How To Poison A Cat

Common cat poisons

There are several ways in which cats might become poisoned by consuming items that are routinely present in the house. You may also learn about toxic plants for cats and dogs, as well as human foods to avoid feeding your cat or dog.

Over the counter and prescription drugs

It is recommended that you should not provide any drugs to your cat without first visiting your veterinarian. Many drugs can be poisonous to your dogs, and some can even be fatal. The following is a list of commonly used over-the-counter medications that are poisonous to cats.

  • Aspirin: For the alleviation of pain and fever in cats, a dosage of 10mg/kg every 48 hours is indicated. The hazardous dose is 80 to 120 mg/kg for 10 to 12 days, and the duration of the toxic dose is unknown. Acute aspirin toxicity in cats manifests itself as anorexia, vomiting, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, anaemia, and heat depending on the amount administered to the animal. Paracetamol: Cats are particularly vulnerable to paracetamol poisoning, and they should not be given this medication. The hazardous dosage for cats is between 50 and 100 mg/kg. It is possible that one ordinary strength pill is harmful to a cat, and that a second tablet taken 24 hours later is deadly. Brown gums, trouble breathing, blood in the urine, jaundice, and edema are all indicators of poisoning. Ibuprofen: Cats are extremely vulnerable to the toxicity of ibuprofen. It is well known that an acute consumption of 50 mg/kg will result in a hazardous reaction in the body. The indications of ibuprofen poisoning in cats include vomiting, depression, anorexia, and diarrhoea
  • Topical pain medications for humans that include the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory substance NSAID (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicine) (for example ibuprofen, Diclofenac and flurbiprofen). People who use these drugs should use caution when administering them in a home where there are pets. Even extremely tiny doses of a substance might be hazardous. Cats might come into touch with creams by rubbing up against their owners or by licking the region where the cream has been put to the skin. When humans pet their cats after applying the cream to themselves, they may come into contact with them as well

Other drugs that should not be given to your cat because they have the potential to be fatal, even in modest dosages, include the following:

  • Antidepressants—some kinds of antidepressants can produce vomiting and lethargy, while others can trigger serotonin syndrome. ADHD medications— operate as a stimulant, raising the heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature to dangerously high levels. Anti-cancer medications
  • Disorientation, lack of coordination, and seizures are common side effects of anti-diabetics, which produce a significant reduction in blood sugar levels. A cold medicine’s stimulant effect results in higher heart rates, blood pressure and body temperature as well as seizure activity. Among the most dangerous are vitamin D derivatives, which can induce life-threatening rises in blood calcium levels in dogs, which can result in renal failure. Dietary supplements
  • Muscle relaxants have the potential to cause death by interfering with the central nervous system.

Household hazards

  • Ant baits: These baits contain boric acid, which is harmful to cats if consumed in sufficient quantities. Ant baits have a nice fragrance and flavor that entice ants to consume them. They also appear to be a magnet for cats. ethylene glycol (antifreeze): Antifreeze (ethylene glycol) is a common source of poisoning in small animals. Cats will actively seek out antifreeze because they find the scent and taste to be palatable. The fatal dosage of antifreeze is 1.5ml/kg of body weight. Drinking antifreeze can cause an intoxicated appearance within an hour of intake, which is then followed by vomiting and depression before progressing to hypothermic shock and death within 12-24 hours after consumption. N, P, and K compounds are often found in fertilizer formulations, with different concentrations of nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P), and potassium (K) compounds. They are available in a variety of forms, including liquid, granular, and solid, and may contain additives like as herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides. Due to the fact that fertilizers are often a mixture of substances, the consequences of consumption might be unpredictable. As a rule, they induce mild to severe gastrointestinal irritation, which manifests itself in the form of vomiting, diarrhea, hypersalivation, and stomach discomfort. If a bigger amount of the drug is used, the symptoms may be more severe. Lead poisoning is a less common occurrence, however it can arise as a result of consumption of lead-contaminated household objects such as paint or automobile batteries. Vomiting, stomach discomfort, reduced appetite, diarrhoea, unsteady walking, convulsions, blindness, and tremors are some of the symptoms of lead poisoning
  • Other symptoms include: Rodenticides (rat or mouse bait) are used to control rodent populations. These are a major source of cat poisoning, and many people are unaware that feeding their cat a poisoned rodent will also poison your cat’s digestive system. Because these baits are intended to attract animals, they should be used with caution, and wherever feasible, alternatives should be used in their place. Rodenticides contain a variety of active chemicals, each of which has a unique mode of action in terms of poisoning the rat. It is critical that you and your veterinarian accurately identify the active component in the items that have been swallowed in order to ensure that the right therapy is administered. It takes one to four days after consumption for signs of rodenticide ingestion to develop. These include pale gums and a depressed and weak appearance, decreased respiratory effort and coughing, and uneven walking. Poisonous insecticides, such as organophosphates and carbamates, are extremely toxic to cats, and should be avoided. Vomiting, diarrhoea, drooling, muscular spasms, and seizures are all symptoms of ingested medication. Insecticides containing Pyrethrins and pyrethyoids can be hazardous to cats as well as to other animals. Flea and lice treatments are used to cure cats, dogs, and birds, but if they are handled incorrectly, they can cause serious sickness. They are not recommended for use on humans. Depression, drooling, muscular spasms, decreased respiratory effort, and unsteady walking are all signs of poisoning. A range of molluscicides, including snail and slug bait, are available. Molluscicides may be combined with other poisons to increase their effectiveness. Ingestion can be lethal, and there is now no available treatment. Anxiety, high heart rates, uncoordination, severe muscular spasms, and death are all possible side effects of intake of the substance.

What to do if your cat is poisoned

  • Don’t get too worked up over it. While it is critical to respond quickly, panicking can make the process of assisting your pet more difficult. Take the time to securely gather and have on hand any materials that may be needed. As your veterinarian attempts to discover whether poison or poisons are involved, this information may be quite beneficial. Additionally, gather any item that your pet may have vomited or chewed and place it in a sealable plastic bag. Please call 911 if you observe your pet ingesting something that you believe is hazardous. This includes situations when you do not see or detect any signs of harm to your pet. Even if a poisoned animal appears fine for several hours or days after the occurrence, it is possible that the animal was poisoned. If your veterinarian has directed you to do so, do not attempt to make your cat vomit on your own.

The material on this website was compiled from the Cornell University Department of Animal Science and the MSD veterinary magazine.

Top 5 Cat Poisons

It has been determined by the Pet Poison Hotline that the following are the top five causes of cat poisoning:

No. 1: Medications for people

The sensitivity of pets to many popular over-the-counter and prescription pharmaceuticals that may be found in your house is far higher than that of humans. Some of the drugs that are commonly used to poison cats are as follows:

  • Naproxen and ibuprofen are examples of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs). These pain relievers, which are the most prevalent cause of pet poisoning, can cause ulcers in the stomach and intestines, as well as renal damage. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is highly poisonous to cats, causing red blood cell destruction in these creatures. It is possible for felines to die after taking just two extra-strength pills. It is possible that antidepressants can induce vomiting and, in more extreme cases, serotonin syndrome – a hazardous disease that elevates the temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure, and may result in seizures. Benzodiazepines, such as methylphenidate, which is used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), are stimulants for dogs that increase heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature.

No. 2: House plants

Cats are infamous for nibbling on houseplants, and this behavior is detrimental to more than just your prized houseplants. Cat poisons are found in many common and beautiful houseplants, and they can cause significant injury, if not death, to cats. The following are examples of plants that are harmful to cats:

  • Lilies. Ingesting even little amounts of Easter lilies and similar plants can result in serious renal failure in cats
  • Azaleas and rhododendrons are also toxic to cats when consumed in large quantities. Tulips and daffodils, two beautiful floral plants, carry toxins that can cause vomiting, diarrhea, stupor, and even death in certain cases
  • They are poisonous. The bulbs of these plants, if consumed, can result in major stomach issues, convulsions, and heart damage
  • Sago palms are one example of such a plant. A few seeds may be enough to produce vomiting, convulsions, and liver failure
  • However, many seeds may be necessary.

No. 3: Insecticides

Animals that swallow lawn and garden products, such as those who groom themselves after wandering through or resting in a newly treated area, may be poisoned as a result.

No. 4: Household cleaners

In the same way that household cleaners such as bleach may be poisonous to humans, they are also a leading source of pet poisoning, which can result in stomach and respiratory system issues. Aside from laundry detergent, other popular home items that are harmful to cats include kitchen and bath surface cleaners, carpet cleaners, and toilet bowl cleaners.

No. 5: Glow sticks and jewelry

Whether you were at a concert or a fireworks show, you most likely carried home some sort of glow stick or necklace. However, they contain a substance with a bitter taste called dibutyl phthalate, which is why cats are drawn to them. Even a single bite into a glow stick can induce your cat to drool copious, but this is quite unusual.

Other common sources of poison to cats include:

Cats and dogs are adversely affected by this sugar replacement.

Chocolate

Several plant meals have been shown to irritate the stomach and harm red blood cells.

Rat and mouse poison

These plant meals can irritate the stomach and cause red blood cells to break down and become damaged.

Pet medications

As with humans, medications designed to treat us can cause illness or death when administered incorrectly. Cases of pet poisoning caused by veterinary pharmaceuticals are relatively rare. Pain relievers and de-wormers are among the treatments that have been linked to adverse reactions in the past.

Chemical hazards

It should come as no surprise that chemicals found in antifreeze and paint thinner, as well as chemicals used in swimming pools, may be toxic to cats.

Stomach trouble, sadness, and chemical burns are just a few of the symptoms they might cause.

Heavy metals

If your cat consumes lead, which may be found in paint, linoleum, and batteries, he or she will become toxic. Lead can induce gastrointestinal and neurological disorders if it is swallowed.

What to Do for Suspected Cat Poisoning

If you suspect that your cat has been poisoned, try to maintain your composure. It is critical to act fast yet logically in these situations. First, collect any suspected poison that has remained on the premises; this will be useful to your veterinarian and any outside specialists who may be called in to aid with the investigation. If your cat has vomited, make sure to gather a sample in case your veterinarian requests to view it.

Poison Protection: Pet-Proofing Your House

The most effective strategy to lessen the likelihood that your beloved cat will become a victim of pet poisoning is to keep him or her away from potentially harmful chemicals.

  • Ensure that any medications, even those in child-proof bottles, are stored in cupboards that are out of reach of your cat. It’s important to check for any pills that you may have dropped on the floor very away. Children and older individuals who may require assistance with medication administration should be closely monitored to ensure that they do not accidently drop a tablet. Always read and follow the label instructions on flea and tick products, and never use treatments intended for dogs on cats. Some “human foods” can be given to pets as a treat without causing harm, but others are poisonous to them. If you have any doubts regarding what is safe, you should consult with your vet. Alternatively, you might err on the side of caution and provide goodies designed expressly for animals. Make certain that any rodenticides you use are stored in metal cabinets or on high shelves so that your dogs cannot get them. Keep in mind that cats can be severely poisoned if they consume a mouse that has been exposed to these chemicals, so exercise extreme caution while using these products. If you put out rat bait, tell your neighbors about it so that they can protect their pets from exposure, and ask them to do the same for you. When choosing plants for your house, look for ones that will not cause difficulties if your cat decides to nibble on them while you’re away. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) maintains an online list of poisonous and harmless plants organized by species. If you decide to keep hazardous plants in your home, make sure they are maintained in a location where your dogs will not be able to get them. All chemicals and cleansers should be kept in locations of your home where pets will not be able to reach them.
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If you fear that your pet may be in danger, please call Aspen Grove Veterinary Care at (970) 416-0232

As a result, the stories nagged at me, they plagued me, and the question followed me about. What is the reason behind this? Why? I realize that my personal collection of news articles reflects only a fragment of the overall dismal picture, but bear with me. It has taken me a long time to uncover a genuinely strong statistical analysis, but I have had mixed luck, generally coming across a patchwork of facts. The website Pet-Abuse.com maintains a “cruelty database,” which, as of today, has 351 criminal pet poisoning instances, the most recent of which were a dog poisoning case in November and a cat poisoning case in October, both of which occurred in the state of Florida.

  1. The fact that animals can come into contact with harmful chemicals on their own – and, to be honest, poisoners rely on this fact – makes it difficult to establish a criminal case in some cases.
  2. My hometown of Madison, Wisconsin, is home to a forensic detective whom I know well.
  3. She responds as follows: “Has Myrtle Maly’s case from 2005, Spaight St., come up for your consideration?
  4. There are several ways to search for it, such by user name, date, location, or case number.
  5. Maly has been found guilty of two misdemeanor counts of intentionally poisoning an animal.

To answer your question, the active component in d-Con isbrodifacoum, which is a very dangerous anticoagulant that is frequently referred to as a “superwarfarin.” Maly, who was then 76, wound up as a case study in The Smoking Gun, primarily because she was so unrepentant: *’When I see these small feathers, I’ve had enough.

  1. He drove me there,’ she said to a detective.
  2. Because the birds are pleased right now, I get a wonderful vibe.
  3. The gray catbird was the subject of a research in Washington, D.C., which discovered that domestic cats were the leading cause of bird death in the region.
  4. Granted, some of these disputes include wild cats, like in the most recent high-profile episode, which occurred once again in the Washington, D.C.
  5. A National Zoo staffer was captured on surveillance footage poisoning food placed out for cats living near a public park.
  6. In this case, the accused, Nico Dauphine, worked as a zoo researcher with a degree in bird conservation.
  7. In exchange for her cooperation, she received a one-year suspended sentence as well as 120 hours of community service and a court order to avoid cats.

“We are thrilled that justice was done today,” said the Washington Humane Society, which researched the poisonings and took the uncompromising view that even stray cats deserve a poison-free existence.

Orlando Sentinel publishes instructions on how to kill a cat

Do you want to learn how to cruelly slaughter a cat? Don’t be concerned about having to search in the strangest corner of the Internet. The wackos are now contributing to the Orlando Sentinel by submitting opinion pieces! This week, a Florida newspaper published an opinion piece written by Ted Williams, who was editor-at-large for Audubon Magazine at the time of the article’s publication but has since been downgraded to “independent journalist” according to reports (according to a newly revised byline).

  1. In his opinion, TNR is a religion, that it is terrible to cats and hazardous to the public, and that we pro-TNR zealots should simply shut up and shut up about what we believe in.
  2. There is nothing fresh, and there is nothing factual.
  3. Here’s something completely different.
  4. Williams, it appears, has the ideal solution for dealing with this blight on society, and he isn’t afraid to express his thoughts.
  5. Shouldn’t we just put them to death?
  6. “There are two practical and compassionate alternatives to the cat-killing practice of trap-neuter-return.
  7. However, the TNR lobby has successfully prevented its registration for this purpose.

In this video, Ted Williams, of the National Audubon Society, reveals a clever approach for eliminating cats.

I only hope you’re as startled and upset as we are by what’s happened.

Now, if you click on the op-ed link provided above, you’ll note that the passage we quoted has been removed.

But don’t worry, according to Peter J.

Evidently, someone at either the newspaper or the Audubon Society discovered just how radical Ted’s political beliefs are before they were published.

They could argue that he wasn’t encouraging you to murder cats in the traditional sense.

It’s what I’d term a “wink, wink” type of thing.

In order for this dialogue to be productive, there must be some common ground.

While we believe in the usefulness of TNR programs, if someone has a superior idea, we’d be interested in hearing it.

People like Ted Williams, who believe that mass killing of feral cats by a pain pill-wielding public is the best answer, should keep their manifestos to themselves; that kind of fiery raving has no place in polite conversation.

Williams, in our opinion, is also not entitled to any compensation from the National Audubon Society.

Williams be demoted even more, ideally to the position of part-time custodial arts engineer.

We’re also interested in knowing where you stand on the subject of feral cats, Audubon. The timing couldn’t be better for you to embrace the practice of TNR. By the way, we approached the Orlando Sentinel about publishing a reply opinion piece, but they turned us down.

Top 10 Cat Poisons on MedicineNet

More than 100,000 incidents of pet poisoning were reported in the United States last year. Many of these were produced by compounds that you are likely to have in your house, substances that may appear to you to be completely innocuous. However, just because something is safe for humans does not imply that it is safe for cherished pets. A number of the most lethal cat toxins are found in foods and drugs that people consume on a regular basis. Pet poisoning symptoms can range from gastrointestinal and neurological disorders to cardiac and respiratory distress, coma, and even death, depending on how a specific drug affects your cat’s body and how much was consumed or breathed.

Top 10 Cat Poisons

Cat poison No. 1: Medications intended for human consumption. The sensitivity of pets to many popular over-the-counter and prescription pharmaceuticals that may be found in your house is far higher than that of humans. Some of the drugs that are commonly used to poison cats are as follows:

  • Naproxen and ibuprofen are examples of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs). These pain relievers, which are the most prevalent cause of pet poisoning, can cause ulcers in the stomach and intestines, as well as renal damage. Acetaminophen is particularly poisonous to cats, and can induce red blood cell destruction in the process. It is possible for felines to die after taking just two extra-strength pills. Antidepressants, which can cause vomiting and, in more extreme cases, serotonin syndrome – a hazardous disease that increases the body’s temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure, and can result in seizures
  • Antipsychotic medications
  • And antidepressants. Methylphenidate. It is a stimulant for pets with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and it raises their heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature.

Flea and tick products are cat toxin number two. Ingestion of a topical substance or excessive administration of a topical product might result in poisoning. It is also important to note that many flea treatment medications designed for canines might be fatal when used on cats. Cat poison number three: human food. It is critical to ensure that your cat does not consume any foods that might result in pet poisoning or stomach distress. The following foods should be avoided by your cat:

  • Chocolate. Cats should not be given chocolate, caffeine, or coffee, according to experts
  • Onions, garlic, and chives are also not recommended. It is possible that certain plant meals will irritate the stomach and harm red blood cells.

Rat and mouse poison is the number four cat toxin. The ingestion of rodenticides can result in serious health consequences, including death. Cat poison No. 5 is pet medicines, as the name suggests. As with humans, medications designed to treat us can cause illness or death when administered incorrectly. Cases of pet poisoning caused by veterinary pharmaceuticals are relatively rare. Pain relievers and de-wormers are among the treatments that have been linked to adverse reactions in the past. Cat poison No.

Cats are infamous for nibbling on houseplants, and this behavior is detrimental to more than just your prized houseplants.

The following are examples of plants that are harmful to cats:

  • Lilies. Ingesting even little amounts of Easter lilies and similar plants can result in serious renal failure in cats
  • Azaleas and rhododendrons are also toxic to cats when consumed in large quantities. Tulips and daffodils, two beautiful floral plants, carry toxins that can cause vomiting, diarrhea, stupor, and even death in certain cases
  • They are poisonous. The bulbs of these plants, if consumed, can result in major stomach issues, convulsions, and heart damage
  • Sago palms are one example of such a plant. A few seeds may be enough to produce vomiting, convulsions, and liver failure
  • However, many seeds may be necessary.

Cat poison No. 7 contains toxic chemicals. It should come as no surprise that chemicals found in antifreeze and paint thinner, as well as chemicals used in swimming pools, may be toxic to cats. Stomach trouble, sadness, and chemical burns are just a few of the symptoms they might cause. Household cleansers are cat toxin number eight. In the same way that household cleaners such as bleach may be poisonous to humans, they are also a leading source of pet poisoning, which can result in stomach and respiratory system issues.

If your cat consumes lead, which may be found in paint, linoleum, and batteries, he or she will become toxic.

Lead can induce gastrointestinal and neurological disorders if it is swallowed. Fertilizer is cat poison number ten. Animals that swallow lawn and garden products, such as those who groom themselves after wandering through or resting in a newly treated area, may be poisoned as a result.

What to do for suspected cat poisoning

If you suspect that your cat has been poisoned, try to maintain your composure. It is critical to respond fast while being sensible. First and foremost, collect any potential poison that may have remained; this will be useful to your veterinarian and any outside specialists who may be called in to aid with the case. If your cat has vomited, make sure to gather a sample in case your veterinarian requests to view it. Try to keep your pet quiet until you can contact your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) at (888) 426-4435 for assistance.

See also:  How To Feed A Cat With A Cone

Poison Protection: Pet-Proofing Your House

The most effective strategy to lessen the likelihood that your beloved cat will become a victim of pet poisoning is to keep him or her away from potentially harmful chemicals.

  • Ensure that any medications, even those in child-proof bottles, are stored in cupboards that are out of reach of your cat. It’s important to check for any pills that you may have dropped on the floor very away. Anyone who may require assistance taking prescriptions, such as the elderly, should be closely monitored. Always read and follow the label instructions on flea and tick products, and never use treatments intended for dogs on cats. Some “human foods” can be given to pets as a treat without causing harm, but others are poisonous to them. If you have any doubts regarding what is safe, you should consult with your vet. Alternatively, you might err on the side of caution and provide goodies designed expressly for animals. Make certain that any rodenticides you use are stored in metal cabinets or on high shelves so that your dogs cannot get them. Keep in mind that cats can be severely poisoned if they consume a mouse that has been exposed to these chemicals, so exercise extreme caution while using these products. If you put out rat bait, tell your neighbors about it so that they can protect their pets from exposure, and ask them to do the same for you. When choosing plants for your house, look for ones that will not cause difficulties if your cat decides to nibble on them while you’re away. The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) maintains an online list of poisonous and harmless plants organized by species. If you decide to keep hazardous plants in your home, make sure they are maintained in a location where your dogs will not be able to get them. All chemicals and cleansers should be kept in locations of your home where pets will not be able to reach them.

SLIDESHOW

When Animal (Allergies) Attack: Symptoms and Treatment for Pet AllergySee also: Slideshow

People products that poison cats

Cats are far less likely than dogs to become ill as a result of food poisoning since they are much more selective about what they consume! The cat, on the other hand, is susceptible to the effects of curiosity, and young adventurous felines are particularly vulnerable in the human world. Here, we’ll go through the most essential poisons for cats, so you can be sure they’re kept away from curious animals. Antifreeze An ingredient in many varieties of antifreeze is a substance known as ethylene glycol.

  1. As a result, when given the opportunity, cats are more likely to consume it.
  2. This is potentially worrisome for the cat, but if left untreated, it worsens, as their kidneys abruptly shut down a day or two later – almost always with devastating effects.
  3. Chocolate We prefer to think about chocolate poisoning in terms of dogs rather than cats, although cats can also be affected by the substance.
  4. This molecule is closely linked to caffeine, which has effects that are comparable to those of this chemical.
  5. Different forms of chocolate have varying quantities of theobromine — white chocolate contains the least amount, followed by milk chocolate, dark chocolate, and cocoa powder, which contains the highest.
  6. Treatments for fleas on dogs Permethrin is a frequent component in certain (but not all) flea spot-ons for dogs and rabbits, however it is not found in all of them.
  7. It causes damage to the neurological system, resulting in hypersalivation, tremors, and high fever, followed by severe seizures, coma, and, in the worst cases, death.

If you have reason to believe your cat has been exposed to a permethrin-containing product, contact us as soon as possible.

Permethrin is not included in any of the flea treatments given by Goddard Veterinary Group.

The poison results in severe renal failure that is almost always permanent.

Cats have even been poisoned in rare circumstances after drinking water that had been contaminated with lilies, according to reports.

If you have any concerns, please contact us immediately.

), but also because cats can not break down medications as effectively as humans.

Never, ever give paracetamol pills to a cat.

A remedy is available, but it must be administered as fast as possible!

Although it’s rare, we meet cats who have been poisoned with rat or mouse poisons.

This “secondary poisoning” is most commonly associated with the use of “professional-strength” rat baits, and it frequently ends in uncontrollable bleeding in the victim.

However, really sick cats are more likely to run away and hide, so if your cat begins to exhibit early indications of poisoning and there is rat bait in the area, get them to us as soon as possible.

Liquid laundry detergents and laundry soaps Possibly the most underappreciated item on our list — yet it is every bit as lethal as the others.

However, when their claws puncture the envelope, the liquid inside causes significant burns to their flesh, making them unable to play with them.

The detergents burn the mouth, gullet, and windpipe as they reach the mouth.

If you suspect someone has been exposed, wash them as quickly as possible and call us right away.

If you suspect that your cat has been poisoned, contact us as soon as possible. We also need to know, if at all feasible, what they’ve been exposed to in the past. It is important to remember that any delay in treatment might be deadly.

Top Cat Poisons

Your cat is inquisitive, and they like to poke their nose into strange areas. While they are exploring, they may come face to face with some less-than-obvious risks in your house. It only takes a little effort and knowledge to “cat-proof” your home, ensuring that your cat is secure and healthy at all times.

Human Medicines

Some human over-the-counter and prescription medications pose major risks to cats, so keep them out of reach of your feline companions. These medications include:

  • Diet pills
  • Pain remedies (acetaminophen, aspirin, ibuprofen)
  • Vitamins and other nutritional supplements
  • Antidepressants
  • Cancer medications
  • Cold medications

You may have heard that several popular medications are effective for both humans and cats. If you don’t consult a veterinarian before administering medication to your pet, it’s simple to give them the wrong medication or too much, which might result in their death.

Human Foods

Even though your kitten may beg when you sit down to eat (or attempt to sneak a few bits while you aren’t looking), some human meals can be deadly to them, such as the following:

  • Foods that include alcohol include: coffee, soda, tea, chives, chocolate, garlic, grapes, onions, raisins, xylitol (found in sugar-free gums, candies, and toothpastes), yeast dough.

Indoor and Outdoor Plants

There are some common houseplants – along with a few others that you can bring into your home – that might be harmful to your cat’s health, including the following:

  • Aloe, Azalea, Chrysanthemum, Hyacinths, Lily, Marijuana, Mistletoe, Rhododendron, Sago Palm, Tulip, and more flowers

Insecticides and Other Chemicals

Cats enjoy the taste of some substances in particular. Keep any chemicals, especially those that are hazardous to their health, locked away.

  • Antifreeze, bleach, detergents, de-icing salts (which dogs may walk over and then lick off their pads)
  • And other chemicals. Medications for treating fleas and ticks in dogs (include tablets, collars, spoot-on flea treatments, sprays, and shampoos)
  • Fertilizers, herbicides, insect and rodent bait are all available.

More Household Hazards

Keep an eye out for common home objects that might suffocate or strangle your feline companion. If they are swallowed, they may possibly cause a blockage in their intestines.

  • Chicken bones, dental floss, twine, or thread are all good options. Decorative elements for the holidays, such as lights and tinsel toys with tiny or moveable pieces
  • Movable parts toys

If Your Cat’s Been Poisoned

If you suspect that your cat has been exposed to anything harmful, every second counts in this situation. Make an appointment with your veterinarian. The phone number for the clinic, as well as the number for the Animal Poison Control Center (888) 426-4435, should be posted in an easily visible location. They can assist you in determining what to do next. Compile a collection of examples. Bring samples of your cat’s vomit, feces, and the poison he or she ate to the veterinarian with you. Keep an eye out for signs and symptoms.

Some symptoms, on the other hand, may appear more gradually.

  • Breathing difficulties, confusion, coughing, depression, diarrhea, and dilated pupils are all possible symptoms. Increased hydration and increased urination Stomach aches and pains
  • There was a lot of saliva
  • Seizures, shivering, skin irritation, tremors, vomiting, and weakness are all possible symptoms.

Educate. After your cat has recovered, contact your local poison control center or humane society to inform them of what occurred. This will allow them to trace down the source of the poison and avoid injury to other animals.

8 Household Items That Could Kill Your Cat

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Antifreeze

Among the ingredients in antifreeze and rust removers is a chemical known as Ethylene Glycol, which has a pleasant fragrance that cats find appealing at times. Keeping these materials out of reach of your cat, as well as ensuring that your car is not leaking antifreeze that may puddle up in your driveway or garage, can help to keep them safe from poisoning.

Ribbons and Yarn

We’ve never met a cat who didn’t like pounces on ribbons and bows. If ribbon is one of your cat’s favorite toys, be sure to keep an eye on him while he’s interacting with the toy. Keep it out of reach of your cat for the remainder of the time. A ingested piece of ribbon, yarn, thread, tinsel, or even dental floss can wrap itself around your cat’s intestines, causing an obstruction or possibly severing the intestines altogether.

If you believe your cat has swallowed an object of this nature, take him to the veterinarian right away for an x-ray.

Rat Poison

if you or a neighbor are dealing with a rodent infestation and your cat comes into contact with a rat or mouse that has taken poison, your cat may become poisoned as well. Loss of appetite, paralysis, and tremors are some of the signs and symptoms of rodenticide poisoning. It is best not to use poison to get rid of rodents, and you should take your cat to the veterinarian as soon as you believe he has come into touch with poison.

House Plants

Despite the fact that we think of cats as carnivores, the majority of them like snacking on greens every now and then. Cat grass may be grown at home or purchased from a pet store, allowing your cat to enjoy his own personal salad bar in his own house. In the meanwhile, educate yourself with this thorough list of plants from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) that are hazardous and non-toxic to cats.

Flea Medication

Permethrin is a substance that is poisonous to cats that is occasionally found in flea and lice treatment solutions for dogs and people. In the event that you want to employ a flea treatment on your cat, be certain that it is labeled exclusively for cats. If you have to use a product that includes Permethrin on your dog or your child, be sure that your cat is not exposed to this substance.

Human Food

Cats are normally not as obnoxious as dogs when it comes to asking for food from humans, but they can occasionally surprise us with unexpected dietary desires. Grapes, chocolate, and onions are just a few of the foods that can be harmful or even lethal to a cat. It’s important to remember that onion powder is a component in certain snacks and infant food. Given the growing body of data indicating that cocoa mulch can be detrimental to dogs, you may want to consider using another mulch in your yard and garden.

Liquid Air Fresheners

In certain liquid potpourri, there is cationic detergent, which can cause severe burns to your cat’s mouth and digestive system if he consumes it. It may also cause irritation to his skin. Opt for an air freshener that your cat will not be tempted to ingest or one that is non-toxic to cats. Check out our fantastic assortment of homemade air fresheners that you can produce in your own house.

See also:  How To Keep Your Cat Off The Counter

Bones

While fowl and fish are delicious treats for cats, make sure they are boneless if you are allowing them to partake in these tasty morsels. Splintered bones might become lodged in your cat’s digestive track, causing it to become obstructed or punctured. When it comes to eating, canned goods are often the best option. Were any of the items on this list that you should keep away from your cat a surprise to you? Please spread the word about this post to your relatives and friends who own cats! And for for more pet advice, check out ourPet Tipsboard on Pinterest.

Please share your thoughts with us in the comments area below or on the Who Knew?

Anna Boudinot provided the image for this post.

Killing Stray Cats With Tylenol Is “Humane,” Audubon Writer Says

It seems like everyone has a neighbor (well, some of you are that neighbor) who has a heart for all of the stray animals in the neighborhood. Cat Lady or Cat Dude scatters paper bowls full of Meow Mix on the pavements, and the scraggly, fiercely independent kittens go to the streets to tomcat all over town. You could believe your neighborhood Cat Lady is quite nice, or perhaps weird, depending on your point of view. However, do you know who truly despises the Cat Lady? Bird watchers. A major battle between cat lovers and bird enthusiasts is currently raging across the country (who say wild cats are nonnatural predators threatening bird species and other critters).

  1. This month, the subject prompted controversy at two well-known newspapers after an Audubon writer published a disturbing op-ed in theOrlando Sentinel that sparked outrage.
  2. This is a challenge for local governments, who must determine how to deal with the animals.
  3. Cats should be seized, transported to a veterinarian, implanted with a microchip, neutered, and then released.
  4. However, the cat-loving community suffered a setback in January when a study based on the work of experts at the Smithsonian Institution and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service was issued.
  5. Cat lovers have criticized this research as fear-mongering and anti-cat public relations, but in Florida, the findings may have an impact on a piece of legislation now circulating in Tallahassee.
  6. It would establish that community cat programs that employ TNR are not liable for abandonment or unauthorized release of cats, as defined by the law.
  7. It was cleared by the Agriculture Committee of the House of Representatives by a vote of 14-0 last week.

Ted Williams, an Audubon writer and skilled environmental journalist, wrote a commentary for the Orlando Sentinel on March 14 in which he described TNR as a “dangerous, inhumane, and unlawful technique.” He stated that “in Florida, where rabid cats attack people,” the majority of wild cats are infected with a feline variant of AIDS, according to him.

Afterwards, he stated that there are “two viable, compassionate alternatives to the cat hell that is TNR.” One such poison is Tylenol (the human pain reliever), which is a highly selective feral cat poison.

Trap and euthanize is the alternative option.

After cat lovers, of course, called for Williams’ removal from office (and pointed out that Orlando Sentinel readers were stupid for allowing this tacit endorsement of cat murdering to stand), Audubon initially announced that it had “suspended its contract” with Williams, which was later revised to “terminated.” However, in a blog post published on Tuesday, the CEO of the National Audubon Society stated that Williams will continue to work for the publication.

  1. Despite the fact that Williams’ op-ed “raised severe problems of judgment” and that Audubon “totally rejectsthe concept of anyone poisoning cats or treating cats in any cruel manner,” David Yarnold claimed that the organization has forgiven the writer.
  2. According to the resolution, governments should manage feral cats and neuter them instead of putting them down.
  3. The online version of Williams’ piece on the Orlando Sentinelhas been toned down to remove the passage concerning Tylenol in the meanwhile.
  4. While the comment was not wrong, it was inappropriate since it may be interpreted as a recommendation to go out and start poisoning stray cats, which would be dangerous.
  5. I should have gone with a more generic, less well-known moniker.
  6. I strongly advise people against taking the law into their own hands.

Instead, they should delegate the task to specialists. In his final statement he stated that his job as “editor-at-large” of Audubon magazine, which he had described in his initial post, was “a freelance, not a paid, one.” “I am sorry for my slovenliness.” Follow us on Twitter at @NewTimesBroward.

15 Pet Poisons You May Not Know Are In Your Home

While having flowers and herbs around the house can offer a pleasant perfume and a pleasing aesthetic, there are many florals that are harmful to cats, which is unfortunate. The most effective strategy to avoid feline poisoning due to flowers is to keep any toxic plants out of your house in the first place. You may also make friends and family members aware of the dangers of these poisons so that they do not unintentionally gift you these flowers. Some of the most lethal plant-based toxins for cats are listed here.

  1. Even a few digested parts of the bloom, leaf, or pollen of a lily, or even licking the pollen, can induce acute renal failure in certain people.
  2. The lilies that are members of theLiliumandHemerocallisfamily include, but are not limited to, the following varieties: Easter, stargazer, Asiatic, wood, Japanese Show, red, tiger, rubrum, Western, and daylilies, among others.
  3. You can reach us at any time, or you can go directly to an emergency room.
  4. 2.
  5. According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the bulb of the daffodil is the most dangerous portion.
  6. If your cat has eaten a daffodil, contact your veterinarian right away.3.
  7. Any contact with the bulb may result in discomfort of the mouth and esophagus, depending on the situation.

If you feel your cat has consumed a tulip, particularly the bulb, consult with your veterinarian immediately.

When medicine falls on the floor, cats are more likely than not to consume it.

You may even store them in a medicine cabinet or on a shelf where your cat won’t be able to get to them if necessary.

Here is a list of some of the most dangerous medicine-based toxins for cats.

Any sort of antidepressant may cause mild to severe symptoms in your cat if it is ingested by the feline.

If you feel your cat has accidently taken one of your pills, get veterinarian treatment as soon as possible to avoid further complications.

It has anti-inflammatory properties.

Even a small amount of an anti-inflammatory medicine has the potential to develop stomach ulcers, which can result in vomiting, diarrhea, pale gums, weakness, lack of appetite, and other unpleasant symptoms.

If your cat ingests anti-inflammatory medicines, get medical assistance immediately to avoid further complications.

Ingesting medications that help with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHA), such as authorized versions of amphetamines, might result in a range of problems for your cat.

Aggression, elevated heart rate, vomiting, diarrhea, panting, and other symptoms, according to the Pet Poison Helpline, are just a few of the symptoms that may arise.

While cats are normally less prone than dogs to consume hazardous foods, thePet Poison Helpline revealed that items such as onions and garlic, which are particularly toxic to cats, were in the top ten most frequently called about by cats.

Another thing you can do at home is to make certain that your cat does not have access to any food items that may be lying around your house or apartment.

Onions and garlic are the first two ingredients.

Fortunately, the severity of the poisoning is usually just mild to moderate in intensity.

Cats, in general, are more sensitive to the smell and taste of garlic and onions than humans.

However, some of the more typical symptoms may include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, increased heart and respiration rates, pale gums, and other signs of illness.

It is possible that symptoms will not manifest themselves for many days following intake.

3.

The true cause for concern arises when your cat consumes unused coffee beans, coffee grounds, and tea bags.

It is also possible to experience vomiting, seizures, and other symptoms.

3.

Intake of unbaked yeast dough, alcoholic sweets, and other unexpected areas where alcohol may occur is hazardous to cats on an equivalent level as human consumption.

Aside from low blood sugar levels and low blood pressure, severe symptoms such as low body temperature and low blood pressure may be present but not immediately noticeable.

Cleaning products for the kitchen, bathroom, and laundry can be quite hazardous to your cat.

Immediately cleaning up spills is another important step in preventing any poisonings.

Here are several chemical and cleaner-based toxins that you should avoid giving your feline friend.

The majority of detergent poisonings result in corrosive injuries, which include injuries to the eyes, skin, and esophagus that might result in tissue damage as a result of contact with an acidic solution.

The most typical symptoms are drooling, pawing at the mouth, vomiting, and lethargy, amongst other things.

2.

Ispyrethrin, a chemical used in flea and tick treatments that can lead cats to become poisoned, to blame?

Pyrethrins are often found in over-the-counter medications for dogs and cats.

In light of the foregoing, it is usually best to avoid administering dog treatments to your cat, even if the weight shown on the container for dogs corresponds to the weight of your cat.

This will lessen the possibility of your cat becoming unwell as a result of your dog’s medications.

These products can be obtained through your veterinarian’s office.

If you suspect that your cat has consumed or come into contact with flea and tick treatments intended for dogs, call your veterinarian immediately to discuss your concerns.

Antifreeze (also known as antifreeze).

The truth is that even a teaspoon of antifreeze may be lethal to cats.

If your cat has been exposed to antifreeze that includes ethylene glycol, get medical assistance right once to avoid further complications.

It is possible that items that appear common sense to have about the house can actually extremely harmful to animals.

In the event that they are unavoidable, make every effort to keep toxic materials out of your cat’s reach.

1st, there are essential oils.

According to reports, the level of toxicity might vary greatly.

In addition to drooling and vomiting, symptoms of poisoning might include respiratory distress, liver failure, and other complications, depending on the type of oil used and the way it was distributed.

Consult with your veterinarian before using essential oils into your household.

If you have any concerns about poisoning, you should consult your veterinarian.

Poisonous MouseRats The fact that there are different types of mouse/rat poisons (rodenticides) is one of the more difficult aspects of the subject.

Vulnerability signs include nausea and vomiting; diarrhea and nose bleeds; weakness; altered pupil size; reduced awareness; convulsions; paralysis; shock; trouble breathing; and, in severe cases, death If you suspect that your cat has ingested rodenticides, seek medical attention from your veterinarian as soon as possible.

Mothballs are a third option.

There are two types of mothballs: naphthalene and polydiethylene terephthalate.

While the newer PDB type is less harmful than the older form, they are nonetheless dangerous to cats.

If you suspect that your cat has been exposed to mothballs, get medical assistance immediately since cats are particularly susceptible to the toxicity of mothballs and should be treated as soon as possible.

Despite the fact that the list is extensive, please do not feel compelled to discard everything in your home.

Visit the Pet Poison Helpline or the ASPCA’s Animal Poison Control for a comprehensive list of common home toxins.

If you suspect poisoning, you can also contact the poison control hotline or poison control center. If you need to contact either website concerning poisons, however, you may be charged a consultation fee by the website in question.

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