How To Get A Cat To Use A Scratching Post

How to Train Your Cat to Use a Scratching Post

When it comes to the topic of “How to stop a cat from scratching furniture,” teaching your cat to use a cat scratching post is a vital and crucial step to consider. First and foremost, it is critical to understand how to select the best cat scratching post. Finding a scratching post for your cat that she will naturally gravitate toward is much easier if you take the time to select one that she will naturally gravitate toward and like using. Having done so, you may utilize the following suggestions to teach your cat to use a scratching post instead of clawing your furniture or carpets.

Get a scratching post.

Before Training, Find the Best Place to Put Your Cat Scratching Posts

Making sure that your cat utilizes her new scratching posts is an important step in ensuring that she does so. This involves placing the posts in the most appropriate parts of the house. The most effective scratching post placement is achieved by an understanding of regular cat scratching activities. In spite of the fact that we humans may have preferences for where we’d want cat scratching posts to be located in our homes (typically in corners and out of the way areas), these aren’t necessarily the finest locations in our feline companions’ eyes (or vice versa).

Some of the more entrenched causes for cat scratching habit are as follows:

  • Cats scratch to communicate with other cats about their territory, which is something we may take into consideration when deciding where to put cat scratching posts. In addition to visible scratch marks on things, the odors that are deposited from glands in the cat’s paws serve as communication signals that other cats can readily detect and decipher. With this in mind, it goes without saying that your cat would not consider a corner or an inconspicuous region to be an appropriate location to leave such messages. She wants a flashing billboard in the form of a tall, robust scratching post strategically placed in a visible location of the house to advertise her business. To gratify this evolved feline drive, place yourself in high-traffic areas and unhidden spots in your home. But don’t give up hope. Once your cat has established a reliable scratching post, it can usually be relocated (slowly and gradually over a period of weeks) to a location that is more in keeping with your home’s overall design scheme. Another reason for cats to scratch is to stretch the muscles in their bodies, particularly the shoulders, toes, and feet
  • It’s one of their favorite things to do when they first wake up, which makes the area around their preferred sleeping areas a perfect location for scratching posts as well
  • It is possible that your cat is clawing at a particular section of carpet, and that this is an appropriate location for your cat scratching post or scratching pad. You already know she enjoys that area, and placing a heavy blanket around the area may help her understand that you prefer she scratch on the scratching post or pad rather than on the carpeting. If your cat is scratching at the arms of your couch or the sides of other furniture, placing a heavy blanket around the area, tucked in tightly so that she cannot get under it, can often deter her from scratching. Afterwards, position her cat scratching post precisely in front of the thing she had been clawing earlier. Once she has been reliably using the scratching post for a week or two and has left the furniture alone, you may begin relocating the scratching post to your ideal location at the pace of an inch or so each day.

Finally, a word on where to put a cat scratching post: It improves the probability that your furniture and carpet will be left alone if you provide cats with various scratching posts in different places of your home. If your cat is already scratching on an improper object or in an inappropriate location, you may study it to learn important information. Scratches that are high or low, on a vertical or horizontal surface, in a corner, or under a bed are all possibilities. You can use this information to assist you in determining the type and location of scratching posts and pads.

They may love scratching in unusual locations, such as beneath the bed or in the closet, where they can’t get to otherwise.

Drumming up Interest in the Scratching Post

Don’t be concerned if your cat doesn’t utilize her new scratching post right away or if she only shows a passing interest in it. There are instances when they require a bit more persuasion before they realize that you have supplied them with the nicest scratching surface possible. Some pointers for introducing your cat to her new scratching post and teaching her how to utilize it are provided below.

  • While young kittens and some cats are not interested in catnip, many cats are completely enthralled by the plant. You should sprinkle some loose-leaf catnip on the base and the top of your cat scratching post if you have one of these cats as a reward. Your cat will normally start kneading her paws as soon as she licks it off her paws. This will allow her to learn that it is an excellent scratching surface, and she will remember this and exploit it to its maximum potential in the future
  • Play: You may assist your cat in learning that her new scratching post is fantastic by engaging in interactive play with her around and on it. A wand-style cat toy is an excellent tool for accomplishing this goal. You may use this to encourage your cat to reach up and place her paws on the scratching post while she’s reaching and diving for the toy, which will benefit both of you. Additionally, you may try placing your cat’s favorite toy on top of the post to entice her to climb up to retrieve it. She’ll soon discover that scratching on the post is something she enjoys doing as well
  • Turn the scratching post on its side to see if it works better. When working with a cat who has never used a scratching post before, it may be beneficial to turn the post on its side to get them started. Utilize the strategies outlined above, such as sprinkling catnip and playing around and on the post, particularly with wand toys. You may raise the scratching post to a higher height once your cat has been using it in this position for a few days to bring even more delight. The more cats you have, the more scratching posts you will need. Provide tiny toys and balls around the scratching posts to encourage your cats to interact with one another and to play with each other on and around the scratching posts. Some cats enjoy goodies, so have a couple in your pocket when you’re introducing the scratching post to your feline friend. If your cat sniffs and explores the post at first, you may reward him or her with a treat. As she grows more accustomed to it, reward her whenever she sets her paws on it, gradually increasing the amount of treats she receives until she scratches it. Alternatively, you may try placing some snacks on top of the post. This will entice her to climb up the pole and get the goodies. If you provide treats to your cat, he will have a very happy experience with the scratching post. With your efforts to increase your cat’s interest in her scratching posts, you can use a product called Feliway, a spray that mimics the feline facial pheromones that make cats feel good. Spray it on any household object that your cat is currently scratching a few times per day to help increase her interest. Your cat will not only understand that you want her to use the post, but she will also realize that you don’t want her to use the furniture if you utilize both approaches concurrently.

When trying to introduce a cat to a new scratching post, one method that almost never works is grabbing her paws and placing them on the post. Cats are well-known for having their own thoughts and preferring things that are their own creation. Manipulating their paws is often considered a no-no in the eyes of most cats, and it will almost certainly result in their avoiding the scratching post. A kitten that is extremely young may be an exception to this rule.

It is generally possible to teach them how to utilize a scratching post in this manner, especially if you do not have an older cat in the house to serve as a model for them. Play, as previously mentioned, has been shown to be quite effective with kittens.

Negative Training Methods Usually Backfire

Note on negative training methods: There are a variety of ways to cat training that strive to correlate negative consequences with an undesirable feline behavior in order to cause the feline to refrain from repeating the behavior in the future. Squirting water in your cat’s face, creating a loud noise with coins in a can, setting up mousetraps to terrify or harm a cat, shouting, and any other comparable techniques are all examples of physical punishment. These negative reinforcement strategies are seldom effective with cats, and they may even be harmful, since they may entirely backfire or result in damage.

They may urinate or defecate in places other than the litterbox, including as on carpets or personal belongings.

In the worst case scenario, they may withdraw and hide, or they may refuse to eat.

Final Words

If you have followed all of the instructions above for training your cat to use her new scratching post and she still does not appear to be interested in it, consider shifting the scratching post to a different location before giving up. The placement of a lovely area in front of a window is frequently a smart idea, and if there are birds or other animals nearby for your cat to spy on, the excitement will almost always result in a scratching session. A little planning, some patience, and lots of positive reinforcement will have your cat disregarding your furniture and rugs in favor of her new scratching posts on a regular basis soon.

How to Get Your Cat to Use a Scratching Post

Documentation Download Documentation Download Documentation Cats like scratching objects with the pads of their front paws. A cat’s scratching activity is an instinctual action that aids in the distribution of his or her smell. Scratching is also an essential method of establishing territory, and it helps cats feel more safe in their surroundings. When your cat, on the other hand, decides to scratch your new couch or a piece of antique furniture, this behavior becomes a source of concern. The most effective technique is to focus your cat’s attention to a scratching post instead.

  1. 1Choose a scratching post that is at least six feet tall. Cats require the ability to reach as high as they possibly can in order to scratch and stretch. You may find that your cat doesn’t even notice the scratching post if it’s too short. If your cat can stand on her hind legs and reach over her head with her front paws, the post should be high enough to accommodate her needs. 2 Check to see if the post is stable. In order to ensure that your cat’s scratching post is stable, try mounting it to a wall or ensuring that it has a firm base that will not move as the cat scratches it. She will not feel safe if she perceives that the post is shifting or moving
  2. As a result, she may refuse to utilize the post.
  • Generally speaking, scratching boards that are leaning against a wall or hanging like a portrait are disliked with cats.
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  • s3 Choosing a texture that your cat will enjoy is important. Individual cats prefer various textures to scratch on depending on their temperament. If you are unsure about what your cat would enjoy, a natural rope coiled around a solid column makes an excellent beginner scratcher.
  • Prevent using plastic ropes or artificial fibers, since these materials might generate static electricity, which cats despise. If your cat enjoys scratching the carpet, you might want to attempt attaching a piece of carpet to a sturdy post. Other textures to explore experimenting with include corrugated cardboard and fabric, among others.
  • 4 Get more than one blog article published. Your cat may like to scratch in more than one location, so plan to purchase or construct a number of scratching posts throughout the home. In addition, having many scratching posts will guarantee that your cat always has access to a scratching post, no matter where she may be. The need of having many posts becomes much more apparent if you have multiple cats.
  • A separate post should be provided for each cat in your household if you have more than one.
  1. 1 Position the posts in a convenient location where your cat may easily reach them. Place the posts in areas where the cat will derive “value” from utilizing them as a territorial marker in order to get the most out of them. Scratching posts should be placed at doors and exits, near windows, or in front of an object that she currently uses as a scratching post, among other areas.
  • Place your cat’s scratching post in areas where you don’t want him to snag something. Please do not put the sign in an inconspicuous or out of the way location. It will be ignored by your cat. In order for your cat to enjoy scratching the post, it should be positioned in a scratching position. Ensure that the post is in a vertical position, for example, if your cat loves to scratch vertical surfaces such as the side of the sofa
  • If your cat has a habit of scratching after waking up, consider placing a scratching post near his or her favorite sleeping position as well. If you’re fostering kittens or cats, set up a scratching post on either side of the barrier door to provide them with some exercise. Your cats will have a safe haven to unleash any pent-up territorial energy in this manner.
  • Distract your cat’s attention away from his favorite piece of furniture. If your cat has a penchant for scratching furniture, you might want to consider covering the portion of the furniture she loves to scratch with tin foil or double-sided adhesive tape. Cats despise the sensation of tin foil and sticky surfaces, therefore using it to prevent your cat from scratching should be effective.
  • Covering the sofa with rugs might also be an option, but this can be a problematic solution since your cat may begin clawing the rugs as a result of the scratching.
  • 3 Make scratching posts more appealing to your cat by decorating them. Scratching posts may be made more appealing to your cat by applying her own smell or a little amount of catnip. Utilize your cat’s paws to demonstrate how to use a scratching post, or rub some catnip onto the post to attract her interest.
  • By making gently scratching motions with her paws on the post, you might encourage your cat to utilize the post more often. This will aid in the addition of her smell to the post, increasing the likelihood that she will utilize it. Make sure to give your cat lots of praise while you’re doing this, and consider spraying the scratching post with Feliway to make it more appealing. Feliway is a synthetic feline pheromone that is used to help cats feel comfortable and secure in their surroundings. As an added bonus, it enhances the strength of her smell signals, which she will love.
  1. 1 Recognize that cats communicate mostly through smell. Cats have smell glands between their toes, which produce a distinct aroma that they leave behind. Cats frequently communicate with one another by smelling their surroundings.
  • A cat will scent mark her territory in order to alert other cats to her presence, to inform other cats of when she was last there, and to make herself feel comfortable and secure in her surroundings.
  • Cats scratching is a sort of stretching exercise, and you should be aware of this. Cats scratch as a means of stretching their muscles as well. The muscles on their backs and legs are stretched as a result of scratching, which is a pleasant sensation for cats. In many ways, it is comparable to the way we stretch in the morning or after sitting for an extended period of time. Keep in mind that cats frequently prefer to scratch surfaces that feel good to them. Cats enjoy scratching surfaces that are comfortable for their paws to rest on. Because of this, some cats will wind up destroying a costly piece of furniture or a rug that has sentimental value. Scratching serves as a kind of stress relief, hence it is vital for them to do so on a consistent basis.
  • Consider providing a replacement scratcher that has a texture that is comparable to your cat’s favourite scratching surface.
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  • Question What are the benefits of scratching posts for cats? Molly DeVoss is the Secretary of Education. Feline Training and Behavior Specialist with a certificate of completion Cat Behavior Consultant with a certificate of completion Molly DeVoss is a Certified Feline Training and Behavior Specialist (CFTBS), a Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (CCBC), a Fear Free Certified Trainer (FFCT), and the Founder of Cat Behavior Solutions. She has over ten years of experience in the cat training and behavior field. Molly specializes in the use of positive reinforcement to change and avoid undesired behaviors in cats, as well as lowering the number of cats surrendered to shelters. For the last three years, Molly has served on the Dallas Animal Advisory Committee, and she was just named one of Catpetclub.com’s Top 12 Extraordinary Cat Behaviorists of 2020. She holds certifications from the Animal Behavior Institute as well as the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants, among other organizations. She is also the host of the weekly podcast Cat Talk Radio, which she produces with her husband. Feline Training and Behavior Specialist with a certificate of completion Cat Behavior Consultant with a certificate of completion Answer from an expert Having scent glands between their toes allows your cats to leave behind their characteristic fragrance as well as visible lines that possible intruders can see. A scratching post allows your cats to leave behind their signature scent as well as visual lines that potential intruders can notice
  • Question What is the best place to put a cat post? Molly DeVoss is the Secretary of Education. Feline Training and Behavior Specialist with a certificate of completion Cat Behavior Consultant with a certificate of completion Molly DeVoss is a Certified Feline Training and Behavior Specialist (CFTBS), a Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (CCBC), a Fear Free Certified Trainer (FFCT), and the Founder of Cat Behavior Solutions. She has over ten years of experience in the cat training and behavior field. Molly specializes in the use of positive reinforcement to change and avoid undesired behaviors in cats, as well as lowering the number of cats surrendered to shelters. For the last three years, Molly has served on the Dallas Animal Advisory Committee, and she was just named one of Catpetclub.com’s Top 12 Extraordinary Cat Behaviorists of 2020. She holds certifications from the Animal Behavior Institute as well as the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants, among other organizations. She is also the host of the weekly podcast Cat Talk Radio, which she produces with her husband. Feline Training and Behavior Specialist with a certificate of completion Cat Behavior Consultant with a certificate of completion Answer from an expert A tall scratching post should be placed near your cat’s bed, as cats have a tendency to scratch shortly after they wake up from their slumber. Question: You may also place your scratching post near areas that you don’t want your cat to scratch
  • Question: What is the best way to get my cat to use a scratching post? Molly DeVoss is the Secretary of Education. Feline Training and Behavior Specialist with a certificate of completion Cat Behavior Consultant with a certificate of completion Molly DeVoss is a Certified Feline Training and Behavior Specialist (CFTBS), a Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (CCBC), a Fear Free Certified Trainer (FFCT), and the Founder of Cat Behavior Solutions. She has over ten years of experience in the cat training and behavior field. Molly specializes in the use of positive reinforcement to change and avoid undesired behaviors in cats, as well as lowering the number of cats surrendered to shelters. For the last three years, Molly has served on the Dallas Animal Advisory Committee, and she was just named one of Catpetclub.com’s Top 12 Extraordinary Cat Behaviorists of 2020. She holds certifications from the Animal Behavior Institute as well as the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants, among other organizations. She is also the host of the weekly podcast Cat Talk Radio, which she produces with her husband. Feline Training and Behavior Specialist with a certificate of completion Cat Behavior Consultant with a certificate of completion Answer from an expert In order to attract cats, spray it with a pheromone-attracting solution, such as Feliway’s Feliscratch. You may also use catnip to coat the post, or you can offer your cat a treat if you discover that they are using it. Question What characteristics distinguish an excellent cat scratching post? Molly DeVoss is the Secretary of Education. Feline Training and Behavior Specialist with a certificate of completion Cat Behavior Consultant with a certificate of completion Molly DeVoss is a Certified Feline Training and Behavior Specialist (CFTBS), a Certified Cat Behavior Consultant (CCBC), a Fear Free Certified Trainer (FFCT), and the Founder of Cat Behavior Solutions. She has over ten years of experience in the cat training and behavior field. Molly specializes in the use of positive reinforcement to change and avoid undesired behaviors in cats, as well as lowering the number of cats surrendered to shelters. For the last three years, Molly has served on the Dallas Animal Advisory Committee, and she was just named one of Catpetclub.com’s Top 12 Extraordinary Cat Behaviorists of 2020. She holds certifications from the Animal Behavior Institute as well as the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants, among other organizations. She is also the host of the weekly podcast Cat Talk Radio, which she produces with her husband. Feline Training and Behavior Specialist with a certificate of completion Cat Behavior Consultant with a certificate of completion Answer from an expert A decent scratching post should be at least three feet tall. To obtain a full-back stretch, cats scratch. As a result, your scratching post must be robust and tall enough so that the cat can stretch out while using it.

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  • Please be patient. Although it is possible that your cat will take some time to begin using the scratching posts you have given, this is not certain. Continue to encourage your cat to scratch on these poles, and scold your cat gently if he scratches somewhere else instead.

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About This Article

In order to entice your cat to use a scratching post, try rubbing some catnip on it before placing the post in the cat’s territory. Consider taking your cat’s paws and making gentle scratching motions with them on the post, which will help to add your cat’s scent to the post and increase the likelihood of it being used. Placing the scratching post near your cat’s bed, in front of a window, or next to furniture that your cat enjoys scratching will ensure that it is easily accessible. Also, make sure the post is strong, as cats are not fond of scratching anything that aren’t steady.

Continue reading to learn how to prevent your cat from scratching items it isn’t intended to be scratching. Did you find this overview to be helpful? The authors of this page have collectively authored a page that has been read 140,726 times.

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It is necessary for cats to scratch on things for two reasons: to shed their claws and to mark their territory. If you want to save your furniture from getting scratched, you should get your cat a scratching post or two and educate him or her how to use them. The following are the prerequisites for a good scratching post:

  • It is necessary for vertical poles to be robust and tall enough so that the cat may stretch out its entire body. Some cats prefer horizontal marking poles to vertical ones. Try both types to see which one your cat likes, or give your cat one of each type. Instead of being buried deep within your home, the posts should be placed in conspicuous locations. As scratching posts are frequently used by cats to wake up from naps, it is a good idea to place one near the cat’s sleeping location. You may purchase ready-made scratching posts from a pet store or create your own. Some cats prefer a basic log over a more complex log. Others find that a piece of corrugated cardboard put on a piece of wood will suffice in their situation. Despite the fact that most pre-made posts are covered with carpet, this may not be the most appropriate material for the job. Cats can get their claws caught in the cloth loops and become unable to use the post as a result of the injury. Make an attempt to install the carpet upside down or to use other materials such as upholstery fabric that are more “shreddable.” Catnip can be used to attract your cat to the post. Catnip can be sprinkled on the base and woven into the cloth, or packages of catnip can be hung from the top. Spend some time around the post, enticing your cat to engage with it and play with it. Create a play environment for your cat that includes the post and incorporates it into your game
  • The most crucial step is to reward the cat each time he or she utilizes the post. Make sure you have tasty food treats around and offer one to the cat everytime you notice him/her scratching the post.

Once your cat has become accustomed to utilizing the scratching post you have supplied, you may begin to educate him/her that other items are off limits to him/her. If you discover your cat clawing the couch or chair, make a loud noise to surprise him/her, or splash him/her with a plant sprayer or squirt gun to get his/her attention. It is critical that the cat believes the noise or the water came out of nowhere to be effective. In this way, he or she will identify the negative event with the action of scratching on the chair, rather than with you or the situation.

Scratching on furniture and carpets

In order to scratch with their front claws, cats pull them downward, either on a horizontal or vertical surface – this movement, known as stropping, loosens and removes the outer husk of the claw, revealing a sharp new surface underneath the husk. It also helps to keep the cat’s forelimbs and spine in peak hunting condition by strengthening the muscles in those areas. Some cats scratch by laying down on the floor and dragging their bodyweight across the surface of the floor. The surfaces that are used are typically rigid and non-yielding in order to withstand the force applied by the cat.

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It is the combination of scent and sweat glands in between the pads of the feet that gives the feet their distinct fragrance.

The combination of the mark on the surface, the claw husks that are abandoned, and the scent sends a powerful visual and olfactory communication to other cats.

Claw maintenance will also take place on similar surfaces outside the building.

Why does my cat scratch indoors?

Increasing numbers of cats nowadays have little or no access to the outdoors. There are also others who want to spend more time in the comfort and safety of their own homes, and who just feel better at ease when their claws are kept in a safe setting. It is also possible for children to use scratching as a prelude to play, or even as an attention-seeking tactic, provided they have learned that this behavior is favorably reinforced. Softwoods (for example, pine), textiles, textured wallpaper, and carpet are all popular substrates for use inside.

Door frames, furniture, and stairwells are among the most often used sites. Cats will frequently scratch furiously while they are in the company of their owners or other cats as a statement of territorial assurance in their territory.

How do I know if the amount of scratching my cat does is normal?

If your cat’s scratched sites are widespread around the house, particularly near entrances and windows, it is probable that your cat is expressing a general sense of uneasiness through his behavior. The dynamics of your cat home, the pattern of scratching sites, and a variety of other factors determine whether the scratching is for claw care, marking, or a combination of the two. Even if your cat’s scratching is within typical limits, if enticing scratching posts or places are not given indoors, it is possible that damage to furniture, wallpaper, or carpet may occur.

What can I do to stop my cat scratching my furniture and carpets?

In the event that you have had your cat since it was a kitten, it is critical that it becomes acclimated to handling and constraint from a young age. If a cat develops accustomed to claw trimming as a kitten, it will be well tolerated as an adult and will help to prevent damage to household furniture and belongings. This, however, should only be done if your cat is kept solely inside, as it may use those sharp claws to defend itself against assault or to get out of danger if it gets into trouble.

  1. In the case of textured wallpaper, it is recommended that the alternate scratching area be vertical with comparable texture and striations to allow the cat to extend to the same level as the original scratching area.
  2. Providing one scratching post per cat (as well as an additional scratching post for choice) in various locations is recommended in multi-cat households.
  3. If space is a concern, scratched panels can be attached to walls using either handmade or commercially available solutions, depending on the situation.
  4. For scratching, a loop-weave carpet with a high level of resistance should be used.
  5. Commercially available scratching panels made of sisal twine, bark, or corrugated cardboard may also be affixed to walls to create a scratching area that is similar to the one described above.

The use ofFeliway® (made by Ceva Animal Health) can also be useful since it offers a sense of comfort and confidence to the cat, which reduces the likelihood of scratching for territorial reasons occurring in the future.

Frequently asked questions

Why isn’t my cat using the scratching post that I purchased for him? Some scratching products are either too light to be effective against scratching or are unable to be glued to solid surfaces due to their design. Because of the lack of resistance they provide when employed, they are not particularly popular with cats. It is also critical that the scratching post, scratching panel, or modular ‘cat-aerobic’ center be originally placed in a location where your cat spends a significant amount of time on a regular basis.

  1. Because cats are prone to scratching after a period of sleep, it may be beneficial to position a post near a favorite sleeping spot.
  2. Some commercially available posts have been impregnated with catnip to make them more appealing to cats.
  3. Once the cat has approached the scratching post, a simple predatory-type activity (using, for example, a piece of thread linked to a feather) played around the base will encourage the claws to make contact with the surfaces of the scratching post.
  4. If the scratching post has numerous levels, placing yummy dry food on the modular surfaces of the scratching post may entice the less playful cat to study the structure.
  5. There is no evidence to suggest that a cat’s scratching habits would spread to other sections of carpet in the home if the post is used on a regular basis, despite the fact that many commercially available scratching posts are covered with carpet.
  6. If your cat’s scratching has caused damage to your furniture, it may be able to prevent your cat from returning to the same spot in the future.
  7. It is critical to ensure that the tape is not excessively sticky, since this might cause harm to the paws and cloth.

Some home cleaning providers sell double-sided sticky sheets that are particularly designed for this purpose, and these may be acquired from them.

In the event that wooden furniture, doorframes, or bannisters have been scratched, it is critical to remove all evidence of the scratch marks by wiping the area down with fine sandpaper and then applying a thick coating of furniture polish after the surface is smooth again.

Alternatively, if the location is not suitable for a free-standing scratching post on a permanent basis, it may be moved gradually (one inch at a time!) to a more convenient location once it has been established and is being used frequently.

Many cats like to scratch horizontally when lying down on the lowest step of a staircase, which is very common.

Unless the cat holds the stairwell on opposing sides of the right angle, so offering both vertical and horizontal scratching surfaces, it is critical that the alternative provides the same possibility.

What happens if the wallpaper becomes damaged?

Because it is smooth, this surface will be unpleasant to scratch, and it is also readily wiped to remove any fragrance deposits that may have formed.

Whatever type of deterrent is utilized, it is critical to have a vertical scratching panel of a comparable height nearby to serve as a backup.

It’s vital to note that your cat isn’t acting in this manner just to be mischievous.

What can I do to determine whether my cat’s scratching is caused by anxiety?

It is possible that even extensive construction activity in and around your home will result in intense scratching as your cat adjusts to its new habitat.

The remedy to territorial marking is found in determining the source of the cat’s stress in each unique case.

Making modifications to the surroundings in the house will also help to boost the cat’s sense of security and safety.

These odors are based on naturally occurring secretions produced by glands in the cheeks of all cats, and they may be used to increase security.

Cats are not known to scratch or spray urine in regions where this pheromone has been deposited, according to scientific evidence.

You should see your veterinarian for general guidance or for a referral to a behavior expert if you have any suspicions that the scratching is caused by stress or anxiety.

Choosing a scratching post for your cat

The scratching of cats helps to keep their claws sharp, to exercise and stretch their muscles, as well as to mark their territories. If you do not give a suitable scratching space, your carpets, furniture, and wallpaper may be harmed as a result. Once a cat discovers a scratching post that he or she finds appealing, he or she will constantly return to it! Scratching posts are available in a variety of forms and sizes, and they are an essential part of any house. Upright wooden poles wrapped in thick sisal twine or carpet, as well as platforms, beds, hiding boxes, and dangling toys for the more active, are common features of these structures.

Before you pick a cat carrier for your cat, you may want to consider the following factors:

  • In order to maintain their claws sharp, cats scratch to exercise and stretch their muscles as well as mark their territory. In the event that you fail to offer an appropriate scratching surface, your carpets, furniture, and wallpaper may be harmed. Cats are notorious for returning to the same scratching post over and over again. There are many different types of scratching posts, and they are a crucial part of any household. Upright wooden poles wrapped in thick sisal twine or carpet, as well as platforms, beds, hiding boxes, and dangling toys for the more active, are common components of these structures. Scratching posts are available in a variety of configurations, including free-standing and wall-mounted. You may wish to examine the following factors before selecting one for your cat:

There are a variety of approaches that may be taken to guarantee that your cat makes use of any accessible scratching post. It would be most appealing if you placed it near a window or radiator in a room that your cat enjoys spending time in, especially if it is one of the bigger types that integrate platforms and beds into the structure. Cats like stretching and scratching when they first wake up, so it’s always a good idea to provide a suitable scratching space near your cat’s bed when you first wake up.

In the event that your cat is not interested in the post, try sprinkling a little dried catnip plant around the base of the post or panel, or play a game with your cat using a fishing rod toy around the post or panel to encourage a connection between claws and the scratching surface; this frequently results in more scratching being done.

When it comes to scratching posts, you don’t have to spend a fortune; some of the most popular models are innovative designs made entirely of corrugated cardboard.

If you want to be more daring, you can always create one on your own.

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10 Ways to Get Your Cat to Use a Scratching Post – Train Your Cat Today!

You may find it depressing to see your cat walk right past your new newscratching post and sink their claws into the arm of your sofa instead, especially if you’ve just invested in a nice – one. Fortunately, there are a variety of tactics and methods that you can employ to persuade your cat to begin loving that scratching post rather than avoiding it.

The 10 Ways to Get Your Cat to Use a Scratching Post are:

Catnip is a favorite of most cats, so starting with it is a good idea. Sprinkle powdered catnip on and around the scratchingpost, or sprinkle it with a thin mist of catnip-infused spray to keep it fresh. Keep an eye out for your cat coming over to explore and take in the tempting aroma.

2.Encourage your cat to play near it

When your cat encounters a new scratching post for the first time, he or she may give it a wide distance because of its novel form and aroma. Encourage your cat to investigate the area by luring them in with their favorite toys. A dangly toy on a wand suspended over the top of the scratching post might encourage your cat to spend more time near the scratching post, and before you know it, they’ll be gnawing on the scratching post with their claws as well!

3.Place a pheromone product near the scratching post

When your cat encounters a new scratching post for the first time, the strange form and aroma may cause him to avoid it. Enticing your cat over with their favorite toys can encourage them to investigate. A dangly toy on a wand suspended over the top of the scratching post might encourage your cat to spend more time near the scratching post, and before you know it, they’ll be gnawing on the scratching post with their claws, as well.

4.Choose your cat’s preferred post material

It is possible to purchase scratching posts in a variety of various materials, with the most common being:

  • Sisal rope, sisal cloth, corrugated cardboard, carpet, and wood are all examples of natural fibers.

The correct material for your cat is essential, since some cats have unique preferences for the kind of materials they will and will not tolerate. Most cats prefer scratching posts made of sisal rope or cloth, so if you’re only going to have one scratching post, that’s the ideal material to choose. Cats enjoy horizontal scratching pads, which are frequently constructed of cardboard. Although the shredded cardboard might produce a mess, most cats enjoy this type of scratching surface. Some cats can get their claws caught in the fabric loops of carpet scratching posts, causing them to become immobile.

The usage of carpet scratching posts may inspire your cat to scratch other carpeted parts of your home, defeating the purpose of the scratching posts altogether.

A homemade wooden scratching post for your cat is simple to construct and is often well-liked by cats.

See also:  How To Calm A Cat

5.Place the scratching post in the right spot

Image courtesy of Yimmyphotography and Shutterstock. If you place your cat’s scratching post in an out-of-the-way part of the house, don’t be shocked if the scratching post goes undisturbed for an extended period of time. A common reason cats scratch is to mark their territory with their smell, which they do in order to distinguish themselves from other cats. Placing the scratching post next to the doors or windows that your cat frequents is a terrific method to encourage them to scratch as they pass by it as they walk by.

In this case, if your cat enjoys scratching the arm of your sofa, consider purchasing a scratching post that is made to be placed against this surface.

Having a nice scratch to stretch their muscles after waking up is something that cats like doing. Making a scratching post accessible to them next to their bed is a terrific method of encouraging them to utilize it.

6.Offer multiple scratching posts

Photograph courtesy of Africa Studio and Shutterstock If you have more than one cat, make sure you have enough scratching posts to accommodate all of your feline companions. Some cats will “claim” a scratching post as their territory, and the other cats may not want to share their territory with these cats. It’s important to make sure there’s enough of any item available for your cats to share, including food, water, and litter trays, so that they don’t feel compelled to fight over it. You might also be interested in the following: Reviews of the Top 10 Best Scratching Posts for Kittens in 2021 Favorite Selections

7.Make sure the scratching post is sturdy enough

For large breed cats, such as a Maine Coon or a Norwegian Forest Cat, a standard-sized scratching post may not be large enough for them to utilize without tipping it over. Cats like leaning their full body weight against their scratching post, and if the post feels wobbly, they will simply not utilize it in the same way again. Leaning a post against a piece of furniture can occasionally be effective, but after a post has wobbled once, you may find that your cat no longer notices it. If your cat is particularly huge, it’s crucial to make sure the scratching post is tall enough for him to get a full-body stretch.

8.Offer the correct angle on the scratching surface

Some cats prefer vertical scratching posts, while others prefer scratching posts with a steeper slope, and yet others prefer horizontal scratching surfaces, according to the manufacturer. The ideal thing to do is to provide all three scratching surfaces at the same time, because cats will select to scratch on various scratching surfaces at different times. It’s possible that your cat like to use one for stretching and another for stress relief, as well as a third for eliminating the outer layers of their claws.

We never said that cats aren’t finicky eaters!

9.Remove the temptation to scratch other surfaces

Image courtesy of absolutimages and Shutterstock In order to redirect your cat’s attention away from utilizing a piece of furniture as a scratching post, making these surfaces unpleasant may urge your cat to utilize their scratching post rather than the item of furniture. Covering sofa arms or furniture legs with tin foil, tape, or a product such as Sticky Paws, which is particularly designed to stop cats from clawing, may be an option.

10.Reward your cat

Photograph courtesy of Andriy Blokhin/Shutterstock When you notice your cat utilizing their scratching post, it is critical that you acknowledge and thank them. Ensure that you have a bag of their favorite goodies nearby, and give them to your cat whenever you notice them utilizing their new perch. As time goes by, they’ll begin to link scratching their post with receiving tasty treats. Once their new habit has been established, you may progressively reduce the amount of treats you give them, delivering them one every few times they utilize the post rather than every time they do so.

You may still express your appreciation to them verbally, though. Despite the fact that our cats appear to be distant, we all know that they adore it when we tell them what wonderful cats they are! Credit for the featured image goes to EbneRol of Shutterstock.

Cat Won’t Use the Scratching Post? Try These Tricks

@jasonfitzpatric| 3 minutes of reading time Photograph by Borka Kiss/Shutterstock If there is one thing that all cat owners want, it is for their cats to utilize the scratching post instead of clawing up their furniture. If your cat is reluctant to use the scratching post, we’re here to offer assistance. Despite the fact that there will always be cats who will stubbornly refuse to use the scratching devices you provide for them, the vast majority of cats simply want a scratching surface that corresponds to their preferences—and their preferences are a place where they can sharpen their claws and get a good stretch.

Look for “Tree-Like” Scratching Posts

Comparing your cat’s scratching post to a tree will help you understand why they aren’t using the scratching post you purchased for them. The great majority of low-cost scratching posts do not resemble trees in any way. They’re short, they’re shaky, and they’re frequently coated in carpet crumbs, which your cat is likely to reject or tolerate only to a limited extent. The cat, on the other hand, want the polar opposite of this. They desire a scratching post that is really solid, into which they can bury their claws and scratch deeply, allowing them to extend their bodies out like they would with the trunk of a tree or a fence post.

  • If the low-cost postage you provide them does not match their requirements, guess what generally does?
  • Jason Fitzpatrick is a professional basketball player.
  • We have never had any problems with it because it is stable and robust, and even our largest tom cats have always been content with it.
  • If your cat prefers to scratch horizontally rather than vertically, we also propose the horizontal version of the Ultimate Scratching Post, which is similarly beautifully constructed.
  • Cats despise wobbly posts and horizontal pads that move around on the floor.

Position It Near Previous Scratching Sites

Don’t just buy a new scratching post and put it in the corner of the room. Place it directly close to the area where the cat has been scratching. Put the post where they’re digging into the frame of your living room door if they’re doing so. Put the post in the corner of a chair in your den if they’re scratching up the corner of it. Because they’ve created a habit with the piece of furniture, door trim, or whatever else they’ve come to associate with it, moving the new post will not disrupt that habit.

Furthermore, you may consider putting deterrent tape on the surface where the cat was previously scratching in addition to situating it near that area.

Deterrent tape is a double-sided tape that may be temporarily applied to a surface, such as the corner of a couch. In order to avoid the unpleasant sensation of their paws clinging to the tape when scratching, cats rapidly resort to scratching on surrounding posts.

Entice the Cat to the Post

Sure, cats have a natural desire to scratch things, and no one needs to teach a feral cat to scratch the trunk of a tree. However, this does not imply that you should simply place the sign in your living room and hope for the best. You’re not training your cat to scratch a post; rather, you’re training your cat to scratchthispost, as the name suggests. In order to achieve this, you must entice the cat to engage with the scratching post you want them to use and to form positive associations with it as quickly as possible.

  1. It would be an understatement to say that your cat will be interested after that has occurred.
  2. In addition to providing your cat with a little catnip, you can incorporate the scratching post into your cat’s playtime.
  3. Once the cat has gotten a feel for the position, he or she will almost always return to it.
  4. Take time to pet and interact with your cat if it comes over and scratches for a few moments before looking at you.
  5. After a short period of time, people will be constantly use the post.

5 Tips to Get your Cat to Use the Scratching Post

Scratching on the furniture (or in places where they shouldn’t be scratching) is a sign that your cat needs to be fixed. Alternatively, perhaps you’re considering adopting a kitten and want to ensure that it does not scratch up your expensive upholstered dining chair. And if that’s the case, these five methods for getting your cat to utilize the scratching post are exactly what you need! Although this post has been sponsored by FELIWAY®, all thoughts expressed are my own.

5 Tips to get your Cat to Use the Scratching Post

Spring has here, which means it’s time to celebrate KITTEN SEASON! Rocky and Callie, two adorable kitties who have already become members of our family, are already a part of our lives. As a result, there are currently no plans to add another kitty to the household. OK, I should probably rephrase that: We have two cats, one of whom is really nice and the other who is not so sweet, haha. Rocky has been with us for almost seven years, and he has developed a strong set of habits. He is, in general, a really decent cat; he knows how to make use of his scratching post and litter box like a pro.

  1. His most friendly and talkative behavior occurs when his food dish is completely depleted, which is hilarious!
  2. ) Pet family member Callie, on the other hand, is a more recent addition to the group.
  3. When she lived in the country, Callie was a barn cat that could be kept indoors and out.
  4. Callie has a few of challenges that we are currently working through with her.
  5. I love how Rocky is so enthusiastic about his post and uses it on a daily basis (as seen by how well “loved” it seems in the first shot).

We’ve been very persistent in our “retraining,” and I believe she is beginning to warm up to the concept of utilizing the scratching post! We tried all of the suggestions I’ve provided here, but I believe that the usage of FELISCRATCH® has been the most beneficial.

What is FELISCRATCH?

FELISCRATCH by FELIWAY® is a scratching post that prevents cats from scratching in unsuitable locations (like furniture, rugs or curtains.) This product contains a synthetic version of a natural catnip pheromone, as well as a little quantity of catnip. For this to function, the FELISCRATCH® must be placed on or near the scratching post, where it will leave a synthetic replica of the natural pheromone that cats leave on the surfaces where they scratch, so encouraging them to scratch there again and again.

Here are my top five suggestions:

5 Tips to help get your cat to use the Scratching Post.

1. Get them started when they are young (if you can.) My greatest recommendation is to begin guiding your cat to a scratching post as soon as they are a kitten. Your cat’s age will determine how easy or difficult it will be to train them to utilize the scratching post instead than your furnishings. Scratch your fingers along the post (they enjoy the sound), and encourage them to play with toys attached to the post (like a feather on a string or any other toy your kitten likes to chase.) Anything you can do to pique their interest in the scratching post would be appreciated.

  • Select the most appropriate type of post or Scratching Material.
  • You may need to experiment with a few different foods to find out which ones your cats prefer.
  • When selecting a scratching post, the height and sturdiness should also be taken into account.
  • Making sure it is stable and does not move about when the cat is using it are important factors to consider.
  • Make certain that each cat has its own post.
  • Make certain that you have at least one post for each pet.
  • 4.

Because cats scratch as a means of marking their territory, the post should be placed in a visible, high-traffic area, preferably adjacent to where they are currently scratching or near where they slumber.

5.

If your cat is older and is scratching in inconvenient places, like our Callie, you may want to consider a behavior modification program.

By applying the FELIWAY CLASSIC Spray at the same time as the FELIWAY CLASSIC Spray, you may “double up” on your chances of retraining success.

The FELIWAY®CLASSIC will convey “pleasant messages” to your cat, providing reassurance and discouraging him from clawing your furnishings.

Week 2 is skipped, and the beginnings of weeks 3 and 4 are applied.

When your cat scratches the scratching post, make careful to praise her with soothing words and ear and chin rubs, and if possible, reward her with food, so that she will continue to link the scratching post with happy memories.

Callie appears to be getting a good scratch at the moment!

(For a map of the facility, go visit feliway.com.) Alternatively, approved internet stores such as Amazon and HealthyPets.inc can be found.

It’s now your chance to speak! Does anybody else have any other suggestions for how to train your cat to use the scratching post that they would want to share? Let us know what you think in the comments section below.

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