Cat on a Plane?

Being a cat parent requires a commitment of 15 to 20 years. Not only does this entail providing for your feline companion and showering them with affection, but it also entails financial obligations on your part. Flying with a cat is not without cost, since airlines impose a fee for each trip. Also, as previously said, because your cat qualifies as a carry-on, you’ll most likely be required to pay for a checked bag, which may cost anywhere from $20 to $40 depending on the airline you choose. Here’s a breakdown of the costs associated with flying with your cat on five major airlines:

6 Tips for Flying With a Cat Safely

It should be as simple and comfy as possible for you and your beloved little kitten to get from point A to point B together. Despite the fact that you will undoubtedly hear a lot of meows and experience some anxiety, there are several strategies you can use to prepare for the journey. These top advice from veterinarians will help you have a more pleasant encounter.

1. Be prepared for security.

In an ideal world, you would never have to take your cat out of their carrier until you’ve reached your destination without getting into any trouble. Unfortunately, that is not an option since security screenings require you to remove your animal from their carrier in order for the carrier to be scanned in the X-ray machine. Consequently, you will be required to transport your pet via the human screening machine. Sheen recommended that you place your cat in a well-fitting harness with a leash in order to prevent him from running away.

2. Consider a soft-sided travel carrier.

Many airlines enable passengers to fly in the cabin with either a soft-sided or a hard-sided carrier. According to Sheen, a soft-sided carrier, on the other hand, can be more forgiving and provide your cat with a little more room to turn around and be comfortable. So, if you’re having trouble deciding, think about which one would make your pet feel the most at peace before making your decision.

3. Make the carrier a happy place.

Because your feline companion will spend nearly all of his or her travel time in the carrier, Katy Nelson, DVM, a senior veterinarian at Chewy, recommends that you make the carrier as pleasant as possible for your feline companion. She recommends including objects that remind them of their home, like as a favorite toy or an old t-shirt or blanket that they enjoy to cuddle up to on cold nights. You may also apply a feline pheromone spray, such as Feliway, to help them feel more comfortable in their carrier.

This helps children to become comfortable with it and, as a result, not be afraid of it.

Continue to pack those identical goods in their carrier when it’s time to leave for your flight to avoid losing them.”

4. Pack essentials.

When traveling with cats, it’s essential to be overprepared in case of an accident or an emergency, as Nelson points out. You should bring the leash, harness, a foldable dish, wipes, and dog treats along with you. According to her, “Most carriers will have a location to store these items, but keep food and drink separate to minimize any spillage.” “It’s also critical to clearly identify yourself, your phone number, and the destination location on your shipping container.”

5. Avoid feeding the morning of travel.

Even though it may sound cruel, it may be preferable not to feed your cat in the morning before taking out on your flight. What is the reason behind this? Because some cats will feel nausea and vomiting, it is preferable to have less food in their stomach, according to Sheen. Of course, you should still make certain that they are properly hydrated! It is also recommended to line the carrier with an absorbent pad, such as a puppy potty pad, in order to absorb any accidents that may occur.

6. Talk to your vet about medication.

While the majority of cats do not require medication, it may be necessary if your cat is suffering from extreme anxiety. Sheen recommends that you consult with your veterinarian, who will be able to advise you on whether prescription sedatives will be required for your journey. Because they do pose a health risk, you should take precautions to guarantee that your cat will be safe before using them.

How to Take Your Cat on a Plane

Bringing a cat or kitten along on a commercial aircraft may appear to be a simple concept, but the practicalities may become complicated quickly. You’ll almost certainly be subjected to additional fees, as well as documentation requirements and other limitations, which may vary depending on the airline you choose. Flights may be made safe and comfortable for you and your cat with a little knowledge and planning ahead of time. There are very few differences between travelling with a dog and flying without one, but as with canines, you should consult with your veterinarian and your airline well in advance of your flight.

Know your cat’s travel options

If your pet’s carrier fits beneath the seat in front of you, it will most likely be able to travel in the cabin with you. Generally speaking, this implies a pet weighing up to roughly 20 pounds, which is a smaller obstacle for cat owners to overcome than it is for dog owners. The amount of under-seat space varies from plane to plane, and many airlines restrict the number of dogs that may be transported on a voyage. It is for this reason that you should verify with the airline. It is not permitted to purchase an additional seat for your cat.

Please keep in mind that a cat in its carrier counts as one of your permitted carry-on bags.

. Or as cargo

The second option is to transport your cat as cargo in a pressurized and temperature-controlled container aboard a commercial flight. Cats can travel in this manner as checked baggage on the same plane as you, or as unaccompanied shipment cargo on a separate aircraft. If the cat is traveling as unaccompanied freight, there may be shipping timelines to consider; check with your airline for more information.

The Humane Society of the United States recommends that you avoid traveling with your cat anyplace else than the cabin if at all possible. Cats are not always allowed to be transported as cargo on several carriers, including United Airlines.

Understand the costs of each

Despite the fact that you won’t be able to purchase an additional seat for your cat, you will still need to make a reservation for it. Some of the largest airlines in the United States charge $125 per person, per way, for an in-cabin cat. Other carriers, such as Southwest Airlines ($95) and JetBlue ($100), charge fees that are far less expensive. Prices are effective as of February 2018. Frequently, you will be required to pay the charge when you arrive at the airport on the day of your flight.

Pets that travel as cargo sometimes incur higher costs – for example, cats checked as luggage on American Airlines cost $200 each trip each way.

Research health requirements, other rules

In order to ensure that your cat is healthy enough to travel by airline, you should have your veterinarian inspect it. If you’re shipping your cat as cargo, keep in mind that certain airlines have breed restrictions, so check with them beforehand. In order to avoid respiratory discomfort when flying at high altitudes, American Airlines does not accept snub-nosed brachycephalic cats of any mix, including Burmese, Persian, and Himalayan, on its flights. Following the advice of the airline industry association Airlines for America, you may be required to get a health certificate from a veterinarian several days before your flight.

See also:  How To Euthanize A Cat

For example, airlines may impose additional limitations regardless of whether the cat is flying in the cabin or as cargo.

For further information, see the website of your airline.

Consider the carrier

Consult with your veterinarian to ensure that your cat is in good enough health to travel by aircraft with you. If you plan to ship your cat as cargo, keep in mind that certain airlines have breed restrictions. In order to avoid respiratory discomfort when flying at high altitudes, American Airlines does not allow snub-nosed brachycephalic cats of any mix, such as Burmese, Persian, and Himalayan, on board. According to the airline industry association Airlines for America, you may need to get a health certificate from a veterinarian several days before you fly.

Depending on whether the cat is flying in the cabin or cargo, airlines may impose additional limitations on its travels.

Visit the website of your airline for additional information.

International flights

Consult your veterinarian to ensure that your cat is in good enough health to travel by airline. If you’re shipping your cat as cargo, keep in mind that certain airlines have breed restrictions. For example, American Airlines does not accept snub-nosed brachycephalic cats of any mix, including Burmese, Persian, and Himalayan cats, for concern of respiratory problems at high altitudes. According to the airline industry trade association Airlines for America, you may need to get a health certificate from a veterinarian several days before you fly.

For example, airlines may impose additional limitations regardless of whether the cat is transported in the cabin or as cargo.

United Airlines, for example, requires kittens to be at least 2 pounds or 10 weeks old before they may fly with the airline. More information may be found on the website of your airline.

If your cat is an emotional support animal

Consult with your veterinarian to ensure that your cat is in good enough health to travel by airline. If you’re planning on shipping your cat as cargo, keep in mind that certain airlines have breed restrictions. For example, American Airlines does not accept snub-nosed brachycephalic cats of any mix, including Burmese, Persian, and Himalayan, because of the possibility of respiratory difficulty at high altitudes. According to the airline industry trade association Airlines for America, you may need to get a health certificate from a veterinarian several days before your flight.

For example, airlines may impose additional limitations regardless of whether the cat flies in the cabin or as cargo.

For further information, go to the website of your airline.

Tips for flight day

In order to ensure that your cat is healthy enough to travel by airline, you should have your veterinarian inspect it. If you’re shipping your cat as cargo, keep in mind that certain airlines have breed restrictions, so check with them beforehand. In order to avoid respiratory discomfort when flying at high altitudes, American Airlines does not accept snub-nosed brachycephalic cats of any mix, including Burmese, Persian, and Himalayan, on its flights. Following the advice of the airline industry association Airlines for America, you may be required to get a health certificate from a veterinarian several days before your flight.

For example, airlines may impose additional limitations regardless of whether the cat is flying in the cabin or as cargo.

For further information, see the website of your airline.

Security screening

You tether your cat and carry or lead it through the metal detector while the cat’s carrier is scanned by an X-ray machine at an airport security checkpoint. Consider becoming a member of TSA PreCheck, which allows you to utilize shorter lines and avoid having to remove your shoes and a light jacket while traveling. Maintaining consistency among airlines’ pet regulations is important to bear in mind once again. You should contact your airline directly when arranging a vacation to guarantee that both you and your cat arrive at their destination safely and without incident.

Airline pet policies

When making travel options for your pet, choose the one that is the safest and most pleasant for him or her. For example, unless you will be able to spend a significant amount of time with your dog, he or she will be happiest staying at home rather than accompanying you on your vacation.

Cats are nearly usually happier in their own environment, as a general rule. However, if you have determined that it is advisable to bring your pet along, follow our suggestions for a stress-free and safe journey.

By car

Do you know where to put your dog or cat in your car to keep them safe?

Dogs shouldn’t roam in the car

Dogs should be transported in a box that has been securely fastened to the vehicle using a seat belt or other appropriate means. Dog restraints or seat belts are beneficial for stopping your dog from running around the car and being a distraction to the driver, but they have not been demonstrated to be effective in protecting dogs during an accident in controlled studies. Car Transporters are available on Amazon.com.

Cats belong in carriers

Most cats are not happy traveling in automobiles, so for their own protection as well as yours, put them in a carrier while you are driving. While driving, it is critical to keep these carriers securely fastened so that they do not bounce about and injure your cat. This can be accomplished by fastening a seat belt across the front of the carrier.

Leave the front seat for humans

Pets should be transported in the backseat of the automobile. If an airbag deploys while your pet is in the passenger seat (even if he or she is restrained in a crate), it might cause serious injury to your pet.

Keep those heads inside!

Pets such as dogs and cats should always be kept in a secure location within the vehicle. Pets who are permitted to stick their heads out the window may be hurt by flying debris or become ill as a result of breathing in cold air that has been pushed into their lungs. Never carry a pet in the back of a pickup truck with the doors open.

Give your pet plenty of rest stops

Stopping regularly will allow your pet to get some exercise and to relieve itself. However, you should never let your pet to leave the car without a collar, an ID tag, and a leash.

Bring along a human buddy

Make every effort to divide driving and pet-care responsibilities with a friend or family member whenever possible. At rest breaks, you’ll be able to buy food and use the restrooms with the assurance that someone you trust is keeping an eye on your dogs.

Don’t ever leave your pet alone in a car

Even while a simple pit break may seem like it takes no time at all, it is far too long to leave your pet alone in the car. Heat is a severe hazard: when the temperature outside is 72 degrees Fahrenheit, the temperature inside your automobile may reach 116 degrees Fahrenheit in less than an hour. In just 10 minutes on an 85-degree day, even with the windows partially open, the temperature inside your car may reach 102 degrees. If you’re confident of your arrival time, it’s possible to be delayed — in as little as 30 minutes, you may return to a 120-degree vehicle and an animal that has suffered permanent organ damage or death.

Increase awareness of the hazards of leaving dogs in a hot car by printing our Hot Car flyer (PDF), putting it in public locations, and sharing it with your friends, family, and coworkers.

Everything You Need to Fly With a Cat, According to Feline Experts

Photograph courtesy of GraphicaArtis/Getty Images You may not be traveling for pleasure right now, but you may be bringing your dogs with you if you have a major relocation coming up or if you expect to be away from home for a lengthy amount of time in the near future. It’s understandable if you’re worried about travelling with a cat that is notoriously finicky and fastidious about his or her surroundings. Several measures you may do before leaving your house for the airport will make your trip go more easily.

  • The Best Friends Animal Society’s Levi Myers, a cat carer, suggests that you schedule a visit with your veterinarian first, because many airlines need a current health certificate and vaccination record before boarding.
  • Pet rules differ from airline to airline, so be sure you have all of the necessary documents and a carrier that meets the size criteria of your particular airline before you go.
  • Myers suggests looking for a soft carrier that will fit under the seat and allow you to check on your cat while in flight without having to open the carrier.
  • Sleepypod Air is a favorite of Mikel Delgado, a cat behavior specialist with Rover, who loves it since it’s particularly built to fit beneath aircraft seats.
  • “Instruct your cat to perceive the carrier as a secure area,” she advises.
  • ” It is likely that the familiar-smelling blanket will offer them with some comfort during the travel.” When Rio Viera-Newton, a strategist and writer, recently traveled great distances with her cat, Martini, she appreciated the fact that this expandable carrier opened on all four sides.
  • “Because it is made of high-quality materials, it is highly sturdy and can endure years of travel with your cat,” she explains.

Despite the fact that your cat will remain in the carrier for the duration of the flight, you may be required to remove him or her when passing through security.

Myers like harnesses of the figure-eight type, which fasten around the neck and chest for more security and comfort.

Delgado advises that you may also request a private area for TSA screening, which may make the process feel less rushed.

Both Myers and Delgado advise that you line your carrier with a pee pad and that you pack many spares just in case one of them becomes damaged or has to be replaced.

Schwab also suggests keeping a supply of these all-natural, biodegradable wipes on hand in case your cat gets into anything and wants to clean it up a little bit.

These foldable silicone bowls are convenient to clean and transport since they fold down flat when not in use and come with carabiners for attaching to your cat carrier when not in use.

Cat owners know that there are few greater diversions than their feline’s favorite snacks.

“All you have to do is put your cat’s favorite goodies in the ball and watch them swat away to their hearts’ delight,” she explains.

Among her favorite cat beds is this one from Petstages, which features a touch-activated purring mechanism that should be comforting for your cat to cuddle up with.

It’s probably a good idea to test them out at home first to see how your cat reacts.

Some of our most recent discoveries include the greatest acne treatments, rolling luggage, side sleeper pillows, natural anxiety therapies, and bath towels, to name a few.

We update links as often as we can, but please keep in mind that bargains sometimes expire and that all prices are subject to change. Everything You’ll Need to Fly With a Cat is Right Here!

What it’s really like to travel with your cats across the country on an airplane

Zelda, my cat, was not pleased with the experience of traveling by plane. Kim Renfro is an Insider contributor. Even taking my indoor cats to the vet was a traumatic experience, so you can imagine my dismay when I discovered I’d have to fly them across the nation to get them treated. When my husband and I relocated from New York City to Los Angeles this past summer, we brought our two five-year-old cats with us to make the transition easier. Despite the fact that the procedure ended up being less meow-filled than I had anticipated, there were some bumps in the road along the way.

My husband and I had lots of lead time on our move date, so I started preparing long in advance.

We purchased each cat a soft-sided carrier that matched the requirements of the airline. Amazon The carriers have to be the same size as the ones stated on our airline’s official website. Alaska Airlines is our preferred carrier (formerly Virgin America). In addition to the additional pad for the interior of our carriers, which we got on Amazon, They were clipped to keep the cats from scratching the zippers and opening them.

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I had read online that you should acclimate your cat to their carrier in positive ways, so they aren’t completely taken off guard by the first trip out.

Lily is safely tucked away in her carrier at home. Kim Renfro/INSIDERS Photo courtesy of Kim Renfro Twice a week for around thirty minutes, we’d put the cats in their carrier for the duration of the session. It wasn’t uncommon for them to meow and paw at the edges of the cage, but we always made sure to reward them with snacks and lots of positive attention afterwards. As an additional precaution, I usedNature’s Miracle Calming Spray on the carriers; nevertheless, I couldn’t tell whether it made any difference.

Finally, it came time to book our flights. We called the airline and spoke with a representative about traveling with the cats.

This is how one of our cats, Lily, usually cuddles up to me when she wants to. Kim Renfro is an Insider contributor. A representative from the airline informed us that a maximum of five animals were permitted in the main cabin each trip. We were able to book the ticket we wanted online after confirming that there was still space for dogs on the aircraft we selected. Once our flights were confirmed, we phoned back and paid the pet cost ($100 per cat) to have it added to our boarding passes.

The Alaska Airline representative had told us that the company didn’t require any additional paperwork for the cat, but our airport might.

Our cat Lily usually cuddles up to me in this manner while we’re together. INVESTIGATOR Kim Renfro A spokesperson from the airline informed us that a maximum of five animals were permitted in the main cabin per aircraft at any one time. Our booking options were open to us after confirming that there was still room for dogs on the aircraft we selected. As soon as our flights were confirmed, we returned the call and added the pet cost ($100 per cat) to our reservation.

In a rotten bit of luck, Zelda came down with a weird eye infection just one week before our flight was scheduled.

She was a disgruntled young lady. Kim Renfro/INSIDERBecause she was on antibiotics and had received all of her immunizations, our veterinarian allowed her to travel. However, we were required to confine her in a cone.

We also procured some sedatives for the cats, and did a test run a couple days before the flight.

Zelda is safely contained in one of her cat carriers. Kim Renfro is an Insider contributor. As instructed by the veterinarian, we were to provide each pill on a day when we would be there to supervise them and ensure that they did not have any adverse reactions to the medication.

As our veterinarian also informed us, some cats have an adverse reaction to the sedative, which means they become much more anxious and meow louder than if the cat had been left “sober” after being given the medication.

The test was very helpful, and showed us Zelda became more vocal while Lily chilled way out.

Zoey with her cat carriers on her back porch. INVESTIGATOR Kim Renfro As instructed by the veterinarian, we were to provide each tablet on a day when we would be there to supervise them and ensure that they did not have any adverse reactions to the pills. As our veterinarian also informed us, some cats have an adverse reaction to the sedative, which means they become much more anxious and meow louder than if the cat had been left “sober” after being given the drug.

On the morning of the flight, though, both cats were agitated.

Everything we brought with us for the flight (sans cats). Kim Renfro/INSIDERWe had completely de-cluttered our flat the night before, with the exception of our air mattress, bags, backpacks, and cat carriers. Both cats became agitated as a result of this, as most of their favorite hiding places in the home had been taken away.

The vet had told us that the sedative wouldn’t work if the cat was already in a heightened and anxious mood.

Lily in our bare flat, with no one else around. Kim Renfro/INSIDE EDITION We had chosen not to give it to Zelda for the flight, but we decided to give it to Lily just to see how she would react. This time, though, it did not work. She began meowing as soon as I placed her in the carrier, and she didn’t seem to be able to relax for the rest of the trip.

Both cats were clearly flustered, but it wasn’t too terrible.

Lily at our bare apartment, which is now vacant. Photo courtesy of Kim Renfro/INSIDE. Despite the fact that we had chosen not to give it to Zelda for the flight, we tested it on Lily just to see how she would react. It didn’t work this time around. It was clear she was not comfortable in the carrier the moment I placed her in it, and she didn’t get any more comfortable after that.

We got into a Lyft to head the airport, and held the cats on our laps in the carriers.

We were on our way. Kim Renfro is an Insider contributor. There was no turning back at this point, and I knew I had to do all in my power to keep my fears to a bare minimum at all times. Even though I had been dreading this trip for months, I quickly realized that there was nothing I could do once things got going and the plane took off.

We made our way through check in and security, each taking one cat.

Because, as you might imagine, we were in a rush, I didn’t capture any shots of the cats outside of their carriers before we left. Kim Renfro/INSIDERMY husband and I both have TSA Pre-Check, but the terminal where our aircraft was departing didn’t have a pre-check line, so we had to wait in the regular queue. Instead, we were permitted to keep our shoes on, but we were still had to remove our computers. After passing through the metal detectors, the TSA personnel had to swab the palms of our hands as well.

The cats wriggled a bit as we held them in the security area, but we kept a firm grip on them and had them back in their carriers soon.

My husband and our two daughters, Lily and Zelda, are in the post-security area. Kim Renfro/INSIDERI recommends that you have a game plan for your baggage and who will be carrying whom before you get to the security checkpoints, because the TSA will not be helpful and you do not want to be scurrying at the last minute to get everything together.

We brought the cats to our gate, and waited some more.

Lily was meowing more regularly now, so I wrapped my sweatshirt around her carrier to keep her safe.

Kim Renfro is an Insider contributor. When the girls were in their carriers, they were quite attentive and turning often. Bring something to cover the sides of the room with so that the sensory overload might be reduced, I strongly advise you to do so.

We boarded with the very first group since we had animals and wanted to get them settled.

My sweater became a cat carrier for Lily, since she began to meow more regularly now. INVESTIGATOR Kim Renfro While in their carriers, the kids were quite attentive and turned a great deal. Bring something to cover the sides of the room with so that the sensory overload can be reduced, I strongly advise you to do this.

Pre-boarding was really helpful, since the plane was effectively empty as we got on.

Two hours have elapsed; there are six more to go. Kim Renfro/INSIDE EDITION The thought of dealing with the crowds and higher noise levels that are associated with most standard boarding procedures did not appeal to us at all.

Since the height of the carriers was slightly longer than the space, the flexible sides were squished down a bit.

One of the carriers is hidden beneath the seat. Kim Renfro is an Insider contributor. However, there was enough of space inside for the cats to stretch out and turn around if they needed to.

Once again, I had to remind myself there was little I could do now.

If you have the opportunity, treat yourself to a glass of wine and an in-flight movie at this point. Kim Renfro/INSIDE EDITION We were on the plane, and I had little control over the degree of loudness or the discomfort of the animals at this point. It was only a matter of sitting back and hoping that they would fall asleep.

Throughout the flight, my husband and I would bend down and speak to the cats.

“It’s all right! We’re right around the corner! You are not going to die!” Kim Renfro/INSIDE EDITION Our cats, who are both five years old, are quite familiar with our voices. I wanted to make certain that they were aware that we were still present and that they had not been abandoned to spend the rest of their days in a terrible black hellbox up in the sky.

For the duration of our flight, both Lily and Zelda meowed intermittently, but it was never very loud.

Taking in the sights of Los Angeles from our window seat. Kim Renfro/INSIDE EDITION We were in the center and window seats, and I don’t believe the person in the aisle seat next to us was aware of the cat’s meowing until after we landed. We were able to get through the six-hour travel without any problems thanks to three in-flight movies and a lot of deep breathing exercises.

We had made sure not to feed them the morning of the flight, and so neither cat went to the bathroom inside their carrier.

We packed food and drink bowls in our carry-on luggage in case the worst happened. A spare bottom pad was included with each Kim Renfro/INSIDEREach carrier in case of an emergency. We provided them with a portable litter box, food, and a zippered bag of litter for added convenience. We also took some disposable wet wipes, but we didn’t need to use them because the weather was perfect.

After waiting to pick up our luggage, it was back into a car and over to our new apartment.

While we are waiting for our luggage, Lily is relaxing on an airport chair. Kim Renfro/INSIDE EDITION When I got to the airport, I was pleasantly impressed by how clean and stress-free the actual trip had been. After much deliberation, it came down to ignoring a few meows and recalling that people fly around the world with their dogs on a regular basis.

We had made sure to deliver a brand new litter box, litter, and food to our new apartment in advance.

We’re sleeping on an inflatable mattress in the new apartment, with Zelda and Lily. Kim Renfro is an Insider contributor. I found it really convenient to simply drive from the airport to the new apartment, with no stops for groceries or other necessities in between. We got the litter box and fresh food dishes set up as soon as we could and allowed the cats out to relieve themselves.

It took about four days for Lily and Zelda to return to their normal selves.

Lily is finally enjoying some rest and relaxation on my pillows.

Kim Renfro is an Insider contributor. For a time, they were timid and skittish, and Lily hid beneath our bathroom sink on a number of occasions. When it comes to cats, this is typical of any moving situation — you simply want to give them some space and try to keep the chaos to a minimum.

Zelda even got to take her cone off, which also helped her settle into a new mode of relaxation.

On my cushions, Lily is finally able to enjoy some R & R. INVESTIGATOR Kim Renfro The girls were apprehensive and frightened for a time, and Lily took to hiding beneath our bathroom sink on a regular basis. Whenever you are in this position with cats, it is normal to offer them space while attempting to keep the disturbance as little as possible.

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